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YamYam

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  1. I rarely buy brand new clubs now. I'm too old in the tooth. I have good idea how my game is regressing over the years so I know I need lighter more flexible shafts, but I still want the heads, so It buy the clubs with the heads but get the shafts changed. Putters and wedges I can live with, so they don't need re-shafting.
  2. I just click on the X on the and select "offensive" or "inappropriate" for all of them. They really p*SS me off!
  3. If you read Tom Wishon the fittings that most amateur players receive are basic to say the least and nowhere near the detailed standard that the professional game gets. That said, you are right. If you are paying a premium for new clubs then you deserve to have an expert custom fitting tailored to your own needs. Gone are the days when you used to go buy a "set" of irons off the peg and just play with them. The whole industry has herded everyone down the customised route. You can't buy certain clubs, such as the Titleist utility irons without having them custom fit. If this is the route that we are to be led down and the cost is going to be extortionately high then the manufacturers have to commit to making sure the product is wholly suitable. When you buy a tailor made suit, you pay for the tailor to measure you and make sure the suit fits and looks good. The same should go for golf clubs.
  4. Single length club sets aren't a new idea. I remember in the early to mid 1990s Wilson marketed a a set of irons where the lengths were all basically the same and sold to the beginner end of the market.
  5. I've not long bought a 2, 3 and 4 Titleist 712U irons. I picked them up for very reasonable prices off eBay. The shafts weren't to my liking so I got them all re-shafted the same with TT Dynamic Gold SL shafts. I've tried them against my 19°, 21° and 24° Titleist 910H hybrids and hit them just as well to about the same length but lower, so better for links courses in the wind. I haven't bought a brand new club in 8 years. Don't feel as though I need to.
  6. Never really understood why anyone would want to get out of their car on the car park, put their golf bag on another car and then drive for another four or five miles, then put your clubs in your own car again and drive home. Sure I've used a buggy once or twice but only when I've had some acute wrong with me and I couldn't cancel playing for fear of letting someone else down. I much prefer to walk the course. It allows me to get a much better feel and perspective of where I'm playing.
  7. Don't you have to send samples of newly designed clubs to the USGA and R&A for approval before you can start to sell them. You don't seem to mention this.
  8. I like to play with Titleist ProV1. Unfortunately, if you want the latest version it comes at a ridiculous premium. I think the RRP in the UK is around £55 per dozen, (around $75). Having a look around I found some of last years for £35, ($48) which is little better, so I bought 4 dozen. With the stupid price of these balls you have to start looking for something else. We can't get the decent Bridgestone ball here in the UK, and the Taylormade balls are on a price par with ProV1s. I did manage to pick up some Srixon ZStars for £25/dozen ($34) from an outlet in Chester which I gather has closed its doors now as a result of bloody Covid. The thing is never to buy golf balls when you need them. Always keep your eye out and buy them when you see the deals. Also, don't get dragged into the marketing craze of buying the latest version. At our standard, even amateur scratch, it makes no difference as all. I've still got ProV1s from a few years ago and as long as you don't store them in extremes and keep them packaged they will be OK.
  9. I still play with my 910s. Nothing wrong with them giving reason to change. I bought several weight kits. They come in four different weights. Me being the suspicious type, I got them accurately measured. They were all out to what they were supposed to be. I complained to Titleist and they actually sent me another set. I weighed those and this time they were correct. So if you do manage to get hold of some, make sure they are right.
  10. I've recently been experimenting with 3 woods. To be exact the difference between Titleist 910F and Titleist 910Fd. Both are 15 degree heads but the F is weighted supposedly to get the ball flight higher quicker. The Fd has a slightly deeper face with the weight pushed forward toward the face for a lower flight. The Fd had a stock Mitsubishi Diamana Kai'li 75, the F a Diamana 'ilima 71. Just swinging them the Fd felt heavier. I put them on my swing weight scale. The Fd came in almost 1.5 swing weights heavier than the F. Both heads weighed the same and both had the same weights screwed in. The Kai'li shaft is is 4 grams heaver than the 'ilima, which sort of equates to the extra swing weight as 3 grams = 1 swing weight. I swapped the heads over on the shafts and remeasured the swing weights. This time the F with the Kai'li shaft came in 1.5 swing weights heavier. A steel shaft is almost certainly going to be heavier than a composite, so apart from producing a heavier club overall, just attaching a head to a shaft without balancing will produce discrepancies in swing weight.
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