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mynerds

 
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    mynerds reacted to ChitownM2 in Precision PRO NX10   
    Precision Pro NX10 - Official MGS Forum Review by ChitownM2
    Intro
    First off I wanted to say thank you to MGS and Precision Pro for giving me the opportunity to review the new NX10 Rangefinder.  This will be my third review for MGS as I was lucky enough to be selected to review the Hogan VKTR+ hybrid in fall of 2020 and the Maxfli Tour balls in fall of 2021.  I was excited to be chosen for this test since my rangefinder is by far the oldest thing in my bag.  
    As a 20 handicap golfer, my game is definitely a work in progress.  I’m 42 years old and have been golfing since my teens but never really took it seriously until the last couple years. I'm fortunate enough to be able to play a round most weekends and play in a 9 hole league on Monday nights which ended a couple weeks ago.   Since I have a pretty limited amount of time for golf, I end up treating my rounds as a sort of competitive practice for myself.  It’s good in that I'm getting out enough I see glimmers of my potential, but I know that without actual dedication to a routine practice schedule I'll never achieve the scores I'd like to shoot.  

    On the course I use a variety of different devices for getting my distances.  The primary one I use is my Bushnell Tour V2 which I've had since it was new back in 2008 or 2009.  It's the "standard" model with no slope capabilities.  I use it on all par 3s and every approach shot where I have an expectation of hitting to the green.  I also have a Garmin S40 watch that I use when I don't have a direct line of sight to the flag (say in the trees or the next fairway over 😉) or on par 5 holes where I'm trying to decide what club to use for my 2nd shot based on what it will leave me to the green.  Finally, I'm an Arccos user and will often use their app on my phone if I want to know what it will take to carry some water or a particular trap from wherever I may be.  
    Going into the review I was targeting two items to evaluate.  The first being how much easier/faster a 15 year newer rangefinder locks onto pins and secondly, how helpful the slope function really is. 
     
    First Impressions (5 of 5)
    I received the rangefinder and was immediately impressed.  The packaging is very solid and visually appealing.  It is exactly what you've come to expect from other high end electronic devices like cell phones.   

    Precision Pro was generous enough to offer each of the testers their choice of 2 custom skins for the rangefinder which I think is a great touch because it allows us to customize the device to our tastes.  The devices shipped to us with one of our choices pre-installed in lieu of the standard skin and the second shipped in the retail package.  In addition to the rangefinder, the NX10 comes with a handy carrying case and a paper copy of the instruction manual which is something I really appreciate in 2022 since inserting a piece of paper telling you to go download it somewhere seems to be the norm.  Also included is a 10% off coupon for a future purchase as well as some stickers and a microfiber for cleaning the lenses.  Overall, I think they've included everything you could need so you aren't stuck spending more money to buy additional accessories.  

    Right out of the box I felt like the NX10 has just the right amount of heft to make it easy to keep stable in your hand without being heavy.  It also picks up the flags extremely quickly and provides some haptic feedback to let you know you've hit the flag.  Distances to objects shot from my yard were spot on and within 1 yard of my older Bushnell.
    Aesthetics (5 of 5)
    As already mentioned, I’m a big fan of the interchangeable skins for this rangefinder.  This is probably one of the few and most fun customization options being offered by anyone in the accessory space that I’m aware of.  The side skin fits securely to the device and is held in place by magnets so it can be easily swapped,but I never had any issues with the skin inadvertently coming loose during my time using the device.  The front skin (around the lens & laser) is held in place by two hex screws and the tool to remove them is included in the package which is a nice touch.  I had no trouble swapping either of the skins; the side can be done in seconds, while the front takes less than 5 minutes from start to finish.

    As for the other attributes of the rangefinder, it’s standard in every other way and that is a good thing.  It fits comfortably in my hand and feels solid while using it.  Build quality is top notch and I’m sure that if treated properly, I’ll get a decade of use out of this just like my previous Bushnell. 

    The Numbers (5 of 5)
    I ended up playing 6 rounds with the rangefinder along with a range session and used it extensively during those times.  Not once did it ever return a number that made me second guess it.  Every distance it produced was within 1 yard of the number my old Bushnell Tour V2 gave and consistent with what my S40 watch & Arccos were telling me.  I will say my local range should pick one up and use it to update the distances they have posted in each hitting bay 🤣.  

    Living in Illinois I don’t get to play any courses with big elevation changes but for the few holes where it mattered, the slope function did prove useful.  There were a few occasions where I thought the hole was further up-hill than it really was and probably would have clubbed up unnecessarily if the slope reading hadn’t told me that it was only adding 4 or 5 yards.
    On-Course (5 of 5)
    As a player that is accustomed to using a laser rangefinder, the transition to using the NX10 was instantaneous.  My pre-shot routine was exactly the same and I was able to keep the device in the same location in my bag since the size was very similar to my old unit.
    The overall button layout is intuitive and I was able to find the “ON” button without fumbling or looking.

    The Good, the bad, the in between (3 of 5)
    There is a lot to love with this rangefinder.  It’s easy to use, feels great in your hand, provides accurate readings and is a fantastic value at $280.  With that said, it is not perfect.  The built in magnets are powerful as advertised, but perhaps not as strong as I’d like them to be.  Late last season I bought a case for my Bushnell that includes two magnets as I was envious of that feature on newer models, but after 2 rounds I found that the magnets on the strap were not powerful enough and had the rangefinder fall off the cart twice after driving over some large bumps at speed.  Those magnets are probably twice as powerful as the ones on the NX10 so I don’t have a ton of confidence that it would never fall off and get damaged.   

    I also have two other minor gripes with the NX10.  The first is the lack of indication on whether you have hit the pin.  My old bushnell used to display a ring around the pin when you had hit the flag rather than a tree or other object in the background.  
     
    The second item is the lack of a loop or other option to tether the device that my Bushnell had. It seems trivial, but I’ve had a long strap connected to it since the beginning and it makes it easier to grab out of a bag and/or catch it when it starts sliding off the passenger seat while riding in the cart.


    Finally, while it doesn’t affect me personally, if you play competitively in events where the slope function is not permitted, it can be turned off, but it is not as apparent to other players that it has been disabled as it is on devices from other manufacturers.  

    Play it or Trade it? (5 of 5)
    For me, the Precision Pro NX10 will definitely be going in my bag.  It does everything that the device it is replacing does and then some.  The few negatives I have are really just nit-picks or a non-issue for me and are far outweighed by the positives and the style it brings to my bag.
    Conclusion
    The Precision Pro NX10 is a great rangefinder for the cost and offers dozens of options for customization. It works as expected and is very accurate and although it isn’t perfect, I couldn’t imagine paying double for a bigger name brand device that does the same thing.
    Final Score (28 of 30)
     
  2. Like
    mynerds reacted to GaDawg in Precision PRO NX10   
    Initial Post
    THANKS TO PRECISION PRO AND MGS for this opportunity! Somehow my name was selected out of over 5,500 entries for this test. I am super excited to provide some excellent feedback to everyone.

    I’ve been active on MyGolfSpy since January 2020 and this forum has been a great place for me to communicate and listen to others into all aspects of golf. I am a golf ho and am always buying, selling and trying new clubs and accessories. It’s nice to be able to share my opinions and thoughts here, the communication between all members is great.
    I’m 64 and have been playing golf just over 42 years.  I played my first 9 holes at a local course that was worse than a cow pasture with some guys that I worked with using borrowed clubs. I was immediately hooked even though I think I shot in the 90's on 9 holes. Went out and purchased a set of Walter Hagen (The Haig) clubs within a couple of weeks. I began playing the same 9 hole track about once a week and loved the fact that it was me against the course. I finally saved up enough money to take a couple of lessons, which helped a lot. As my working career progressed, I was able to search out and find better quality golf courses to play. By this time we have a foursome that played almost every Friday, we were all fairly new so learned the game together.
    Currently my handicap is a 5.5 playing at 6400 yards. This is the lowest my handicap has ever been and it's mostly due to being retired and having more time available. My wife and I will be celebrating our 45th anniversary next month, we have 3 adult kids and 3 grand kids. The kids were never interested in golf, but it looks like the grand kids may be different.
    I am a member of a private club, that has held Nationwide, Korn Ferry and Ga State events. It is a Bob Cupp design courses that requires you to use every club in your bag.
    Below are the grad kids and a group of golfers.
     


    IMG_1516.MOV IMG_1616.MOV
    Final Review
    First Impressions 5/5
    I was very impressed with the packaging of the Precision Pro NX10, the instructions were very easy to follow. They provided decals and other materials in the shipping package. See photos below:






    Aesthetics 5/5
     
    ·         The Precision Pro fits in your hand excellent when holding it. It’s not oversize at all, fits right in your palm area nicely.
    ·         Precision Pro has over 50 skins available so your rangefinder can be customized. Changing these skins is a very easy and quick process.
    ·         The Precision Pro NX10 is a high quality, very durable range finder. It appears that it would hold up under any condition. The built-in magnet will hold the range finder on any metal if you decide to not keep it in the case.
    ·         The Precision Pro NX10 comes with a very nice carrying case that clips to your bag. You can use a zipper to hold it in the case or it has a band that can be pulled around the case for a quick closure.
    The Numbers 5/5
     
    ·         The Precision Pro NX10 was very accurate on yardages to the pin. I have two other Bushnell range finders and the NX10 was as accurate or better.
    ·         The Precision Pro NX10 picked up my targets quicker than the other range finders I currently have or have used in the past.
    ·         The Precision Pro NX10 slope function worked very well and was very accurate.
    ·         The Precision Pro NX10 picked up any target that I attempted to get a yardage on.
    ·         The instructions that were provided were easy to understand and follow.
    ·         All Precision Pro products come with free replacement of batteries for the lifetime.
    ON-COURSE 5/5
    ·         The Precision Pro NX10 was very easy to use, it does not have an on or off button/switch. It is very easy to operate.
    ·         The range finder made playing golf quicker and gave you more confidence knowing you had the correct yardage.
    ·         Compared to my Bushnell Tour V5 w/slope that I was using prior to this test, the Precision Pro NX10 yardages are basically the same +/- 1 yd. The thing that I like different is the NX10 from Precision Pro locks into the target easier and quicker.
    ·         Since I was already using a range finder, my scores have improved very little. I am scoring some better, but mostly because I am playing more lately.
     
    The Good, the Bad, the in between 4/5
     
    The Precision Pro NX10 is as good of a rangefinder as I have used. My comparison during this test was against the Bushnell Tour V5, but I have had two other range finders in the past. The most impressive thing about the NX10 is it picks the target up so quickly even if your hand is not completely still. I have not found anything bad to report regarding the NX10.
    One between thing is the base color is white, over time it may change and discolor after long usage.
     
    Keep it or Trade it? 5/5
    Keep It!
    Playing the Precision Pro NX10, it picks up any target quicker than any range finder that I have used in the past. I love the availability to change out the skins and modify the looks of it. 
    Conclusion
     
    If you are looking for an excellent range finder, the Precision Pro NX10 will fit the ticket. You can customize it by choosing a skin to personalize it. At this time, they have over 50 skins to choose from. Additionally, you can change out the ring around the lens for more customization. The NX10 is built with quality, it is very accurate and locks into the target very easy. It comes with a very nice carry case; the range finder also has a magnet so you can stick it to metal on the golf cart for easy accessibility.
     
    Final Score 29/30
     
     
  3. Like
    mynerds reacted to Golf2Much in Shot Scope ProLX +   
    Shot Scope Pro LX+-Official MGS Forum Review by Golf2Much
    Introduction
    As the Southernmost MyGolfSpy member, I’m honored to test and review the Shot Scope LS+ laser rangefinder with GPS distances and performance tracking.
    I started playing golf as a senior in high school to get out of classes so I could practice with my friends.  I’ve been hooked ever since.
    I was born, raised and after completed a 27-year career in Rochester, New York before moving full time to Key West, Florida.  My home course is a classic Rees Jones designed Key West Golf Club where I play three times a week.
    As a 66-year-old, I still love playing, but find myself dealing with some of the physical limitations of my age.  Over the last fifteen years I’ve recovered from a naturally fused spine, multiple surgeries, a broken neck and a new artificial left knee.  Surprisingly, during that time my annual average score has stayed roughly the same (plus/minus a shot).  My game has evolved (or regressed) to become the golfer I used to hate when I was young.  I’m short off the tee, short with a fairway wood on par fours, chip up and one putt for par.
    Even with my aliments, I’m sporting an index between 9 and 10.  I currently track my limited “statistics” with the GHIN system recording greens in regulation (GIR), fairways hit (FIR) and putts per hole.  From the recent MyGolfSpy study “How Your Handicap Affects Your Score”, my rudimentary statistics suggest my game is atypical when compared with most golfers that share my index.  I hit only 16% of the GIR but over 70% of the FIR.
    For the last two years my golf accessories include a Garmin S42 GPS watch and a Mileseey PF210 Pro laser rangefinder.  I generally use my GPS watch for distances over 110 yards.  I rely on my rangefinder within 110 yards and for accurate distances to hazards and layup areas.  The Garmin watch does offer some basic shot tracking capabilities.  However, I spend too much time and effort adding shots and correcting information at the end of the round which puts all the remaining data in question.
    Last Summer I attended a three-day golf school.  The instructor and I quickly concluded that due to my physical constraints, only incremental improvements were likely possible.  To find those areas, I felt it necessary to capture a greater insight in my game.  I looked at Arccos and other tracking competitors.  My concern was adding one more golf accessory to my already crowded arsenal.  When I read about the Shot Scope LX+ with its integrated functions, shot tracking capabilities and app with 100+ statistics, it looked like a potential winner.
    My intent is to face off the LX+ rangefinder and GPS functions against my existing pair for accuracy, speed and ease of use.  I’m also interested in seeing if the jack of all trades and master of none saying comes into play here.  Finally, I’ll assess the ease and reliability of collecting swing data and how it translates to valuable information of my (and hopefully your) game.
    On a side note, I apologize to everyone for being a little tardy with my introduction and starting my review.  I had a long-planned vacation with friends and just got back late yesterday.   Some may feel that’s no excuse.  However, most golfers would understand given the picture below.
     
    I'll do my best to catch up and provide some insight into the Shot Scope LX+.  Cheers!
    Unboxing/Set Up
    Here's the link:  Unboxing!
    Final Review (August 19, 2022)
    Thank you, MGS, for the honor and privilege to be selected to review the Shot Scope LX+.
    First Impressions (5 out of 5 Stars)

    The Shot Scope PRO LX+ is advertised as an integrated laser range finder (PRO LX), GPS (H4) and shot tracking and analysis system. 
     The PRO LX ergonomic shape fit well in my hand.  The rangefinder’s accuracy, range, adaptive slope technology, vibration lock and rapid target acquisition features were consistent with other rangefinders in its class.  The duel red and black optics for various weather conditions was a welcomed addition.  One might have expected magnetic cart mounting capability.
    The H4’s had decent sized screen.  The preloaded 36,000+ courses included my home course.  The PRO LX and belt clip magnets appeared to firmly hold the H4 in place.  The ability to place the H4 on the rangefinder, player’s belt or bag gives users flexibility to best suit their situation.

     
    Aesthetics (4 out of 5 Stars)

    The PRO LX is larger than my current rangefinder but weighs only 0.4 oz. (10 grams) more.  The H4 mounting feature created a cradle that comfortably fit between your thumb and index finger. The function buttons are well positioned and naturally align your fingers.  The LX’s midsection has ribbed elastomer to help grip the device.  I found it little slippery and not as tactile as other rangefinders.  The slope switch is easily accessed on the side and a small green area is displayed when it’s in use.
     
    The H4 GPS unit has a screen size similar to my current Garmin S40 watch.  It was easy-to read front, middle and back distances as well as layup information and weighs only 1.2 oz (33 grams).
    I liked the feel of the integrated PRO LX+ over the PRO LX alone.  The attached H4 helped improve the unit’s overall balance and seemed more stable when acquiring a target and pressing the firing button.
    The included water-resistant case is color coordinated and comfortably stored both items. 
    Overall, PRO LX+ seemed well made.  My only reservation is Shot Scope’s warranty period.  Their one-year warranty period is at shorter end of their competitors’ 1-5 years range.
     I deducted one star as the ribbed elastomer midsection is less tactile than other rangefinders and the shorter duration warranty period.
     
    The Numbers (5 out of 5 Stars)

    The hour to initially charge the H4 unit gave me time to download the Shot Scope apps, install the tags and be ready to complete the set up.  The H4 device and app set up instructions were simple and easy to follow.  
    Before hitting the course, I compared the PRO LX+ against my current trusted devices at short and longer distances. Both GPS devices and rangefinders delivered comparable distances.

    Rangefinder
    Shorter Distance (Yards)
    Longer Distance (Yards)
    Mileseey PF210 Pro
    106
    107
    244
    244
    Shot Scope PRO LX
    105
    106
    244
    244
    To evaluate battery life, I played two rounds back-to-back multiple times without recharging between rounds.  The H4’s remaining charge after the second rounds averaged 14%.  So, the stated “15+ hours, 2+ rounds” battery life was closer to “2+” rounds.  
    It’s too soon to validate the PRO LX’s stated battery life of 5800 measurements which is slightly longer than other rangefinder’s claims.
     
    On-Course (4 out of 5 Stars)

    Acquiring the satellites and loading my course with the H4 took just over a minute longer than my Garmin S40 but had no real impact being ready for the first tee.  
    My first few rounds I was overly cognizant of tagging each club which disrupted my normal pre-shot routine.  My stressing over a missed tag was relieved with the ease I could make changes in post round editing.  After a couple of rounds, tagging became a natural part of my routine.  
    Since my putter’s Super Stroke CounterCore grip doesn’t accept a tag, I must manually mark each putt and hole location.  This proved to be a little inconvenient and required a quick discussion with my playing partners before a round.
      
    I mentioned a halo affect around the PRO LX’s LCD perimeter when viewed through my prescription glasses.  It appears I live with the restricted field of vision or remove my glasses and move it closer to my eye to get a clearer view of the LCD optics.  My previous rangefinder did not exhibit this phenomenon.
    After a round the H4 straightforwardly synchs shot data to your phone via Bluetooth.  Round details will also show up on the web-based PC app which I found easier for editing shots and signing off the round.  Having shots superimposed on the aerial view of each hole helped the editing process.

    The Shot Scope 100+ performance metrics were extensive and proved enlightening.  I could drill down into each element of my game and compare strokes gained/lost relative to similar handicap golfers which exposed my unique strengths and weaknesses.  

     
     
    My initial review of the Shot Scope statistics and analysis can be found here:  Golf2Much Shot Statistics.
    I found the shot tracking and resulting analysis capability the biggest benefit of the PRO LX+ system.  With the just released shot plotting and course analysis features, Shot Scope appears committed to expanding the offered performance statistics.
    I deducted one star for my PRO LX halo optics issue.
     
    The Good, The Bad And The In Between (4 out of 5 Stars)

    The good is the H4 with its effective shot capture capability and access to Shot Scope’s game performance statistics platform with no annual fee.
    The bad is the PRO LX’s halo effect narrowing the field of vision. When coupled with the 7X magnification, it became tougher to quickly pick up the flag stick. 
    The in between mentions include having to manually input all of my putts due to the CounterCore grip and the security of the H4 in the belt clip.  In 12 rounds, I’ve inadvertently knocked the H4 unit out of the belt clip four times.
     
    Play It Or Trade It?  (4 out of 5 Stars)

    With a retail price of $349.99 and no annual fees, the Pro PRO LX+ is a bargain for those who need accurate distances and want a better understanding of their game’s characteristics. 
    The yardages on both Pro LX and H4 were consistent with my existing devices.
     The H4’s shot tracking and Shot Scope’s game analysis features have already led me to replace my Garmin watch. Adding just Garmin CT10 tags to enable my watch’s shot tracking would be twice the cost of the H4 with included tags. 
    For me, the jury is still out on the PRO LX rangefinder.  I need a few more rounds to see if removing my glasses to take readings offsets the slightly faster response times, red and black optics and other PRO LX’s benefits.
     
    Conclusions:
    The Shot Scope PRO LX+ is multifunctional product that can honestly say its overall performance is greater than the sum of its parts.  At an attractive price, golfers get a full featured laser rangefinder, a fully functional GPS unit and no annual fee shot capture and analysis capability.  I found the shot capture easy to set up` and edit while the resulting stroke analysis proved to literally be a game changer for me.  The PRO LX+ is a solid addition for anyone who regularly plays golf. 
    Final Score:  26 out of 30 Stars
  4. Like
    mynerds reacted to Rwagn4 in Shot Scope ProLX +   
    Introduction:
     
    My thanks to MGS and ShotScope for providing this testing opportunity. This is my first time testing a product for MGS and I'm excited to be included. My name is Bob and I'm from York, PA which is about 30 minutes south of Harrisburg and an hour north of Baltimore, MD. I've been golfing off and on since my early 20's (I'm 52 now) – and to show my age, my first set of clubs were Spaldings (yes, for those too young to remember they used to make more than just basketballs and volleyballs – lol). I spent most of the past 30 years as a few times a month golfer until 2019 when I joined a golf league with some friends from work and started playing weekly plus hitting the range about once a week as well.  I'm still a high handicapper but working on it - basically I'm your local golf league hacker who looks like a scratch golfer on one hole and like it's my first time picking up a club on the next one – consistency has been my biggest hang up. 
    I really wanted to test the ShotScope ProLX+ as I love using data to see where I need to improve and I believe the shot tracking capability offers this plus more. I currently do some basic tracking by hand and with the Grint app which shows my short game and driving accuracy as 2 main culprits. I'm curious to see if the H4 shot tracking offers any other insights.
     
    I really see this as 3 tests in one.
    Rangefinder: I don't currently use one as I love my GPS but I have used my friend's unit on occasion and do see some advantages especially on par 3's and for slope. Currently when I need to check layup distances I use the GolfGPS Rangefinder app but it is cumbersome to pull my phone out each time. I see the H4 has layup distance calculations so I'm very interested to see how that works.
    GPS: I've used a Bushnell Neo Ghost nearly every round since it first came out. When not using it (if I forgot to charge it), I use the iGolf app on my phone. I've always liked the simplicity of using a GPS to get front/middle/back distances but I do see the advantages of a range finder. My biggest issue with the Bushnell is the time it takes to start up, get a signal and find the course. Occasionally I have forgotten to turn it on before teeing off. When that happens it usually is not ready to use before hitting my next shot leaving me guessing on distance. I'll be putting the H4 head to head against the Bushnell for these tests. If the H4 starts up faster that will be a big selling point for me.
    Shot Tracking: I have never used Arccos but I am really interested in the stats the shot tracking capability will provide. As I mentioned, I use Grint for some general stat tracking (Putts, Fairways hit, GIR, etc) so I love having data from my rounds and this will provide much more than I can currently track by hand. With changing my swing I have also been trying to track yardages to see if there is any change in club distances – this function will help a lot with that. My only concern is if I can adjust to tagging my club before every shot. We will find out soon!
     
    That's the basics about me. My goal is to provide the MGS community with a fair and honest evaluation so those considering purchasing this item can make an educated decision.
     
    Final Review (August 22, 2022)
    First Impressions (4 out of 5 Stars)
    Looking for a new rangefinder? Compact & accurate GPS? Want shot tracking and a full suite of performance statistics without paying a subscription? Shotscope Pro LX+ does all three which is why I was excited to try it out during practice and on the course.
    First impressions the product is well packaged and comes with everything needed to get started including the battery (CR123) for the rangefinder.



     
    One hang up for me right out of the box is the proprietary charging cable for the H4 which is why I gave 4 stars.  This requires you to remember to take the cable with you if travelling or buy an extra cable from Shot Scope ($20 on their website) which I find unnecessary when most electronic devices have gone to USB type C or USB Micro for charging.  Not sure if it would have increased the size of the H4 for a different port but it would have been worth it to eliminate the special charging cable. 
     
    Aesthetics (5 out of 5 Stars)
    The Pro LX rangefinder weighs in at a little over 7 ounces so it's very lightweight, easy to carry and hold steady.  My favorite feature is the ergonomic cutout on the bottom for your thumb which allows you to comfortably grip it.  The size is ideal for the average hand size and the buttons are perfectly positioned on top to allow for easy function selection.
     

     
    It has all the key features you could want in a range finder:
    Rapid target detection Target lock vibration X7 magnification with adjustable eyepiece Adaptive slope (with ability to turn off for tournament use) Red or Black optics option Water resistant 900 yard range (with option to display meters)  
    The H4 attaches securely to the ProLX in the designated cut out giving another option for carrying it if not worn on your belt.  I didn't find this practical if using the shot tracking feature and needing to tag each club but it is a nice available option not found on other GPS devices. 

     
     
    Numbers (4 out of 5 Stars)
    Both the ProLX and the H4 really stood out for measured accuracy.  The ProLX when measured at a local driving range with known target yardages was within a yard on all measurements.  It is nearly instantaneous to acquire the target and give a yardage reading.  The H4 starts up fast (about a minute on average) and was within 2 yards on all middle of the green measurements compared to my Bushnell Neo Ghost.  I checked the few front/back discrepancies that were greater than 2 yards with the rangefinder and found the H4 was usually more accurate than the Bushnell. 
     
      

     
    My one negative here is the battery life which is much lower than the 15 hours advertised.  In actual use the battery life was closer to 10 hours which is 33% less than stated by the manufacturer.  I found you can get 2 full rounds before needing a recharge so it still performs adequately but not as advertised so hence the 4 out of 5 rating.
     
    On Course (5 out of 5 Stars)
    The ProLX and H4 both perform as expected on course.  The Shot Tracking also works great and is easy to edit shots if needed.  Although the mobile phone app works for editing shots, it is much easier to do on a tablet or PC due to the screen size. 

     
    There is a full suite of stats tracked in the app - more than most people would ever use but that is the great thing about it - whatever stats are important to you will probably be available.   The app tracks your stats for every club so you can measure your progress.   
     


     
    I did struggle with remembering to tag every shot and usually had a shot on every other hole that I needed to edit/add in particular chips/putts where it was not part of my preshot routine.  I found the shot tagging to be a distraction during league play and actually stopped tracking my shots during those rounds and just use it during casual rounds.  It's still beneficial to get my average yardages but without tracking all shots I'm not truly tracking my progress.  I'm sure if I kept working it into my preshot routine it would become easier but for now it's too much of a distraction and I actually shoot worse during league play if I have to keep reminding myself to tag the shot.  I didn't drop any stars for this issue as it's my own fault for missing shots but I mention it as I'm sure others may have the same experience.  
     
    The Good, The Bad, The In Between (3 out of 5 Stars)
    There is one "bad" for the H4 that cannot be overlooked and was experienced by several testers including me.  While the metal belt clip is strong to hold it on your belt, the magnet in the H4 is not strong enough to securely hold it in the holster clip and it will fall out if bumped during a shot or if not properly seated in the holster.  I had it happen at least 5 times during the testing period.  Twice I couldn't find it right away and had to back track to my last shot to look for it.  That's an issue for pace of play not to mention the huge risk of losing it.   I was actually lucky to find it each time as the device is very small and the black case is not easy to find in the grass.  If you lose the H4 you also can no longer track shots so 2/3 of what you paid for is gone. 
    This is a design flaw that should be easy for ShotScope to fix.  Hopefully future versions will have a redesigned clip to hold it more securely.  I would actually buy a replacement clip if they did as I no longer carry it on my belt and keep it in my pocket for fear of losing it during a round.   Since this issue is changing how I use the device and risks the H4 being lost I had to drop 2 stars. 
     
     Play It or Trade It (4 out of 5 Stars)
    The ProLX rangefinder is in my bag to stay.  I love how lightweight and easy it is to use.  In less than 10 seconds I can pull it out of my bag, acquire the target and have a distance.  I highly recommend it as a solo purchase or with the full set.  I like the H4 and will continue to use it as it starts up faster than my Bushnell Neo Ghost but the clip issue mentioned above makes me unlikely to carry it on my belt and honestly I'm sure I would lose it if I did.  Shot Tracking is a great feature but I don't use it during league rounds so I'm not getting the full functionality out of the full set that's why I could only give 4 out of 5 stars. 
       
    Final (25 out of 30 Stars)
     
     
     
     
  5. Like
    mynerds reacted to cnosil in Shot Scope ProLX +   
    Introduction:
    Wanted to say upfront thanks to the mod team for selecting me to test this product and to Shot Scope for providing the units for us to test.    I’m Chris and live in Newport News, VA; which is about 20 minutes from MGS headquarters.   I have been playing golf on and off since I was a teenager (I am now 56) and prior to actually getting out on a course I remember getting my hands on some clubs as a preteen with my neighborhood friends and hitting balls in a cemetery near the house where I grew up.  I started playing on a regular basis in about 2000 when a friend invited me to play in his weekly group.   The group has shrunk in size since then but I still play with a few from that group and play in my company’s golf league.   My game has gone up and down through the years with my handicap getting as low as a 4 and is now probably about a 9 (guesstimate).   I am generally a huge golf junkie and love learning about products and all things golf which is why I volunteered my time to be one of HQ’s most wanted testers.  Being a most wanted tester lets me hit all the various clubs on the market but also lets me get access to see and touch lots of unique products in the golf world.   
    The Shot Scope PRO LX+ is an interesting product as it is really three products that have been packaged together:
    PRO LX rangefinder - Will be comparing this to my 16-year-old Nikon Rangefinder H4 GPS – Will be comparing this to my Bushnell Neo Ghost GPS.   The Bushell is my current distance measuring device of choice and I use it 90% of the time when playing. H4 shot tracking and online dashboard – I don’t currently have a system like Arccos but have tried some of the phone/computer-based systems like myRoundPro, 18Birdies, DECADE foundations, the Grint, and some excel based trackers.   The shot tracking aspect of the package is probably what interests me most since this is will be my first experience with automated stat capture.  My prior experiences have been cumbersome paper based or requiring me to pull my phone out of my pocket for every show so I am very excited to see how easily the tagging feature is and how it does at capturing all my shots and see if my personal assessment of my game lines up with what Shot Scope indicates.  This feature alone will probably be the key contributor in whether the product stays in the bag.
     Some of the things I will work through are the various claims that Shot Scope makes like startup/course identification time, does slope calculation really provide meaningful information, rangefinder optics and accuracy, the various stats that it captures, and most importantly the battery life of the H4 unit since it becomes more difficult to track stats if the device can’t power on.  
    That’s a quick intro about me and what I am hoping to learn, but these reviews are done for you the MGS readers.   Leave comments about what interests you with this product and if possible, I’ll give it a try and get you the information you need to make your purchase decision.  
     
     Unboxing/Setup:
     https://forum.mygolfspy.com/tests/43-shot-scope-prolx/?do=findComment&comment=9591
     
    Final Review:
    First Impressions (5 out of 5 Stars)
    As I unboxed the various components, I was impressed with how it was organized and put together.  The product appeared to be of high quality, has multiple color options, and based on claims attempts to provide data that should help a golfer improve.   Reading through the website features like target lock vibrations, no phone required on the course, 15-hour battery life, strokes gained metrics, slope calculation, and no subscription fees made it seem like the perfect product. 
     There was some initial setup required like charging the battery on the H4 (GPS), installing the battery in the rangefinder, installing the tracking tags, creating shot scope accounts, and linking your phone to the H4.  It took a couple of tries to get the device to connect to my phone but this seems to be a common problem based on other reviews I have read about the product. 
     On course impressions were generally favorable. Turing on, finding the course (when it worked), and club tagging were all straightforward processes.   Remembering to tag the clubs was a personal issue and not related to the product capabilities in any way. 
     
     
    Aesthetics (4.5 out of 5 Stars)
    H4 – The size of the GPS and tracking unit was compact and easily fit in your pocket or on your belt Rangefinder – a little bigger that most current models but shaped in a way that made it easy to hold. Both products appear to be durable to bumps and drops but because they are electronic devices, I do treat them carefully and try to avoid dropping them.  The only durability issue I have seen reported is potential scratching of the H4 screen when tagging clubs. I am going to deduct 0.5 starts for the storage case.  While the case is of good quality, it is a little tight to fit the rangefinder, the H4 unit, and the belt clip.   If you didn’t use the belt clip it fits perfectly.   
     
     
     
    The Numbers (5 out of 5 stars) 
    Both the products (H4 and Rangefinder) provide accurate yardages and are consistent with my other distance measuring devices.   The slope feature isn’t as awe inspiring as I had hoped but the calculation seems in line with how far I hit my club.  The tagged data is fairly accurate but does requires some post round editing to get accurate shot locations.  Putting and pin capture needs adjustment on most holes.  The instructions for using the device can be a bit difficult. To get the best results I strongly recommend reading the user guide and the FAQ on the site as there are subtle things that you should do to get accurate data.   For example, if you don’t reach the green on a par 5 in two shots it should be marked as a positional shot.  If you don’t, the proximity to the hole numbers for approach shots will be inflated.  Charging is quick, but battery life for the H4 is significantly less that 15 hours in Track+GPS mode.   If you were playing back-to-back rounds, you would probably get both rounds in, but if they were a day apart.  It would be a push to get both rounds on a single charge.  Customer support appears to be top notch. I leveraged them for my first round to get a course mapped that wasn’t included in their course database.    I also leveraged their online support group on Facebook to troubleshoot issues and lean more about the product.   
    On-Course (1 out of 5 stars)
    I’ll cover the "on course" views in 3 sections (H4, Rangefinder, Apps/dashboard)
    Rangefinder (3 out of 5):
    The rangefinder is very easy to use, buttons are well placed and the unit doesn’t require you to navigate lots of menus to change functionality.   I confused target-lock with pin-lock.  The unit vibrates when you shoot anything not just the flag.  When shooting distances, I typically looked at the back distance on the H4 and made sure the rangefinder distance was less than that number.  When using the rangefinder unless you pushed our eye against the viewfinder a white halo effect occurred that obscured the view of the displayed information.  The unit was basically unusable with sunglasses on and the focus ring was easily turned causing the image frequent adjustment to get a focused display.   H4 (1 out of 5)
    This is the most desired component of the product; especially the shot tracking. Provides GPS distances to the green and various hazards on the hole Easy to read and accurate. Biggest issue is that while the magnet is strong, it can be dislodged from the belt clip. Biggest adjustment is remembering to tag the club.   This is the biggest different from their watch product The watch is designed to automatically capture the club based on proximity when making a swing The H4 is designed to manually tag which is more reliable assuming you can remember to tag the club. While I loved the device, I had to significantly mark it down due to the device not being able to find a course that was supposed to be on the device. Based on the support site this is a common problem and often results in device replacement.   I don’t expect to get to a course and have the GPS say no course found when the app indicates that the course is loaded on the device.  This issue was documented several times in the Shot Scope facebook group with no real solution; often devices were replaced.  In some cases it fixed the issues and in others it didn’t.
    Apps/Dashboard (3 out of 5)
    This is where you can do shot analysis and evaluate your performance.  App and Dashboard provide basically the same information, but navigation or functionality may be better in one over the other. There is lots of information and you need to read the documentation to understand the right way to tag and identify shots and be able to understand what the information is telling you.  It is not a simple log in and the software tells you what you need to improve. Tagging locations aren’t 100% reliable and you need to remember your shots to when you review and sign off on your rounds.  Round editing should ideally be done on a laptop/desktop computer and not a phone or tablet. Occasional connection issues between the phone and app.   Shot Scope is continually adding new functionality! Provides data in a "raw" data format as well as via strokes gained for tee shots, approaches, short game, putting, and overall; both against adjustable handicap benchmarks.
     
    The Good, the bad, the in-between (2 out of 5 stars)
    The product does what it advertises and someone willing to dig in and crunch some numbers can find out details on where they need to improve.   Overall, the product is good, customer support is great, but there are a few things that can really frustrate the user which the biggest being phone/H4 connectivity when trying to sync information and the inability to find the course.   The later is the most frustrating because you don’t find out until you are at the course and ready to play.    If you want to track shots, attaching the H4 to the rangefinder makes it cumbersome to tag your clubs; attaching the H4 to your belt or putting it in your pocket are better options.   
    One of my favorite capabilities is the ability to capture each shot on the hole.  I enjoy seeing people post these on the forum and am glad I can now do the same.

    Play it or Trade it? (3 out of 5 stars)
     I am going to continue to use the product despite its issues based on my desire to dig into my performance numbers.  The big question will be how long to I want to track these numbers and will I get tired of the shot tracking aspect.  Even though there are courses that aren't found; which is a huge reliability issue, I am going to persevere and see if I can work around or solve the problem.  Keep an eye on the review comments and the ShotScope user community on the forum.  
     Conclusion
    Depending on what capabilities the golfer is looking will depend on whether I would recommend this product.  The LX+ is a packaged product that contains a rangefinder, GPS unit, and shot tracking capability.
    If you are simply looking for a rangefinder, I would consider this an average product in the market place and would look elsewhere.  
    If you are looking for a device that provides front, middle, and back green distance, hazard distances, and layup distances the H4 could be a solid product since the information is accurate and it responds quickly.   The hesitation to recommend even for only GPS capability is that the device  occasionally cannot locate the course making it unusable for the round.  While trying to collect some data for my review I had to go to three different courses to get a course that the unit could identify.
    If you are interested in shot tracking; the captured data, analytics, and lack of subscription cost make this the perfect product.  While you have to manually tag the clubs with each shot, you won’t miss shots unless you forget to tag them.  It is also important to note that GPS locations aren’t perfect and you will need to edit your shots post round.    Make sure you read the instructions, read the website, and are prepared to have to dig into data if you want to make full use of the shot tracking feature.   Again, the big problem is that if you can’t locate the course, you can’t tag the shots. 
    This screen below is why I am hesitant to recommend this product:

    Final Score (20.5 out of 30 stars)

     
    One Year Update
    It has been about a year since I started testing the Shotscope ProLX+ devices.     I have continued to use the devices but I would say that my quest to dive into the data has waned.   
    RangeFinder:  Still considered it an average to slight above average rangefinder.  Use of a GPS device to get F/M/B distances is beneficial to help validate that flag readings are really the flag and not something in the background.  Favorite aspect is the slope feature.   
    H4:  I still consider it pretty reliable for capturing shots; most "problems" center around the putting green such as  capturing the flag or putt locations.   Occasionally, courses aren't picked up even though the device shows that the course is loaded and doesn't need an update.  This happened during the MGS Pinehurst trip;  Pine Needles wasn't recognized.   I have also stopped using the H4 for anything other than GPS during my competitive league matches;  not that it is difficult but I find it distracting to use around the green to capture the pin location.    The main intent of the H4 is to capture data about your game to identify areas to work on to improve.  While it does show how I compare against various handicap levels to help manage expectations  at my level of play I find that the data doesn't reveal anything that I can't identify through normal game evaluation.   
    Summary:  I think the product is good for the right person and would still rate it highly.   I thought I was a data geek and wanted to know more detailed stats but after using the device I can only say the data is interesting but not game changing for me.  Going forward I will still use the rangefinder and h4 unit for distances but probably won't do stat tracking anymore.  
  6. Like
    mynerds reacted to MattWillGolf in Shot Scope ProLX +   
    I would like to thank My Golf Spy and Shot Scope for the opportunity to be a tester for the Shot Scope Pro LX+. THis is my second testing opportunity for the Forum. Last year I tested the Evnroll ER11v putter.  I was interested in this test as I had a free trial of the Arccos Caddie last year for being a Ping club owner. I also have a Mileseey range finder. I am really hoping to find something that just works and offers good value for money. I have been an off and on golfer since my mid-20s, after getting out of the Army in the late 80s. I was born and raised in the San Francisco Bay Area and grew up across the street from a golf course, but I never played the game as a kid. I once came home from school to find a broken bedroom window and a golf ball on my bed. That golf course was Sharp Park Golf Course in Pacifica, CA. It was designed by Alister MacKenzie. The first course I ever played a full 18 holes on though was Harding Park. That was well before it was managed by the Arnold Palmer Company and before it became a TPC site and host to the PGA Championship.
    My professional life started in the US Army where I was trained to maintain and repair medical equipment. I got out of the army and joined a medical imaging equipment manufacturer where I worked for 31 years. That company had moved me all over the U.S. My first move took me from California to Connecticut for several years. It was in CT that I recorded my one and only eagle. It was in league play, and it was a pitch in on a par 5 on the 9th hole at Grassy Hills Country Club in Orange, CT. Work then moved back across country to the Seattle area. There were several courses I enjoyed playing in Washington. Walter Hall in Everett, WA was my home course. In 2018, my wife and I moved cross country again to be closer to family. This time to Central New York, just outside of Syracuse. In 2019 my job changed and joined the ranks of semi-retirement which now allows me more regular golf, weather permitting as I am fair weather golfer.
    My current home course is Radisson Greens in Baldwinsville, NY. It is an 18-hole par 72 course at 6360 yards from the white tees. The course was designed by Robert Trent Jones, Sr. I have a Monday through Thursday membership there and I get out a couple of times a week. The course is very challenging, but I love the layout. It is tree lined and tight in spots.
    I play golf because I enjoy being out walking the course and if good scores come then it is a bonus. I also am an equipment junkie. I remember reading Golf Equipment Magazine (one of those paper things that was out before the internet). If I had the means, I would probably be a putter collector. I just love the aesthetics of good golf equipment I am a fan of BB and F Co. ferrules and installed some on my wedges. I also have a small collection of third party designed headcovers, mostly Rose & Fire with a couple of Scotty Cameron’s thrown in for good measure.
    On the equipment front, my first set of clubs was a Wilson box set with wooden woods. From there my bag make up has changed but my woods have seen the most changes. I have rotated through a lot of TaylorMade Divers and fairway woods, but I eventually switched to Ping. My Ping G400 Max was the first time I was fitted for a club, and I have yet to find a reason to change it. My iron history is small starting with Dunlop DDH II, TaylorMade Super Steel. My irons are Ping G25 4- UW (I won these through work). I did have some PXG 0211 irons but found that the Ping G25s were better in the wet conditions of the start of the season and have not switched back. Earlier this year I had a Ping G410 Crossover 4 in my bag and during a round I noticed the head was twisting on the shaft so off it went to Ping for repair. It has since been returned but I am hitting the G25 4 iron much too well to remove it from my bag.  The PXG clubs entered my bag mostly because of price. The For Heroes Program PXG offers was just too good of a deal to pass up. The PXG 0341 3 wood is the best performing 3 wood I have ever had in the bag. My wedges have either been Cleveland or Callaway. Now I have two Callaway wedges in there. A Mack Daddy CB 54° and a Callaway MD3 58°. My putter history was primarily Anser style putters. They include two TaylorMade putters the last being the Rossa Daytona 1. I gamed Odyssey Metal X Milled #2 but I did not like the feel of it. It was a My Golf Spy review and Most Wanted win that led me to trying Evnroll putters for the first time. I ended up with a mallet putter for the first time when I purchased the ER7. I was initial attract to the idea of a higher MOI putter but really like the feel and consistency of the roll the ER7 gave me. I tested the Evnroll ER11v putter last year for the forum and that putter has found permanent hope in my bag. Evnroll ER11v Official Review
    I am also a member of the “Pushcart Mafia” with a Clicgear 3.5+ pushcart. This probably the single best golf accessory item I have ever owned.
     

     
    What’s in my bag? 
    Bag: TaylorMade Supreme Hybrid Stand Bag
    Driver: Ping G400 Max 10.5° set to 9.9°
    Shaft: Ping Alta CB Regular Flex
    Grip: Golf Pride CPX
    3 Wood: PXG Gen 1 0341 15° set to 16°
    Shaft: Project X Even Flow Blue 5.5
    Grip: Golf Pride MCC Plus 4 Teams
    Hybrid: Ping G30 19°
    Shaft: Ping TFC 419H Regular Flex
    Grip: Golf Pride MCC Plus 4 Teams
    Irons: Ping G25 4- UW
    Shafts: Ping CFS Regular Flex
    Grip: Ping 5L
    Wedges: Callaway Mack Daddy CB 54°/14°
    Shaft: KBS 105 Hi Rev 2.0 Wedge Flex
    Grip: Callaway Golf Pride SG-1
    Callaway MD3 58°/9° W Grind 
    Shaft: w/True Temper Dynamic Gold
    Grip: Golf Pride Tour Velvet 360
    Putter:  Evnroll ER11v 34”
    Grip: Evnroll non-taper 1.2
    Pushcart:
    Clicgear 3.5+
    Rangefinder:
    Mileseey PF210
    Bushnell NEO Ion GPS watch
    Ball:
    Snell MTB or Maxfli Tour
     
    Final Review August 22, 2022
    First Impressions (5 out of 5 Stars)
    Firstly, thanks to My Golf Spy for this opportunity to test the Shot Scope Pro LX+. This product caught my attention because of functionality and the price. I was very interested in the value for money offered by this product. My points of reference for what the Pro LX+ have to offer are my Mileseey PF210 laser rangefinder, my Bushnell Neo iON GPS watch and a 45-day free trial of the Arccos Caddie that I had last year. These items in a nutshell cover the range of what the Pro LX+ brings to the course.
    The Pro LX+ (for $349.99) is made up from 2 products offered by Shot Scope. The Shot Scope Pro LX Rangefinder (for $249.99) and the H4 Handheld GPS with shot tracking (for 149.99). You get a $50 savings purchasing the Pro LX+. For me though the most compelling part of this package was the shot tracking that can be achieved without an annual subscription. The current Arccos subscription price is $155.88. Arccos breaks it down as $12.99 a month billed annually.

    The Pro LX+ can be part of a round of golf in several configurations. You can combine the Pro LX rangefinder and the H4 GPS. They can function separately of course. The Pro LX rangefinder has slope and non-slope measurements, two readout colors, red or black, can display yards or meters and two modes, golf mode and continuous scan mode. It vibrates when the target is locked on. The GPS offers 3 modes, GPS, GPS + Track and Track. The magnet on the device allows it to be mounted in the holder or on any ferrous metal piece such as cart. I didn’t find it practical to use it other than on in the holder on my belt for shot tracking. I only used the H4 once without shot tracking.

    To start you charge the H4 with the included proprietary cable, connect it to the phone app, perform a firmware update, install the tags on your clubs, (they just simply screw into the grip) and build you bag to identify each club by brand and model. Each tag is marked for each club with two additional tags, X1 and X2.
     
     
    Then to use just hit the power on button and then press it again to acquire the measurement. The H4 comes to life when you press the upper left button once powered up select the mode you want. For me it was usually GPS + Tracking. Then the device hunts for the GPS and the courses nearby. Simply select the course and you are ready to go. When I the tee box tag your club and enjoy your round. When the round is finished you simply exit your round. In order get your shot metrics just turn on the device and connect the device to your smartphone app. Select sync and the H4 will upload the round for you. Once uploaded to the app you can then edit and sign your round, Editing is straight forward. Select the hole and review your shots. You do this for each hole. You can also insert changes such as penalty strokes. For me, this is usually the 3rd hole of my home course. It’s a long narrow par 5 with thick trees down the left and water all along the right. The water fronts the green as well. Once you complete editing you “sign” your round. The metrics then get uploaded to your Shot Scope account where you can then view them either on the smartphone app or online.

    Aesthetics (5 out of 5 Stars)  
    The overall design of the product is nice. The laser rangefinder looks nice and fits very comfortably in my hand. The color screen of the H4 is easy to read and navigate through. I do like it much better than my Neo iON GPS golf watch. The belt clip for the H4 works better than expected. I was concerned that the device would fall out of the holder. This happened to me twice. Once on a green when bending down to pick up my ball and once when riding. I did become extra cautious though when riding and kept it in my pocket for the remainder of the round. I did feel it would be bad form to lose it during the review process. The case for the rangefinder has a nice look to it as well. Not like the Mileseey which reminds me of a Bushnell knock off. The smartphone app works well.

    The Numbers 5 out of 5 stars)
    The numbers were very consistent when compared to my current devices. The H4 for was seemed to always be within 3 yards of my Bushnell GPS watch. And there was some discrepancy between the Pro LX rangefinder and Mileseey PF210 usually within 3 yards. But the Shot Scope consistently found the target more quickly. To be fair though the Mileseey PF210 was only $81 on an Amazon “Black Friday” purchase.

     The setup of the device is easy and straight forward. The packaging includes a user guide with Q code that you point you’re your phone’s camera at and it will link you to the set-up procedures which includes a quick set up guide, app download and video tutorials. Do all this setup a Shot Scope account and you are ready to begin. The H4 charged in just under an hour. I did get about four 9 hole rounds out of a charge which was similar to my Bushnell Neo iON. I tend to be a battery watcher and probably could have gotten more out of it possibly. I did like that the device’s battery level indicator would change colors as the battery level depleted. Just another indicator which was nice. The Pro LX rangefinder has a simple set up as well. Pop in the included battery, select the mode and the display color.

     
    On-Course (4 out of 5 stars)
    The laser rangefinder is simple to use and locks onto the target more quickly than the Mileseey. I am a glasses wearer, and I had an issue with seeing a white halo around the field of view through the rangefinder while it doesn’t hinder performance it is noticeable. I also do not have the steadiest of hands and the device would take a few attempts to lock onto the flag. I have this issue with the Mileseey as well.
     The H4’s tracking is reliant on the operator to remember to tag the clubs. I was guilty of being too chatty sometimes on the course and would forget to tag the club I was using. But with the H4 on my belt it became routine to tag the club. It also was nice that the magnetic device on the GPS made it easier to mark the flag. I only had the H4 pop out of its holder twice during the review period. I am primarily a walker but did ride once and the H4 did mount to the post on the cart nicely but if you are shot tracking, I don’t find that to be practical. I also never mounted the H4 to the Pro LX range finder which looks like a nice feature but once again if you are shot tracking not practical. I don’t use the laser rangefinder on every shot. Mostly I use it on par 3 holes and when I am within 120 yards of the green. Anything more then I use the GPS
     The H4 is very straight forward to use but it did have issues around the greens. It would very often think I was putting when I was off the green chipping and getting to think otherwise is an issue. On my most recent round it had this problem on 4 consecutive holes. On the 5th consecutive hole, it never thought I was on the green even after tagging my putter. All in all, I did like using the H4 for tracking. I would rate this over the Arccos for two reasons, shot tagging and annual subscription. The Arccos required you to carry your phone for shot detection and would often miss shots and then I had to ‘earn” my ability to use it with my Apple watch. They did come out with a purchasable Link but that is $150. Any shots missed by the H4 would be purely my fault. Shot Scope is adding metrics. During this test I received an email that they added “Shots Plotted”. With H4 just purchase the device and without any annual subscription or additional hardware you can track your shots and get your performance metrics.

    The Good, the bad, the in between (3 out of 5 stars)
     The good is very good. You get a lot for $349. A good laser rangefinder, a very good GPS and shot tracking with metrics without an annual subscription. For me the bad is the white halo in rangefinders viewer and the fact that my shakiness sometimes causes issues with acquiring the flag but for the price of the rangefinder, stabilization would certainly up the price. The other bad and probably the biggest bad is the H4’s getting confused around the greens at times. Some rounds that’s often others not so much. The in between is another me problem if I’m being honest, “remember to tag your clubs!” I also really enjoy the medal feature of the smartphone app. 

     
    Play it or Trade it? (5 out of 5 stars)
    The Pro LX+ will remain in my bag as I find it better than the products I had prior to this test. The laser rangefinder fits more comfortably in my hand, the GPS tracker display is superior to the Bushnell Neo iOn and the shot tracking does not require a subscription. Any missed shots are due to the operator and not the vagaries of the device as with the Arccos.
     Conclusion
    I would have zero hesitation recommending the Shot Scope Pro LX+ to anyone interested in knowing their yardage and wanting on course metrics. It is easy to use and does not detract from your enjoyment of the game. The Pro LX+ package gives metrics to improve your game. For me it really comes down to “Value for Money”.
    Final Score (27 out of 30 stars)
     
    Follow up 8/30/2022
    I played a couple of rounds since posting my review and had experienced for the first time the H4 not recognizing that I was on the green. Usually it finds the green before I need it. It seemed to have an easier time finding the green if I walked to the middle of the green and stood there for a bit. Will keep watching this. 🤔
     
     
  7. Like
    mynerds reacted to fixyurdivot in Stewart Q Follow Electric Caddie   
    Greetings Spies.  My name is Bill and I reside in southwest Montana. I'm ecstatic and honored to have been selected among the thousands of who applied to test the Stewart Q Follow Electric Caddie.  A HUGE THANK YOU to the folks at Stewart Golf and MyGolfSpy for providing this great testing opportunity!!  I find these forum-based product reviews to be very informative and meaningful.  Marketing claims are "put to the test" by fellow amateur players with no strings attached.  I have used these reviews as part of my recent equipment changes and will do my best to provide you all with a meaningful review of the Stewart Q Follow Caddie.

    Please check out my introduction/bio here.  
    So as many of you may know, through our discussions on the forum, my preferred mode of travel on the course is walking. 
    18th hole at Wine Valley during this years PNW Spy Meet-up.

    Unless the course does not allow walking, I rarely opt for an electric/gas cart. To be brutally honest, I just don't like bouncing around, getting in/out and traversing the fairway.  Further, many courses limit where power carts can go (i.e. 90 degree rule, off fairways altogether, and green approach areas).  I prefer the cadence that walking affords - allowing me to think about the upcoming shot (or blowing off steam from the previous shot 😊). If I want to stay in the shade of a tree line as the group makes its way down the fairway, or just mosey along enjoying the sights, I have that option. Plus, it's great exercise and helps keep me stay loose - especially on colder days. I recently upgraded from a Sun Mountain Speed Cart to a Caddy-Tek EZ-V8 (which I did an unofficial review on here). 
    I've seen some of the various electric walking carts on courses and always was interested in them. At 62 years of age, I'm still in pretty good shape but will admit that some course terrain is beginning to tax the legs and lungs a wee bit.  Having a multi-mode, powered push cart seems like a great option. So when I saw the opportunity to test the Stewart Q Follow Caddie, I was really excited. From what I've read, this looks to be an industry leader in lightweight, compact design, and follow/tracker technology.
    A few questions that immediately come to my mind and are of interest include;
    battery life and how much it drops off (or not) during a round or even 27 holes recharging time stability on side hills ability to power through heavy rough and uneven terrain do I have to switch out of follow mode when walking onto the greens and tees? how easy is it to drive/steer using the remote? and, ultimately for me, will having the powered functionality offer a seamless transition from my many years using a simple push-cart? If you have any specific questions or things you would like myself and other testers to investigate, please reach out to us and we'll do our best to cover them in our reviews. 
     
    Final Review - Stewart Q Follow Golf Trolley
     First Impressions (4 of 5 stars)
    Once again, I want to open this review with a HUGE Thank You to both Stewart Golf and MGS for providing us the opportunity to test/review the Stewart Q Follow Caddie.  I don't mind repeating myself in saying that these forum product reviews are of more value to me than most all other reviews I read.  In fact, now when I consider buying new golf products, I always check to see if a forum, Hit Squad, or both have been done when whittling down information leading to a buy or move on decision.
    My initial impression of this product was very well engineered and excellent build craftsmanship.  The shipping box was heavy duty and packing protection top notch. The packing arrangement makes for easy removal and, perhaps as important, easy to repack (I had the opportunity to test this out with our move to AZ).  Help instructions are in the right places - isn't that so often overlooked these days. My shipment had definitely seen some rough handling, and gave the protective packaging a serious test.


    Upon getting the cart out and unfolded, I was quite impressed by its look - which I would describe as quite modern, stylish, and sleek.  The "black carbon" version we received has some nice accents (wheel fenders) that give it just the right amount of "pop".


    Little details like pressed-fit, sealed wheel bearings, and cooling fins on the drive motor, are not features one would see on low end products.

    The key technology of the Stewart Q Follow is the Bluetooth follow mode. With that function selected, the cart is seeking the handheld pendant. When I first trialed this in the yard, it was without a bag on the cart, and I found the cart quite erratic.  At first, I thought it was due to not holding the pendant still (as in clipped to my belt) but, after getting the clubs aboard, the cart became quite steady.  It still makes some jerky direction changes but nothing excessive.  The bottom-line is that the follow technology works as advertised.  Soon into my third round, I began not really thinking about the cart too much and just felt confident my clubs would be within arm's reach when I got to my ball.
    Personally, I found trying to hook the pendant onto my belt or pants/shorts pocket each time I selected "follow" a pain.  Upon arriving at the ball, you can stay within the "no follow" zone, and it won't attempt to move to you.  But, on a several occasions, I would just get outside that range while setting up for the shot and the cart you suddenly swivel and move towards me. What worked best for me was simply carrying the pendant in my hand as I walked to my ball, then place it on my bag, take the shot, pick up the pendant and start walking.  My testing showed the carts steering to be nearly identical whether on my belt or in my hand.  I even swung the pendant around while watching and the carts steering was hardly affected at all.
     
    Aesthetics (5 of 5 stars)
    I really like the look of the cart. As I mentioned above, it has a very modern look with just enough bling in the right places. The light grey rubber handle inserts and bag strap, the exposed carbon fiber basket-weave fenders, grey wheel rims, and red inner wheel covers blend really well. Overall, it is quite compact folded up and not as large as one might think a "battery powered" cart would be.  

    The battery nest fits perfect and simply blends into the cart base for a streamline look.


    The Numbers (4 of 5 stars)
    Unlike the accuracy of a range finder or carry distance for clubs, this category for a bag cart is a bit challenging.  But, I will touch on a key thing that can definitely effect "one's numbers (scoring)" and that is fatigue.  I've used non-motorized golf push carts for the better part of 45 years and while their designs have evolved to make them more compact and feature rich, they still require manual labor.  As we get older, that effort becomes more and more noticeable.  On courses with significant elevation and slope changes, I've really started to notice that my stamina wanes as the holes roll along.  Add in some heat index and that just makes manual carts feel heavier with each passing yard.
    The rounds I have played using the Stewart Q Follow Caddie have significantly reduced the level of fatigue I feel as compared to my manual push cart. I cannot yet equate better scoring with the Stewart Q but it stands to reason that being less fatigued over the course of a round will more likely than not help ones scoring.

    On The Course (4.5 of 5 stars)
    The Stewart Q Follow worked better than I expected in both manual drive and follow modes. I say better than expected because I had visions of looking back for my clubs only to see them some distance back and off-track. I used the follow mode about 90% of the time and it always kept up with me.  With the exception of it finding a pothole as it left the cart path and falling over, it never had an issue.

    The first course I tested on had a really good mix of terrain. The carts paths are mostly gravel and some not so smooth.  There were plenty of bumps and lumps which did tend to knock the steering off course a bit, but the tracking technology did a very good job of making corrections.  It did get a bit jumpy at times when this happened, but nothing all that drastic. 
    While the cart does well going up hills, going down steep hills isn't so good - particularly if you walk at normal pace.  What I found worked was to just walk slow and kind of guide it along close behind. On a few grades, I noted the brakes having to engage to slow travel and skid the wheels. Of course the instructions suggest using manual steering and use of the handle in these situations, but what fun is that? 🙂.
    The course also had plenty of side hills and I purposely walk up the slopes and in a zig-zag manner to see how the tracking worked.  It did a good job making steering adjustments but definitely was working the two wheel motors pretty hard.  Still, I was quite impressed with its ability to keep up.

    The Good, the Bad, and the In-between (3.5 of 5 stars)
    The "good" points are:
    The cart is very compact folded up which will really help those driving cars with limited trunk space. It is very easy to unfold and refold once you get the sequence down. Battery life is as advertised. We received the 36 hole battery and, following each of my 18 hole rounds, the app showed close to 60% remaining. The battery app is easy to use and provides status whether connected to the cart or charging cords. The quick dis-engage design of the rear wheels, for full manual mode, is very easy.  Removing and replacing the battery is easy and the recharge time for it and the remote pendant as described in the user manual. The cart adjusts well to the players walking pace.  I found this really helpful when slowing down and "helping" the cart through odd terrain.  This even works on moderate downhill grades. Switching to manual/pendant steering is easy and one quickly gets the feel for how much left and right arrow is needed to make course adjustments. The cart had very ample torque and climbing power.  I took it up a few quite steep inclines and it had no problem.  The two "wheelie wheels" do a great job at keeping the cart from tipping over backwards.  The "bad" points are:
    The handle is a bit on the flimsy side.  On several holes with moderate contours around the greens and tees, I dis-engaged the rear wheels from the motor and pushed the cart.  I found the amount of flexing in the handle a little concerning.  When using my current cart, I sometimes will give it a pretty hefty shove going over curbs. I would be concerned about this handle holding up under similar situations. To be fair, maybe it will sustain way more flexure and stress than I think... but it just made me nervous. Storage is pretty much non-existent. I found myself really missing the mesh cargo net bag, storage tray, and zippered storage pocket on my current Caddy-Tek cart. For me, this was a big negative that affected scoring. The "In-between" points are:
    The cart folded is a bit heavy and I could see this maybe being an issue for older folks (even more so for women) lifting in/out of car trunks. It seems the "glide stop" mode should be the default.  The carts stops quite abruptly if this mode is not on, and I should think most users will want this on... so why not make it the default? The cart does work fine with lighter than optimum weight bags, but the tradeoff is that the cart tends to pop wheelies a bit more when starting off and when following up steeper inclines. Play it or Trade it? (4 of 5 stars)
    To be brutally honest, I'm on the fence on this one.  I walked one of my (new to me) courses today using my cart and was taking note of all the uneven surface changes I went through moving from greens to tees.  Most of the cart paths stand several inches higher than the ground and I could see myself having to do quite a bit of "helping" the Stewart Q cart through this - whether in follow or manual steering.  Staying on the concrete paths would be a solution but there are a good many more direct/shorter paths through packed gravel that the walking folks use. I need to get a few rounds in with it on the courses here to make this final decision.  I do think it will help reduce fatigue, especially on hot days, and that is a BIG incentive. While my Caddy-Tek cart is quite light and easy to push, I still feel it towards the end of rounds.  I'm definitely going to put the Stewart Q through more paces and testing here and see how it works out.
    One factor I'm interested in is battery life and and adverse effects of use and storage in hot climates - like Arizona hot in summer months. They recommend charging at near room temps, which is fine and doable, but what about use and storage in a garage that's near 100F?
    I'm quite sure I would not have spent the MSRP for this cart.  I had previously looked at battery powered, manual steer units and opted not to invest the $700 to $1000 for some of those. I do think the build quality and technology are excellent, and the follow mode a really helpful feature, but the price seems a bit high IMO.
    Conclusion
    In a nutshell, the Stewart Q Follow Caddie is the real deal and does what it was designed to do.  With the exceptions noted above and two key design aspects (weak handle and virtually no storage), the cart manual and follow steering modes work very well. It works well over moderately uneven terrain; gravel paths, over tree roots, and low curbs (say up to an inch).  Straight out of the box, the cart is assembled and, with the help of fantastic instructions, requires only a few base and handle movements to be ready to load your bag and head off to the tee.  After the round is done, the fold and store sequence is very easy and surprisingly compact.  It is a little on the heavy side and could be an issue for some lifting into and out of deep trunks. 
    The ability to quickly disengage both the rear wheels is great in the event of either the cart or pendant batteries running out, a system malfunction, or forgetting to bring the pendant with you (which I nearly did 😬 ). With the wheels disengaged, the cart feels very much like any other push cart.  It rolls along fine but keep in mind the weight of the battery will require expending a few more calories.  It's also worth noting that the handle is no where near as rigid as most carts and tends to twist/flex a bit if pushing forward over curbs, cart paths, etc.  There are other reviews on this product where handles breaking have happened - so just something to consider and remember when using.
    It seems to work well with various golf bags.  I used my Sun Mountain Four 5 kickstand bag and it had no issues.  Stewart Golf does recommend using a bit heavier bags to minimize "wheelies" during drive motor starts, but I did not find that an issue.  While perhaps not optimum, it's nice to know the cart can be used with a pretty wide range of bags.
    The $2699 to $3099 MSRP (depending on options) is pretty high as compared to other battery powered, manual pendant steer carts.  Because I'm not real familiar with the competing products, I won't try and justify the cost of this product except to say I think the Stewart Q Follow is a top-shelf product with respect to engineering and build quality.  
    I think the bottom-line is that if you really love to walk but are finding doing so with a manual push cart too taxing, and you want a high end, quality built cart with state-of-art follow mode feature, the Stewart Q Follow should definitely be on your list.  I must say that the follow mode is quite cool.  Simply walking from shot to shot with "Stewey" tagging along and having your clubs there when you get to the ball could be habit forming.
    Thank you for reading this review.  Be sure to check out the "comments" section with the many posts we testers made chronicling our experiences using this product.  Also, check in periodically as myself and the other testers will be adding more findings in the comments section as we get more experience using the product.  
    Final Score (25 out of 30 stars)
     
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    mynerds reacted to edingc in Edel SMS Wedges   
    Edel SMS Wedges – Official MGS Forum Review by edingc
    Introduction - May 28, 2022
    A full introduction can be found in the comments section.

    A big thank you to Edel and MyGolfSpy for another outstanding testing opportunity.
    My name is Cody and, if you ask my wife, I am obsessed with golf. I practice or play almost every day when the weather permits. Living in West Michigan is a golfer’s dream with many beautiful courses and practice facilities. My handicap hovers in the upper-mid single digits with my distance being the strength of my game. My length means I hit a number of full and partial wedges throughout my rounds.
    I will be testing the Edel SMS wedges with the following specifications, per my fitting at Club Champion:
    50 degrees, 54 degrees, 58 degrees Standard Loft/Length/Lie V Grind Weight in Toe Nippon Modus3 Wedge 125 I have access to a short game area, a practice range and my indoor garage bay equipped with a FlightScope Mevo+ launch monitor and Titleist RCT golf balls. My plan is to put the Edels through their paces on course, on the practice area and in my garage bay. Specifically, a few areas I am most concerned about are turf interaction, ball flight/shape and wet weather performance. 
    Final Review - July 25, 2022
    Crazy how fast time flies when you're having fun! We received our clubs over a month ago (full unboxing post here), and I've had a blast with the Edels on both the course and practice range. I was able to get the wedges out for 10 18-hole rounds, eight 9-hole rounds, a scramble and at least 15 trips to the range/practice area. I even played an entire nine holes with nothing but the wedges and my putter.
    First Impressions - 4/5 Stars



    The quality of the Edel wedges is evident by the fit and finish of the packaging and the clubs themselves. From the securely-packed, suitcase-style shipping box to the hand-turned ferrules, the bespokeness of the SMS wedges is obvious.
    Edel promotes the weight system as a means to ensure the best possible fit for an individual’s swing type. The weight positions allow them to fit for any type of swing, shallow to steep. Edel claims a combined 44 percent increase in accuracy in distance and lateral dispersion.
    I am very impressed by the Edel experience. Chris Koske, Edel’s Chief Marketing Officer, helped schedule my fitting and took my order via email. That was a very nice touch. It made me feel like they cared about their customers more so than a larger OEM might.
    I’m removing a star from this area for two reasons:
    There were some differences in what each tester received inside their shipment. I received a card detailing how to self-fit the wedges but some of the other testers did not. I did not receive stickers. Some of the other testers did. It seems odd to me at this price point to not include a tool to change the weights alongside the self-fitting card. Aesthetics, Sound and Feel - 5/5 Stars


    This is a very subjective area of the review. To my eyes the SMS wedges are some of the most beautiful wedges available. While the milled sole is not unique to Edel, the combination of the sole, modern branding, custom ferrules and a chrome finish makes for a stunning golf club. 

    I prefer the look of the slightly rounded leading edge. It makes me confident I won’t lay sod over the ball if I catch it heavy. The matte face sets itself against the polished hosel and back. The squared off, almost full face grooves are unique and act as a nice alignment aid as well.
    The wedges are minimalist enough as to not draw attention. You really start to appreciate the whole package once the details like the sole milling and the diamond texture on the face reveal themselves.

    After an adjustment period, the Edel wedges feel great. As a Japanese 1025 carbon steel forging, they have a very soft feeling when hit on or around the sweet spot. There is still plenty of feedback, and I can readily tell my strike location, however.
    I play a firmer golf ball (Snell MTB-X), but impact with the SMS wedges produce a nice solid thwack sound. Only when moving to range rocks could I describe some shots as producing a harsh clicking sound and feel.
    The Numbers - 4/5 Stars


    The heaviest weight has been in the toe throughout my testing per my fitting. The weight placement has resulted in consistent impact and shots. I haven’t wanted to move it around.

    My left-to-right dispersion is predictable. I used to be capable of big left misses even with a wedge in my hand. My left miss has almost completely disappeared. I most often miss the ball to the right now, which is a much better miss in most circumstances.

    I hit the SMS wedges very consistent distances that fit my gapping. They have a nice high flight for me with a stock full swing. However, these wedges seem to love partial swings. I’ve made an effort to hit partial shots more often as a means to combat wind. On full swings into the breeze I’ve noticed I can get too much spin which results in a ballooning and short shot.
    The weight in the toe does make a noticeable difference. I can feel the face wanting to stay open longer through the swing. I have had some struggles with full swing wedges staying too open. This results in the right/short miss I mentioned above.
    Make no mistake, these wedges are still a solid forging and do punish balls that miss the center by too much.
    On Course - 5/5 Stars


    The Edels made an immediate impact on the golf course. I quickly felt comfortable with the wedges on partial shots around greens. The toe weight helped my short game because it became so effortless to hit high, soft shots. I never had that kind of short game shot in my repertoire before bagging the Edels.

    The V grind is the perfect choice for my swing and course conditions. I can tell there is a lot more trailing edge bounce on the V grind than on other wedges I’ve used in the past. It is a wonderful grind for the softer conditions I usually play on. On firmer lies, the trailing edge bounce glides along the ground giving me a ton of confidence.
    Wet weather performance has been more than adequate for my needs. I still seem to be getting plenty of spin even when the clubface and ball are both wet with morning dew.
    I am not as comfortable with full swings as I was with my previous wedges. That has required a small strategy change on course to hit more partial wedges. I'm still practicing at getting better in that area.

    ShotScope confirms an improvement in my short game since putting the Edels in the bag. Over the past 15 rounds I’ve gained 0.04 strokes in my short game over a scratch golfer. Those 15 rounds include a mix of rounds with the Edels and my previous wedges. Over my past 10 rounds with Edels only, I’ve gained 0.62 strokes in my short game over a scratch golfer. That’s a big improvement!
    The Good, The Bad, The In Between - 4/5 Stars


    Don’t overlook the endless grind/loft combinations. Edel offers all four grinds in every loft. Add on the weights and there is endless customization. For me, finding the right grind/weight combination made a big difference.
    I do think the Edels are not wedges you would want to buy off the rack without a good fitting. It is also concerning to me that each of our authorized fitters seemed to approach the fittings in different ways.
    Play it or Trade it? - 5/5 Stars


    The Edels are in the bag. Period. Combined with a lesson taken a day before receiving the clubs, I’ve played some of the best golf of my life this summer. As of this writing my unofficial handicap has dropped from around nine at the start of the testing to below six. My improved short game caused a lot of that improvement.

    While the Edels are priced above their major OEM competitors (and much more than some smaller brands), there is a lot of value in the fitting options. I have no doubt the multitude of loft, weight and grind combinations could fit every type of golfer.
    Conclusion

    Edel’s swing match weighting system is a unique feature not found on other wedges. The Edel SMS wedges lived up to the marketing hype during my review period. They have helped me drop two strokes from my handicap since putting them in the bag.
    The seemingly endless combinations of loft, weight location and grinds mean a golfer can expect to get a wedge tailored especially to their swing. I would consider the Edel SMS wedges to be a must try for anyone who is looking into a new set of wedges, especially if one can locate an authorized Edel fitter near them.
    Final Score - 27/30 Stars
  9. Like
    mynerds reacted to xOldBenKenobiX in Edel SMS Wedges   
    Edel SMS Wedges – Official MGS Forum Review by xOldBenKenobiX
    Introduction – May 31, 2022
    First and foremost a huge thank you to Edel and MyGolfSpy for another awesome testing opportunity.

    My name is Elson, and I am golf addict, I have been playing golf for about 12 years now, born and raised in Brazil, I honestly don’t play and practice as much as I would like to. I have been calling Southeast Michigan home for the past 15 years, and really enjoy the many courses that our area and the Northwest Ohio area have to offer. My wife has accepted that she loses me for a few months during the summer. I am a high handicapper, and my numbers will vary from the high teens to the mid-20s depending on how often I can play.

    I will be testing the Edel SMS wedges, my specs are as it follows:
    Ø  48, 54 and 60 degrees
    Ø  Standard Loft/Lie + ¼ inch length
    Ø  T Grind
    Ø  Standard 2g weights on the edges and 8g on the center
    Ø  Shafted with a KBS Hi-Rev 2.0 - R 115g with a standard size Golf Pride Tour Velvet grip
    Currently I do not have a suitable testing area at home for wedge practice and testing, nor I own a Sim/Shot tracer equipment, however I do have a few golf courses nearby with good range/short game are to practice at. Also, there is a new X Golf location down the street from me to where I can go and test with a full Sim and test spin rates.
    Overall, I want to test these wedges with my regular game, and see how they perform, or how can I make them perform.
    The main measure of testing here is if they can help me save strokes, more greens in regulation and such. As any new clubs I expect these to be different than what I am used to play with and to see some good differences with the spin rates and shot shapes. Edel is one of the companies to which I have never held one of their clubs before, just saw pictures and videos and I think it will be awesome to play with it.
    I am very excited for this testing as my wedges are the oldest clubs in my bag right now and were never fit for my game. My short game is also a weak part of my game and one that I would love to see improve. With that being said, I cannot express how excited I am about testing these wedges.
    Final Review - July 25, 2022
    First Impressions  ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐
    My first impression of those was that they are very well made, from the clubs I tested during my fitting to the clubs I receive, the craftsmanship on those is simply great, I love the looks of the clubs.

    I love the looks at address and really enjoyed the overall looks of the clubs.

    The head looks very compact at address, and with a very nice look at address. The full-face grooves are great, allowing for mishits to still be struck within the groves, hence the mishits were not so punishing to me.
    Edel claims that this wedge can be up to 44% more accurate, I can say that personally I did see an improvement with my shots, not up to 44%, but I was able to keep more balls in the green, and get it closer to the flag overall, despite not experimenting with moving the weight around I do still think that the moveable weights are a great advantage for better players who can shape the ball flight one way or another, and who want to have that set as a default shot shape with the weights.

     
    Unfortunately, at my current skill level, I do not shape the call at demand and honestly prefer to have my ball flight as straight as possible.
    Aesthetics  ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐
    I was fit for the T grind across the board, the tripe sole design allows for some versatility when using the wedge. These feature the traditional pear shape from address.
    The logo is not too distracting when looking at the bottom of the club as well the T grind information, I think if wanted the bottom of the club would be a prefect canvas to add some lovely personal touches, I did not get these wedges customized, but I can see a lot of potential with the available customization.

    As I mentioned before, I do like the overall looks of this wedge, I think the overall package was well put together, these are not flashy, but very noticeable when sitting in the bag.

    Comparing these with other wedges of similar price, I think that these wedges are spot on with their looks, maybe not as a such refined looks as a Vokey, but they do look good on their own way.
    These wedges sound good, they are not too loud and give a feeling of softness when they are hit, when swinging through the rough and grass in general, these sounded soft and not distracting, very pleasing, even swinging from the sand did not yield any loud or displeasing sound.
    My mishits still ended up with some good overall results, knowing my game, other clubs where I know the mishits would generate a very bad result, severe miss, and such, with these, the misses where not as bad, and in general I got the ball closer to my intended target.
    My worse hit with this clubs was a bad chunked toe hit, that pretty much caused the ball to go sideways, however this one was on my swing not the club, as for the best, I did get a lovely high shot over the trees into the green after putting my tee shot on the rough in front of the next tee box, this shot went exactly how I had pictured in my mind, and it felt really good to be able to hit that shot with the confidence that I would pull it off, especially because I know that I hit a lot more bad shots than good ones.
    As for the normal mishits, hitting it thin would get me a longer shot than I wished for, but nonetheless close to my intended line.
    With my chunky shots, I did experience the normal last of distance, but still following my intended line.
    With the mishits and non-square to the face shots, I did see some side traction, but not as bad as my old wedges.
    The Numbers⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐
    I did not had a chance to take these wedges to a sim and test out the numbers, however as for real life play, I did notice that my shot dispersion was a little better, I did notice that on the shorter shots 100 yards and less, where I usually struggle a lot, I did indeed have better results and have hit more greens or with the misses, I got it closer to the green.
    As for my distances if hitting the wedges with a full shot these are the numbers I have averaged.
    For my 48 degrees, I was hitting between 95 to 105 yards.
    For the 54 degrees, I was hitting between 75 and 85 yards.
    As for the 60 degrees, I was hitting between 55 and 65 yards.
    The trajectory of my shots was a mid to high flight.
    As I previously mentioned the mishits were not as punishing as my older wedges, especially as these ones had been fitted to my game.
    Dead center hits were very pleasant and yield good shots, with the toe and heel shots, indeed the shots would go right and left of the target, not as far offline as I would hit with my old wedges, I noticed that when I try to recreate the same shots with both the old and new wedges, the Edel wedges gave me a much closer proximity to the the hole as well as to the green.
    Shooting similar wedges on the range I took 10 shots with each wedge and its comparable old wedge that I had in the bag, the shots were post warm up, and I was feeling loose enough for all of them.
    Wedge
    Shot distance
    Hole average Distance
    Edel 48
    30 Yards Chip shots
    32 feet
    Vokey 48
    30 Yards Chip shots
    41 feet
    Edel 54
    20 Yards Chip shots
    25 feet
    Vokey 52
    20 Yards Chip shots
    29 feet
    Edel 60
    15 Yards Chip shots
    12 feet
    Vokey 58
    15 Yards Chip shots
    21 feet
    That is quite a noticeable difference with the distance, especially with the shorter shots, I had a couple of the 15 Yard chips where I nearly holed them out.
    As for the full shots on the range, unfortunately I had to do more of a visual evaluation as I could not walk down the range and measure each individual shot from its landing spot compared to the target line.
    Due to having a steep angle of attack, I naturally hit shots to the right.
    Mind you, most of my misses are to the right, and once again after warming up and with a good rest break between sets, I hit 10 balls with each wedge.
    Again, this was the hardest part to estimate during the test.
    Wedge
    Shot Distance
    Estimated deviation to the target line
    Edel 48
    100 Yards full shot
    15 Yards
    Vokey 48
    100 Yards full shot
    30 Yards
    Edel 54
    75 Yards full shot
    10 Yards
    Vokey 52
    75 Yards full shot
    25 Yards
    Edel 60
    60 Yards full shot
    10 Yards
    Vokey 58
    60 Yards full shot
    15 Yards
    I wish I have had the chance to take these to a Sim and gotten numbers that way, but between the bad knees, sprained wrists and ankles, the past few weeks have made my outings much harder.
    I did prefer to spend the limited time I had in real golf conditions, and oh boy did they deliver during that play.
    On the Course⭐⭐⭐⭐
    I have noticed that on my course play, I have used the 60 degrees wedge a lot more than the 48 and 54, as for my last round, I found myself trying to fit usage of the wedges, maybe a little too much, looking at the opportunities had and the distances I knew I could hit the wedges comfortably, I hit some shots that I knew I did not have the distance with a wedge, so on the next shot I would have a chance to hit a different wedge.
    If I was approaching a green and the distance left was between 110 and 125 yards, I would still hit the 48 degrees wedge, so I would have a chance to hit the 60 degrees for my next shot, that is because I wanted to hit as many shots as I could with these, and I honestly contemplated, yet I did not, play the shorter par 4s with wedges only, I might do that in a future round as my home course of Taylor Meadows, have a lovely stretch from the 8th to the 10th hole that are shorter yet challenging with water in play on all 3 holes.
    8 playing downhill 309 yards
    9 playing downhill with water to the right the entire way 281 yards
    And the 10 with a new Pond guarding the front left of the green is the shortest at only 256 yards.
    The only area that I truly had an issue was with Sand traps, both during my range sessions and the actual course play, I had a real hard time getting out of them, but I cannot fault the wedge, that is my game and the flaws I have with it.
    I hoped that the new wedges would be a magic bullet, but that was not realistic.
    Where I play most of the bunkers are of heavy compact sand with a very low sand dept, these are the type of bunkers that only really have 3 inches of sand than it is the hard soil below.
    I noticed that despite missing the green from the sand, either long or very short, the wedge glided through the sand with no issues, despite most of the times me taking a steep swing that really dug into the sand.
    I felt confident every time I had the wedges on my hands and that is one of the best characteristic of these.

     

     
    I quite honestly really loved playing these wedges and cannot really say any bad things about it, maybe because these were such an improvement from my old mix and match set of vokeys.
    These have impacted my game in a positive way, these had bee
    n optimized to give me the best spin rate and flight.

    I had never had an Edel product on my hands, and I got to say, I am impressed with the over engineering of these clubs, the fact that you can move the weight around and adjust the ball flight is the type of thing that I would expect from a driver, not really from an wedge, but to have the option is one of those tools that is a great one to have on your bag.
    I would love to see more of the moveable weight technology, I love to see where Edel will take those and what it becomes of it, that technology being integrated to their new SMS irons shows Edel’s commitment to the technology.
    The Good, the Bad, the Inbetween⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐
    The good, these wedges are awesome, and the technology behind them is very impressive.
    The bad, and my bad on these, I feel that even though I am not a very tall person, the wedges feel short, the 35 inches for the 60 degree, the 35..25 for the 54 and 35.5 for the 48th, have me squatting down a little more than what I feel comfortable with, but that is something I can get addressed later and have an inch added to each one of them.
    Play it or Trade it? ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐
    These are a play it for me, these wedges have improved my game, and indeed it has been a such short time and I think a few more rounds of play will help me get even more accustomed to these wedges, but I do like what I have experienced so far.
    The main measure of success for me with these wedges is confidence, I have gained confidence on hitting different shots around the green and know that I can pull of those shots.
    I think that everyday golfers like myself benefit from these wedges, as they show a great deal of forgiveness and playability.
    I think as I use these and get more comfortable with them, my short game will improve.
    Conclusion
    Edel has brought forward a great set of wedges, the technology behind these is impressive, the fact that one can customize your shot shapes with the moveable weights is a big plus.
    The exceptional forgiveness and workability of these jump out at you as an advantage with these.
    As my personal experience, again the word here is confidence, these felt very good on my hands and did improve me game, I have hit a lot more of good shots than I did bad shots with these wedges than my old ones.
    Final Score 29 out of 30 Stars
     

     
  10. Like
    mynerds got a reaction from revkev in Spornia SPG8 XL Net   
    Sporina SPG-8 XL Net – Official MGS Forum Review by mynerds
    Introduction - May 31, 2022
    A full introduction can be found in the comments section.
    Thank you to Sporina and MyGolfSpy for this amazing testing opportunity!
    Hello! My name is Mark, I am a high-handicap player near Chicago and have played golf mostly in social contexts like Top Golf and par 3 courses for a few decades. I am a natural righty, but golf lefty. By day, I work as a cybersecurity consultant. By night, I am husband, dad, and fur-dad to these three:

    My daily schedule is chaotic with both my wife and I juggling full-time jobs and chasing around our sassy toddler, so I am not always in control of when I get to practice.  When I can find time to get to the range, I find myself trying to “get my money’s worth” and hit as many balls as possible even when slower, shorter, deliberate practice would be more beneficial. I will be testing the net both indoors and outdoors, and tracking any discernible improvement to my golf game that regular, frequent practice may bring.
    I’m extremely excited to test the Sporina SPG-8 XL Net and have high expectations given the SPG-7’s status as MGS’ Best Golf Hitting Net 2021.
    First Impressions (4 out of 5)
    My full first impressions can be found in the comments section.
    The shipping weight of the product is 30lbs. For reference, below is the package up against my sedan and all 5'10" of my wiry self with the unboxed net in the carrying bag.



    My first point of inspection was the quality of stitching on the bag. Unfortunately I spotted areas with less-than-stellar stitching and several spots with loose or frayed threads:

    I also inspected the quality of the roof pole channel which was a weak point for the SPG-7. It was the thinnest material on the SPG-8 by far - even thinner than the material for the bag. Despite the thinness of the material, the roof pole channel did not tear though I did find threading the roof pole challenging.
    Taped to the outside of the box in a "packing slip" container was not a packing slip but instead a supplemental instruction and warning that "the spring steel opens forcefully" and that set up should occur "far away from people vehicles, and structures." Typos galore aside, this warning should be heeded.



    Minus one star for the stitching issues and the thin roof pole channel material, despite its previously documented weakness.
    Aesthetics (5 out of 5)
    With everything set up, it became clear that the "XL" is no misnomer. It is difficult to adequately describe how imposing this thing is.

    There are a few temporary hitting nets in my neighbors’ yards. To me, other nets seem like toys and the SPG-8 seems more like a tool. I love the look of the net and didn’t mind leaving it out for prolonged periods of time. Even as a "portable" net, I wanted to minimize my setup time. I shared some details on how I’ve left the net mostly assembled while retaining my garage parking space in the comments.


    The Numbers (3 out of 5)
    At the beginning of the test, I expected the SPG-8 to catch every single ball. Unfortunately, it did not meet this expectation. I kept count of every single ball that I hit, balls which were caught but bounced out of the net, and balls that missed the net entirely. Out of 600 balls hit, 27 (4.5%) were caught but bounced out of the net, and 2 missed the net entirely. Further, 3 balls were caught by the net but still managed to contact the wall behind it, more than a foot away. While the wall was not damaged, there are small indentations and marks on the drywall.

    Video.mov
    Spornia lists “Ball rolls gently down not touching the floors” as a “main feature” of the product. They make smaller nets (presumably for better players) and, as their largest and most expensive option, I expected it to contain all my shots. Minus 1 star each for the ~5% of balls that bounced out of the net, and for the balls that missed the net entirely.
    On the Course (5 out of 5)
    Did use of the net translate to improvements on the course? I’ve gained confidence in my irons, improved my dispersion, and am carrying the ball 15 yards further than a month ago. Here is Rapsodo's analysis of a session using my 9i compared from a month ago (left) to this week (right).

    In terms of results, I played my personal best round at the local municipal 9-hole and (using the WHS adjusted gross score) broke 50 there for the first time and had my first true par on a par-4.
    While the performance gains are a product of several things (see the next section), the net was the catalyst for bringing all the pieces together. Without question, I would not have seen these same improvements without the net.
    The Good, the bad, the inbetween (3 out of 5)
    By itself, I don’t believe any net alone is enough to improve your game. To achieve its full value, I needed to also purchase a launch monitor, quality hitting mat, and follow at home lessons/drills. Before purchasing the launch monitor specifically, I was developing bad habits hitting into the net that I only recognized once I was on the range. Once the launch monitor was in hand, I was able to recognize my mistakes and work towards correcting them.
    Minus one star against Spornia’s main feature claim of “get instant feedback on your shots” – it just wasn’t true for me.
    A quick note on the chipping net – I ended up using it only once. I already owned a small chipping net and if I’m working on my wedges, I’m just not going to spend the time attaching the Spornia net to the SPG-8. No fault of Spornia there, it just isn’t an important feature of the net to me.
    The testers also fielded a few questions to customer support via MGS to clarify the purpose of white strap on the net, the Velcro straps, how to use the support ropes, and whether we were missing tie down stakes. Minus one star for unclear instructions and lack of customer service response. I’ll update with any future communications though.
    Lastly, after getting used to the setup and takedown process I was able to reduce my setup time to 1:04 without the roof net and 3:17 with the roof net. Threading the roof channel really is the weakest aspect of the net.


    Play it or Trade it? (5 out of 5)
    Without question, I will be playing with the SPG-8 for the remainder of the season and am looking forward to its use indoors over the long Chicago winters. I will continue to improve my hitting area and hope to add heaters and possibly a projector to create a true indoor hitting simulator. Where breaking 100 seemed like a lofty goal 6 months ago, now breaking 90 seems like a potential goal for next year. Without this net, I don't believe that goal would be possible.
    Conclusion (25 out of 30 stars)
    Overall, the Spornia SPG-8 XL edition lives up to its name as an extra large hitting net. While the extra foot of coverage may benefit high handicappers like me who struggle with the occasional extremely off-center shot, even the XL edition missed a few of my shots that would have ended up in neighbors yards had I been outside at the time.
    If you’re in the market for a hitting net, I would recommend the SPG-8 only if 1) cost isn’t your highest priority or 2) if you’re looking to use it as part of a golf simulator with their projector-friendly target sheet. Otherwise, I would recommend the SPG-7 instead, and use any cost savings towards a high quality hitting mat and/or indoor launch monitor for a complete at-home hitting experience.
  11. Like
    mynerds reacted to Grand Stranded in L.A.B. DF2.1 Putter   
    INTRODUCTION
    So, here we go! First things first… my name is John, and I’m 67 years old. I moved from Long Island to N. Myrtle Beach about 12 years ago, and live in a community with 4 golf courses, two driving ranges and short game practice areas. We also have 3 practice greens.
    Here’s how I would break down my game… driver is solid. I’m longer than most guys in my age group I play with, and I’m pretty accurate. FWs are a struggle. I can hit my 3 wood very well off the tee, but off the turf it’s an adventure. Hybrids on the other hand are a strength. So much so that I recently switched from a set of PXG XP irons I really liked to a set of Launcher XL Halo hybrid style irons. As much as I loved the PXGs, I want as much help as I can possibly get from my iron game, because… my wedge game is that of a +20 cap player. It’s what has always kept me from single digits. My putting on the other hand is the biggest strength of my game, imo. I have total confidence in my ability to not only putt well, but do so in pressure situations. (that might sound like a brag, but I firmly believe that in order to be a good putter, you have to convince yourself you already are… I hope that makes sense?)
    I chose the DF2.1 over the Mezz my fitter suggested, because I felt I wanted to experience all the tech L.A.B. has to offer. I also wanted to try a mallet style putter, and this looks like it’s about as extreme a version as there is out there.
    I’ve done a lot of research on this putter since being chosen to test it, and the tech behind it makes sense to me. I’m looking forward to not only trying something new, but answering any questions you guys have about the product. 
    One last thing… I’ve said this before, and I’m sure every other tester has also, but I’m incredibly grateful to have been chosen for this test. I want to thank MGS, L.A.B., my buddy Rob, and also give a shout out to Tony for his help and patience with us in our private testers thread. 

    FIRST IMPRESSION
    The box was… big, and when I opened the top of it, I was staring at the biggest putter headcover I’ve ever seen, 😂. The putter itself was packed extremely well, and after I unwrapped it and took off the headcover the head looked huge. Surprisingly though, after rolling a few balls on the carpet  it seemed normal to me.
    AESTHETICS
    The build of this putter is very high quality. The combination of the DF2.1 head and the BGT Stability Tour shaft is seamless, and I love the way the lettering on the shaft is shadowed in black to match the shaft itself. The one issue I had was the Press 3 grip. The half white half black combo took away from the murdered out look the putter otherwise had. It also felt awkward right from the start. (more on that later).
    In summation, my first impression was very good. I purposely chose the putter that would be as far out of my comfort zone as possible, and this was certainly that. I was ready to go on my first adventure with a mallet style putter.
    THE NUMBERS
    I don’t feel 8 or so rounds of golf are a good base to establish any real reference point as far as seeing any real improvement. First, the style of head and the grip took some time to get used to. I’ve never played a mallet, nor used such an oversized grip. Second, throughout the roughly 3-4 week testing period, the greens I played went from very hard and fast, to aerated, then very wet and slow as we’ve now entered our rainy season.
    I will say I’ve become more and more comfortable and dare I say confident after what was a very rocky start.
    ON THE COURSE 
    I need to preface this by saying I was unable to play for almost two months, and my very first round back, I threw the DF2.1 into the fire. Looking back now, I think that was unfair. Not only was I easing my way back from injury, I was expecting this brand new club to work magic and be the most critical scoring club in my bag right from Day One, when I hadn’t putted at all for so many weeks..
    I definitely had issues taking the DF2.1 from the practice green to the course. As soon as I did, the grip went from feeling awkward to unwieldy I also struggled to set the sole flat without altering my stance. In short, I was a basket case. I went from leaving everything short, to hammering them well past the hole. 
    After my third round with it, i had what was the worst day putting I can remember having. How bad? I missed the ball completely twice in a row from just off the green on a par 3. Both times I went right over the top of the ball. My playing partners thought I was making practice strokes, and when I told them I had whiffed both times and the strokes counted, they went into hysterics. That my friends, has never happened to me on a full swing, never mind a putt, so yeah, I was at my wits end.
    As is often the case with golf though, things change. We can go from the highest of highs to to the lowest of lows very quickly, and never know why (at least I don’t). I wanted to give up and go back to my old putter, but I believe in the tech in this putter. I believe the head is forgiving and I believe in the idea of keeping that head square throughout the stroke, so I had a long talk with myself, and went the other direction.. instead of taking it out of my bag, I played rounds of 9, 18, 18, 9 and 9 in the 5 days after my “fiasco”. I’m starting to stack good days with it now, but most importantly, I’m trying to not over think the grip.
     Our greens roll very fast, and I had to trust the DF2.1 to get my ball to the hole with what feels like a very soft stroke. The grip is beginning to feel more natural, and Ironically, I’m finding myself fidgeting less with my hand position than I think I did with my standard size one. It still doesn’t feel perfect, but I’m starting to see results I can’t deny. I’d love to roll this putter with say, a RoseMark or Super Stroke 1.0… I think either combo would be a weapon for me.
    THE GOOD THE BAD THE IN BETWEEN
    The Good... I love the fact that I had a small part of designing this putter. Picking our head type, sight line, color, shaft, and even head cover make each of these feel like truly our own.
    The Bad… as a lefty, I’m used to having limited selections with all types of equipment, but if I could make one suggestion to the good folks at LAB it would be to upgrade your grip game. For all the options you offer, the lack of choices here really stood out. 
    The in between… I honestly can’t think of anything to put here, other than I’ve gone from a really tough start with this putter, to a gradual adjustment to it, and am only now starting to feel a sense of confidence with it. Hopefully this continues, as I really think there’s potentially something special here.
    TRADE IT OR KEEP IT
    Anyone who has followed this thread knows I’ve been the Debbie Downer of this review process. It frustrated me no end that I was seemingly the only one here who wasn’t immediately in love with their new L.A.B. Putter. It’s been quite the journey, but I’m starting to come around. 
    If you asked me a week or two ago, my answer would’ve been Trade, but not now. I’m getting more comfortable with it every day. I have faith in the technology (although I might have to look into whether a grip change is possible and still keep the angle the same). I’m not only becoming comfortable with it, I think I’m on the verge of a breakthrough here. I’m starting to expect to make everything I look at. 😉 
    There is not a more personal club than a putter. I always felt I knew right away whether I would like one or not. In the past 15 years, I’ve used a Yes! Tracy for 14, and a Double Wide Odyssey for 1 1/2. To say going to the DF2.1 was a shock to my system is putting it mildly. Those who have read the thread know what I’m talking about…
    CONCLUSION
    Before I wrap this up, I want to mention the LAB Online Fitting Process, as it was a part of the review. As most of you know by now, we sent in 5 second videos of our stroke, and we were fit to length and lie angle. I’ve already beaten this horse to death in the review thread, so I will just say this… these putters aren’t cheap. I believe they go for $549 stock. You can go very close to $1,000 very easily with custom shafts and such. If I’m going to spend that kind of money on a putter, I want to see and demo each of their models in person. I want to see and be taken step by step through the fit. I want to see and feel the grip options available.
    I’m sure Sam and his fitters know what they’re doing, and I’m only speaking for myself here, but I would never buy any putter blind, much less one that in their own words, is so “out of the box”. It just doesn’t make any sense to me. Go to a place where you can roll one of these. Try the shafts, and the grips, then decide. They make a great product, but you should make sure it’s the right one for you.
    TOTAL SCORE
    26/30
     
  12. Like
    mynerds reacted to B_R_A_D_Y in L.A.B. DF2.1 Putter   
    My Introduction
    https://forum.mygolfspy.com/tests/40-lab-df21-putter/?do=findComment&comment=9053
    First Impressions
    https://forum.mygolfspy.com/tests/40-lab-df21-putter/?do=findComment&comment=9647
     
     Looks like an old-fashioned bottle opener to me. 
    Aesthetics and Reactions from other golfers
    "It’s Big" - Response of 80% of People Who I Showed it to
    I knew that someone had read about this putter whenever they echoed the words, “looks like a branding iron.”
    Yes, it is big. Although, I was around when PING irons first came on the scene. When everything else was a blade, they seemed massive. One old boy used to say, “You could dig up potatoes with them things,” meaning they looked like a hoe.
    And then Big Bertha appeared on the scene. “It’s huge," everyone exclaimed. Not by today’s standards though. So while the Directed Force (DF) is indeed larger, it means to me exactly what PING and Big Bertha meant back then … better performance and an increased margin of error.
    "It Sounds Different" - A Youtube Reviewer Mentioned this, too
    I couldn’t wait to try this club, so I grabbed 3 random balls and went to the practice green. First ball I hit, the club let out a distinctive ping. I’m old enough to remember the original PING 1A putter and it was named PING because of the ping sound it emitted. (Take a look at the L.A.B. B2 ... it resembles the original PING 1A) Turns out the first ball I tried was a Topflight. The other 2 balls were softer, a Titleist and a Callaway which did not ping near as loudly. So the harder the ball is, the louder the ping. It is a non-issue to me, because I don’t even hear it anymore.
    "It’s too Light" - Immediate Response from a Golfer
    I had not realized how light this DF configuration was until I picked up my Spider EX. There was a noticeable difference. I bought that Spider cuz I wanted a heavier putter head than my old PING Anser. Maybe it was lucky that I never compared the putters until after I had been using the DF for a week. By then I didn’t care that my old favorite felt heavier. I definitely can see that head weight does not make a difference in performance. I actually think it’s easier to hit the DF 2.1 on really long putts. I thought I wanted that weight for those long putts … but the DF proved me wrong.
    By the way, the guy who said it was too light never even hit a putt with it. His loss.
    "Is that a L.A.B. Putter" - Response from Several Golfers
    While I was on the putting green a guy yelled over from the first tee, “Is that a L.A.B. putter?” Another person caught me on the chipping green, without the putter, asking if I was the guy with the L.A.B. And I also heard a few times that guys had a friend who played one. People have heard about this putter,
    "That’s a Lot of Lines" - Response from Several Golfers
    I love these lines. I set it down, align it to my target, and feel fully confidant that I’m right.
    "The Grip is Fantastic" - Response from Several Golfers
    I love this grip ... the soft tackiness and the way it fits my hand. Several other people echoed these sentiments exactly.
    "How Can You Putt off the Toe if it’s Not Dead" - A Collegiate Player
    As I touted the benefits of the soft feel of the ball leaving the face and the fact that toe hits don't lose momentum, a young college golfer said that he needs to have a dead hit on the toe, so he can putt a fast downhill slopping green. Sounds like something I heard when I was his age.
    Off-center putts are so soft I don't really feel them ... and they definitely don't lose momentum. I set this putter up on the line I want, and then think of nothing else except pacing. I don’t care if I miss the center of the face because I know the ball maintains it's momentum wherever I strikes the face. The ball will stay on line and still not lose distance like toe & heel hits on other putters. And that is a confidence builder.
    Because this putter does not torque on impact, the entire face stays square to where your hands are. That doesn't mean you can't push or pull it. As long as your hands are locked in, the face will stay square to the line on miss hits ... heel or toe.
     
    The Numbers
    I was one of the last in the group to receive my putter because of issues delaying my fitting process and also from being away on vacation. So I probably had 2 weeks less with my DF than most of the others. I started playing with it immediately.
    I could have set up a putting trial with chalk lines and gates, but I don’t believe quantifying practice tells me anything about playability under pressure. Putting 25 balls down a chalk line with both putters on a flat putting green, doesn't help me on the course when trying to win skins. Besides, the practice green is the only flat green on our course. And at my age fatigue is an issue, too. My back is so bad it starts aching if I practice putting or chipping for more than 10 min. And that fatigue would have affected bulk testing. I have no problem trying out a club under fire. We play small $5-$20 games 3 times a week, so it was no big deal trying the DF out in a skins game. I was so happy with the club, I used it in a tournament after only playing 3 rounds with it. We tied for first, but lost on a coin toss.
    I felt like I was fairly good at putting with my Spider. So, here are a few comparisons between it and the DF, so you can see my base and where the DF excelled.
    I had 9-hole rounds with 5-1 putts using both putters in our men's association ... all over 10 foot putts I've had 15-putt, 9-hole rounds with both putters I had sub 30-putt, 18-hole rounds in skin games with both putters I achieved a 50% reduction in 3-putts with the DF I feel that my lag putts land closer with the DF  I had been tracking Distance to pin 1st putt / Number of putts / Distance missed, on my score cards, but I gave up and relied on my Arccos Caddie stats instead. So the only stats of mine that I feel are worthy of sharing are from my Arccos data.
    I had lost my original Arccos putter sensor and Arccos replaced it for free … many thanks Arccos. I also purchased a second putter sensor so that I could track both putter’s stats separately.

    Included in these graphics are the last 100 putts with both my Spider EX, and the last 100 putts with the Directed Force 2.1. As you can see there is a slight improvement in 1-putts. But the huge impact for me was the reduction in 3 putts. Every 3 putt eliminated is a stroke saved. 
    I wish I could show y’all a graphic for distance left after the 1st putt. I tracked it manually a few rounds with each putter, but didn’t feel like I saved enough data to make it anything more than anecdotal. Which is unfortunate, because I honestly feel I am leaving my 10’-30’ putts much closer with the DF … less than a foot in a majority of cases. The fact that my 3 putts have been reduced by 50% proves that I am leaving long putts closer.
    It’s difficult to quantify confidence in a putter. I had it with my old putter … I’ve got more of it with the Directed Force 2.1.
     
    On The Course
    “Set It and Forget It” is a trademarked phrase by marketing genius Ron Popeil that took on pop culture status in the 90s. His catch phrase has become my putting mantra for the DF 2.1. I set the club on line and I never think about it again, instead concentrating on distance and pace.
    I have a random putting flaw where I occasionally pull my hands outside my swing plane. Sometimes, as I take the putter back, the head jumps off my swing path ... I’ve got a bit of nerve damage in my hands. But the point is, I see it when it happens, and that blows my concentration ... instead of focusing on pace, I am thinking about mechanics and it’s not going to be a good stroke. With the DF I don’t worry about controlling the stroke path anymore. I have complete confidence that if miss the center of the face, the ball will still travel on my intended line at the pace I wanted. That has given me freedom to focus on touch. Now when I see the putter move, I ignore it and toss the ball to the hole.
    With the margin of error the DF provides me, I can ignore my hand drift when I see it. Sure, I still push an occasional putt. I still roll my hands on occasions, too. I’m not saying the DF eliminates all my problems. I’m saying that for me, it takes my mind off trying to control my swing, too precisely. My Arccos data has shown that using the DF has reduced my 3 putts by 50%, and that's the difference between a 4/3 skin and a 5/4 "also ran".
    I may come off looking like an egotistical ass for this next graphic ... but I believe this putter played a huge part in my performance in a recent tournament. I had a Cinderella round ... I’ve included the scorecard ... and as you can see I played out my ass. This is an anomaly folks. Although I must say it stems from the confidence I had standing over every putt. And I am thoroughly convinced that that confidence carried over into my entire game that day. My drives were longer & straighter and I was confident I was going to chip-in a ball before I hit it. Don’t get me wrong, there was a fair amount of luck involved, especially on several approach shots. And hell, if you look close enough you can see that I got too cocky on the 14th, rushed the putt and lipped out an easy 5’ putt for par/birdie. Plus I had 2-3 putts of which I am thoroughly ashamed.

    Full disclosure: the next round after that tournament was in our Tuesday, senior skins game, and I shot an 85. It consisted of 4-1 putts and 14-2 putts. Two skins and not a 3 putt in the bunch. I'm happy with that.
     
    The Good, The Bad, and In Between
    Good
    This is an anti-torque head with an anti-torque shaft and they work perfectly together. I do not see any degradation in off center putts. 
    I love the soft feel of the BGT - Stability Tour Fire shaft. The LA Golf shaft is listed as having an even a softer feel. The soft feel gives me the impression that my putts are effortless as opposed to throwing my heavy headed Spider at the ball on really long putts. 
    Don’t confuse soft feel with weak ... soft does not equate to loss of feel ... I do not need to swing harder on long putts. When I putt now, my stroke feels far more intuitive ... like throwing darts. This configuration putts as easily on 35’ putts as it does at 10 footers. The ball comes off the face easily and rolls straight as an arrow.
    The alignment lines are fantastic. I love how confident I feel that I am on target.
    I can’t think of a single thing to change on this club. People say it’s ugly. I don’t care because I'm putting great with it.
    The Bad ... Slightly Unhappy
    I was unhappy with the remote fitting process. I screwed it up by submitting a poor fitting video. I would have preferred to try before I buy. That’s my only hang up in this process. I honestly believe that face to face interaction would have been better for me.
    I sincerely feel that if it had been possible for me to try this putter out first, and experiment with different lies, maybe I could have had even better results than I got. Seems petty and doesn't mean I'm right. But there will always be that doubt in my head … could it be better? Would I have liked a blade better? 
    I tried a myriad of putters before selecting the Spider EX I was using. When I ordered it, I asked for a custom bump to the standard lie by 2°, (assuming standard to be 67°). Turns out my Spider is a 70° standard; 72° as ordered. In the fitting video I sent L.A.B., I can see that I have the toe of the putter in the air. Lots of people putt with the toe in the air ... how was L.A.B. to know I didn't too? Nope, I did not pay enough attention to my setup and I regret it. They came back with a measurement off the video of a 67° lie, (which I have verified on my computer). It was my fault that I didn't get the lie I wanted.

    I thought I was matching the putter I liked. I was wrong. So my unhappiness was caused by me. I regret that I did not match the Spider's lie angle, because like I said, it might have increased my success with the DF. And there's no running to a local fitter, if we had one, to have the lie adjusted ... you can't bend a composite shaft.
    So if you order via the remote fitting process, do your homework. Try and determine what you are currently using before submitting your video. Do you want to match your current putter or improve on it? Talk it over with them. They will work with you. One caveat is that it took 2 days to get any of my questions answered. And with a holiday in the mix, a question on Friday didn't get addressed until the following Wednesday. It's only an issue if you are in a time crunch, as I was, needing the putter for my review.
    Lie Angle Hack: Hold your putter flat against a tabletop, and using a protractor app on your phone, measure your lie angle.
    Due to buttons getting in the way, you are probably going to get a measurement within ±1° ... make certain your table top is 0° too.

    One minor caveat about the grip … I have a cart bag, and the extra width of the grip can interfere with other clubs when bagging or un-bagging them.  
    Play it or Trade it
    In My Bag - Forever
    I actually GOOGLED "Will a New Putter Improve My Putting"
    GOOGLE Says:
    A change of putter can never compensate for a lack of skill. At best it can make poor putting slightly less bad. 
    Hey GOOGLE, WRONG!
    When you’ve been playing for a decade or two, you develop bad habits. And bad habits using a putter with no margin for error just makes things worse. A new Directed Force can actually compensate for some bad habits.
    Case in point: I showed my Directed Force to Dan, a fellow golfer in our Saturday Morning Skins Game. He has fought an outside-in putting stroke his entire life, which is kind-of similar to my hands drifting off my intended swing path. For both of us, missing the center of the club with our old putters, means our putts will probably be off line and short. The DF does not penalize you on off-center hits, because the head doesn't torque open and you don't lose momentum at impact ... the entire face stays square to the target line. My off-center hits did not affect my putt distances. When I know my putter is square to my target line ... when I can ignore a swing path error, then I am going to be more successful with my pacing, and that means I’ll make more putts. To me the DF is a game improvement putter and it works.
    Dan has been practicing specifically to control his putting swing plane … to a moderate success. It is a habit he picked up / ingrained at the beginning of his golf career, and those are near impossible to eliminate. From the first time he tried my DF was on the 9th green ... he started rolling them in from +10 feet. He was so excited he didn’t give the putter back to me for 10 minutes. Yes, he was still swinging outside in, but what was different this time, was that the putter was not penalizing him for off center hits. The face stayed square because it did not torque and the putts rolled true because the face maintained momentum along its entirety.
    If you struggle with your putting swing plane, you need to give L.A.B. putters a try. It could make a big difference.
    Trade It - Never
    When I announced to my fellow golfers at the club, that I had been selected to review the Directed Force, some of the guys joked that I could trade it for a new driver after the review. I’ll say it right here and now, I wouldn’t trade it for an entire new set of new clubs.
    To give you a better idea as to the value / price of my Directed Force configuration, consider this: My custom made Spider EX retailed for close to $500, with a standard shaft. The price for a stock Directed Force 2.1 with the fantastic Press-II 3° grip is $399. To customize it with non-standard length or lie, it starts at $549 and that is just slightly more than the Spider EX. Then there are upgraded shaft options from $100 - $380. The DF 2.1 configuration that I tested has the BGT - Stability Tour Fire shaft ($275) and Alignment markings ($25) for a total of $849.00. I believe it is in the same price range as mass market putters, and worth every penny.
     
    Conclusion
    I said it before: “I was not in the market for a new putter.” I was curious though. I wanted to see what a torque-less putter was all about. Drive for show — putt for dough hints at a deeper concept here … confidence in your putter is far more important than confidence in your driver. You can always fall back to your 3 wood, but lack of confidence in your putter can be disastrous.
    First Impressions: 
    I had issues with the remote fitting process ... part of it turned out to be my fault. I believe putters are intuitive weapons, and I want to hold it in my hands before I buy it. That said however, I love this putter. Yes, I initially thought it was big and ugly, but I don't anymore.
    Aesthetics:
    As far as looks go … who cares. I think it must look intimidating to my opponents. Besides, I have won money with it. The grip is fantastic and instills as much confidence as the putter head does. And the shaft not only adds to the non-torque capabilities, it provides a soft, pleasant feel.
    The Numbers:
    My stats show that I’ve reduced 3 putts by as much as 50%, and that’s the difference between a 4/3 skin and a 5/4 no-one-cares. The reduction in 3 putts is proof that I’m leaving my putts closer … I honestly feel like I have more putts stopping within inches then I did with my old putter.
    On-Course: 
    Confidence. Lining a putt up is easy for me with these top lines. Fantastic grip makes me feel like my hands are locked in. Linear face momentum from the non-torque head eliminates my worries for an imperfect stroke. Soft feel off the face gives me the the sense that I’m tossing darts.
    The Good, the Bad, the In-Between:
    For me, this is a game changing putter. The non-torque head and shaft compensate for my occasional drifting off the swing path and off center hits still track true. And yet, even though this is simply a mental hangup for me, I can’t help but wonder whether this is the perfect L.A.B. model for me.
    Someone asked me:
    "Are you happy with it."
         "Absolutely."
    "Then get over it and move on."
         "Yes, but ..." 
    Play it or Trade it:
    The Directed Force 2.1 is in my bag to stay. The guys at the club keep joking about me trading trade it for a new driver(s) … they think it’s ugly. I just laughed while they were handing me my tournament money. Enough said.
    It sounds a little cheesy, but the DF 2.1 lead me to begin thinking “I can do this.” And that powerful thought is a positivity that has seeped into my game overall. I’m enjoying my game more. There's tons of room for improvement, but I'm coming home in a much better mood. My wife is really happy about that.
    I'm showing this putter to everyone, whether they have doubts about their putting stroke or not. While the base model DF is about the same price as discounted big name putters out there, custom versions of the DF are priced in line with big name putter customizations. So the next time you are in a golf store, pick one up and give it a try, then think about remote fitting. It might change your game. 

     
     
    I know, it's only a 6 footer. But anything further and y'all would be accusing me of staging it.
     
     
     
     
  13. Like
    mynerds reacted to DriverBreaker in L.A.B. DF2.1 Putter   
    L.A.B. Directed Force 2.1 Putter – Official MGS Forum Review by GolfSpy_CS
    Full Introduction - click here
    First Impressions (4/5 Stars)
    I don’t think anything can really prepare you for how massive the Directed Force 2.1 head truly is.  I mean there’s mallet putters and then there’s this thing.  I saw a Mezz.1 in person a week before I got the DF2.1 and it was a fine sized putter.  Very traditional fang-style size.  This DF2.1 is a jumbo jet!
     
    I rolled a few putts on the carpet and it sets up and feels good.  I did not notice any issues with the forward ball position setup as I already tend towards forward ball position.  Overall, the first impressions are positive.  If you sole it correctly for the lie angle it’s built for and hold it with light grip pressure, the thing just wants to stay square for you. 

    Aesthetics (3/5 Stars)
    You’ll either love or hate the aesthetics of the DF2.1…  Personally, I love and hate it all at the same time, but am growing to love it more and more.  The all black look I went with is clean.  The matte black finish on the head and LA Golf shaft are just what I want them to be.  No glare and mean looking.  I also really like the long white line I chose for the alignment marker. 

    The size of the DF2.1, as mentioned earlier, could be a huge turnoff to some people.  I was just putting with it on TrackMan’s putting analysis and our rep told me that larger mallets sometimes interfere with the TrackMan camera accurately picking up the ball on putts! LOL.  He said, “Yeah this one might be an issue…” 
    The more I’ve putted with it, the more I view the massiveness as a positive though.  It just inspires confidence.  I know I miss toe side with putters, but with this thing, it doesn’t really matter.
    The Numbers (5/5 stars)
    Usually I'm all about data.  I taught a graduate statistics course at my last university for crying out loud.  But I wanted to keep this review on my experience.  My stroke is not your stroke.  My woes are not your woes.  At the end of the day, you've got to like the way your club/putter looks, trust that it will perform, and what works for someone else doesn't mean it will work for you.  If it gives you more confidence, that’s a good thing right?  Here’s what I can say.  In my experience, I’ve never putted better.  My playing partners have noticed as well.  I know that if I pick the right line and speed, I’ve got nothing else to think about or focus on.  With other my other putters (of which there are many), I would miss putts low side and wonder if I pulled them (often I did).  Now I don’t think about it.  I can evaluate if I over/under read break or speed.
    Totally awesome putting video:
    I have made more putts from inside of 10ft and over 15ft since using the L.A.B. than ever in my golfing career.  My lag putting has improved as well.  I don’t know how else to say it, this thing just drains putts.  There were several putting practice sessions that come to mind.  I wrote about these in the comments section, but one time I literally made 10 putts in a row from 10+ feet.  Then I drained one from 25ft just for good measure.  In other sessions I’m making tour-average percentages from 4-6ft (which never happened before).  L.A.B.’s slogan of “You’re a better putter than you think” rings true for me.  They also say on the DF 2.1 page, “Every putt is now makeable.”  I truly do believe that now.
    As far as the actual stats go, my 3 putts are down, my make rate from inside of 10ft is up, and my confidence (while unquantifiable) is also way up.   This thing is staying in the bag.  Here is a quick screenshot of the consistency of this putter from my short TrackMan putting session today.  You’ll notice all of these launch directions were inside of 1* (our TrackMan rep said he’s pretty sure most PGA Tour players are inside of 1* either direction consistently).  If you can do that, you'll hit your line over and over.  You'll probably ask why these putts aren't consecutively numbered 1-10 or something.  The TrackMan rep and I were taking turns so I deleted his putts. 

    On-Course (5/5 stars)
    This thing just makes putts.  Again, I don’t know how else to describe it.  I feel very confident over the ball.  Pick the line, speed, and just let it flow.  As I said in the ‘Numbers’ category, my 3 putts are down, my make rate inside of 10ft is up, and more importantly, my 5 footers after a missed green and a short game save chip/pitch shot are up.  These are very valuable to keeping my scores where I want them.   I’ve also made more putts over 25ft during actual rounds of golf than I ever have before.  The ball just seems to be on a string connected to the cup. 
    The Good, the bad, the in-between (5/5 stars)
    One thing I really appreciated during this process was Sam Han, the CEO reaching out to us as testers for a phone call.  We ended up having close to a one hour phone call about the putter, golf, and life.  Sam is very passionate about the company, the products, and the game.  That was icing on the cake for me.
    People also take notice of this putter.  When you take it out to practice or for a round of golf, people are very interested.  Once they see you start rolling in putts, they really get interested!
    Another thing I really like is that this is the first putter that ever sits flat for me naturally. And it should!  It’s built to my lie angle specifically.  All my other putters are always way toe up because of my low hands at address.  
    I didn’t really like the idea of the online fitting at first.  But after talking with the CEO, it makes sense.  Get comfortable, they build you a awesome putter, go make more putts.  Simple. 
    Play it or Trade it (5/5 stars)
    This should come as no surprise, but this thing is staying in the bag for the foreseeable future (check my updated signature).  I honestly don’t think any of my current putters could hold a candle to it.  There is no reason to make putting any harder than it has to be.  L.A.B. gets my vote.

    Conclusion
    TL;DR:  This thing just makes putts.  I have supreme confidence whenever I step on the green.  Before, I dreaded putting practice, putting during a round of golf, and only when I was inside of 1ft did I feel like I knew the putts were going to fall.  Now, I feel like any putt is legitimately makeable.  Inside of 10ft is no longer a weakness for me.  Putting is finally fun! (never thought I’d say that)
    Final Score (27/30 stars)
  14. Like
    mynerds reacted to GolfSpy SAM in L.A.B. DF2.1 Putter   
    INTRODUCTION can be found here: 
    https://forum.mygolfspy.com/tests/40-lab-df21-putter/?do=findComment&comment=8987
    L.A.B. Golf - DF 2.1 Putter – Official MGS Forum Review by Samsonite, Matt Swanson
    FIRST IMPRESSIONS (5 out of 5 Stars)
    Alright, boys and girls, we have lift-off.  
      While it's still OFFICIALLY *way* too early to name her, I managed to get out to my local putting green after the kids got ready for bed to roll a few and see how she felt.
      In short: I'm pretty blown away by what's happening with this putter.  

    (Just relaxing a little before showing me what she's made of)
    I won't bother with the "unboxing" stuff, as it was very basic and has been covered by everyone else, so no need to bore you: it came in a brown box with "Untorque Yourself" on it, it had bubble wrap (though not secured around it as it was with the Mezz that others have posted) in the box, and was secure but not crazy-shrink-wrapped or anything.
    The cover material is HEAVY, and well-padded, and feels extremely well-made.  It 100% feels like it will keep the head safe (and sweaty...nice and velvety-feeling inside) no matter what kind of bag-chatter might happen while in my bag. 

    (note the sticker - I know others have shown it, but it genuinely makes me laugh.  If you can't read it, it effectively says "don't be a dummy, DO NOT TOUCH THE SCREWS")
    I'm pretty much stunned at how beautiful I find the putter - I know it's part Octopus-head and part Mega-mind (look it up - animated movie with Will Ferrell as the voice), but the quality of the build is certainly not like anything I've ever owned before.  It's spectacular.  

    (What's that?  I look like your putter.  Maybe your putter looks like ME!)
    I went with a simple three-dot alignment aid - and I LOVE it. It's simple, clean, and effective - all while not being too "busy" to distract.  In conjunction with the alignment line on the ball, it seems to really work for me. One of the reasons I'm so excited about this putter, is the fact that it sits flush on the ground behind the ball at address - and since it's fit to me specifically, at 65 degrees, it really helps me get into a proper position at address - if I see the heel/toe up off the ground, I need to adjust.  This is something that I've discovered over the last 6 months - I'm not consistent at all, and my stroke definitely suffers for it.  With the DF2.1, while not impossible to mess up, it's certainly harder to get into a bad position.

    (Top down view - clean three-dot set-up.  Note the sticker is still attached to the face here)
    One of my biggest questions was LAB's patented Press Grip (I went with the recommended 3 degree Press II), but I'm pretty stunned at how well this thing just puts my hands in what feels like absolutely the right position.  I'm coming from a pistol grip, but I LOVE how this feels - it's large, but not off-putting, it's easy to grip lightly while still feeling secure; it's got a tacky feel to it that is weirdly delightful, and even though I know the shaft is leaning and this is putting the putter in a "press", nothing about it feels awkward or leaning - it just feels like my hands are in the right spot. 
    As for how it rolls?  It's still early - tonight was literally the first time I've gotten to actually roll any, but LAB isn't making things up when they say this thing nearly swings itself.  The head is SO stable, it really feels like it's on rails - you get it back in place, and just kind of ... let it go.  It's almost like a pinball lever - you pull it back, and it can ONLY go forward - you just determine the speed.  
    Now, as I said, it's still early.  I found some great early success, especially in my "problem area" of 5-15 feet - drained a LOT more than I normally do, and left the ones I missed comfortably within 18".  
    Getting comfortable with pace will be the next step, as it's not "pull back the same amount and accelerate through at different speeds" like I'd been doing previously for different-length putts.  This, and a lot of this is coming directly from LAB and Sam Hahn's (CEO of LAB) various web appearances (I've been watching everything I can find in prep for getting this thing in-hand), is basically "let gravity do its thing" - so shorter backswing for shorter putts, longer for longer, etc.  Determining where on the 'clock' my hands need to go to for 10', 20', 30', etc, will take some trial and (probably lots of) error.
    But I'm in.  I can see this being just an absolute get-out-of-jail, go-directly-to-Samsonite's-bag card, and I can't remember ever feeling like that after one practice session with any club before.  
    Now, because I've read up on this, I understand this is most likely the Honeymoon phase, but I'm happy to work through the growing pains so I can see what this thing can really do for my game.  
    That's it for now.  I'll keep updating as I get more acquainted with it, and if any particular pain-points arise, I'll add them as well. 
    But overall, at first blush, this thing is bit of a modern marvel. As you can clearly see - i'm a fan. 
     
    AESTHETICS (5 out of 5 Stars)
    I definitely had a lot of preconceived notions of how I thought it would look based on the reactions I’d seen online from other people, from videos about it from YouTubers, etc.  
    But honestly, pulling it out of the box, seeing the craftsmanship (superb), and now having used it for 5 weeks – I genuinely find it to be beautiful.  It’s a tool that’s built to do one thing – help you make more putts.  Is it conventional-looking?  Of course not – but they’re purposefully trying to defy convention, so if you expect “the same old”, you might not love it.  
    I went with the three-dot alignment aid, which for me is just enough to help find my line (in conjunction with the line on the ball that I use to aim), but not enough to make my eye wander too far away (which is a thing I’ve had happen with “busier” designs).  The black Accra shaft blends seamlessly, and with its matte finish, there’s once again nothing to be distracted by. 

    (Look at that bad-boy grip)
    The biggest surprise for me has been the Press Grip (3 degree, as recommended by the website and fitter) – I’ve never putted with a large grip, and this one just feels…right. My hands naturally seem to find comfort every time, thumbs aligned down the center (and I know they’re centered thanks to the bisecting black/white line down the front), and there’s no real tendency to over-grip – the large size allows me to lightly grip but still feel in control.  I’m a big fan.  
    When I had first been chosen for this testing opportunity, one of my biggest concerns was the "built-in forward press", as I have never been one who presses forward before starting my stroke.  I was also a staunch "ball should be in the middle of your stance" guy (you know, like...umm...those guys who say that kind of thing. I might be making this up.).  So having the forward press built in, as well as the suggestion to play the ball toward the front of my stance seemed crazy to me - and 5 weeks later it's the most natural thing in the world.  So for those of you worried about this aspect, I can firmly attest that if you're willing to take the risk, the rewards are worth it. 
    Also a surprise: how few people have stopped to ask about the putter.  To me, it is wholly unique-looking, and I had planned on including these as interview-style inserts, but outside of a few “what’s that?” or “Is that one of them LAB putters?” over the 5 weeks, it’s mostly been unnoticed.  I did, however, make sure to ask any/all of my playing partners (whether friends or strangers) what they thought of the looks, and despite every one saying it was “biiiig” (and it is), not a one was put off by the size/looks.
    One thing I wanted to note, was just how balanced the club feels.  I don’t actually think it’s “light”, per se, but as soon as it’s in position behind the ball, it swings nearly by itself.  This could be, in all honesty, because my current mallet is considerably heavier than the aluminum head of the LAB – in a fitting I had many months ago, the fitter remarked that my putter head was definitely on the heavy side, and that I could use a lighter head given my set-up/stroke – but I find the balance of the club to be perfect.
    I touched on this in my Initial Impression, and it still holds true, that mis-hits out of the toe have a distinctly aluminum sound – very similar to a baseball bat.  As I like knowing if I got it “solid”, this is not a bad feature to me in the least, as it’s a clear, audible sound that I got it out of the toe – and considering that there has yet to be any real penalty (either line or pace) for hitting it out of the toe, that’s definitely not a bad thing in my book.
    As for hitting it clean out of the middle, I have found the sound to be fairly muted and the feel to be pretty exceptional – a very satisfying “thud” to it, letting you know you got it dead-center.  It’s not as “buttery” as, say, a Ping Insert (Ping Tyne 4 is still the softest putter I’ve ever hit), but certainly not as “clicky” as my prior gamer (which was milled) – though to be fair to that putter, I might have been hitting a lot of “toes” ☺ 
     
    (Toe, Heel and Center Strikes)
    THE NUMBERS (5 out of 5 Stars)
    Accuracy - The simplest way to address this component is to say that hit the intended line every time.  Whether the line is RIGHT or not is a different story.  Quick example: my last round played, I just could NOT see that the greens were not moving nearly as much as my brain told me they were.  I would see the slope, line up my ball to my spot 6" out to the right, pull it back and let it go - and the ball would tumble end-over-end...and miss three inches high. With my previous putter, I never knew if I had a) mis-read the putt, b) mis-hit the putt, or c) hit it too hard/soft.  A and C are still in the mix, of course, but B has been effectively eliminated.  This thing rolls it where you intend it to go.
    Distance Control - With three genuinely dreadful exceptions - all on putts over 75 feet (clearly my approach game hasn't been KILLING it, ahem, but I digress), I’m genuinely shocked with how consistent my distance control has been with this putter.  Yes, I’ve been putting (pronounced "puh-ting", not "putt-ing") in a LOT of practice with it, but as attested to by my regular playing partners, as well as my average 2nd putt distance (well inside 3’, with most inside 2’), I’ve never ever putted with such consistent speed.

    (7 gimmes, two in the cup, from about 12 feet)
    Stability of Stroke - Here’s where the LAB really does exactly what the company claims – I genuinely feel like I would have to work REALLY hard to get the face off my desired line.  It’s almost uncanny – pick a line, line the ball up, line the putter behind the ball, and watch the ball roll end-over-end on the desired line.  I’m a true believer in this technology. 
    Forgiveness - One of the reasons I chose the DF2.1 vs. the Mezz/B2 are the claims about the forgiveness.  There’s a video where the CEO demonstrates hitting the ball out of the center, the toe and the heel, and all three putts roll effectively the same distance, on the same line.  It felt like a magic trick of editing.  But here’s the thing:  it isn’t.  Hit the ball out of the toe, the ball goes where you had it lined up.  Hit the ball out of the heel?  Same thing.  Hit it dead center – ditto.  For my game, this has been an incredible find, as building consistency is a huge part of what I’m attempting to do to get better, and knowing that my distance/line will be effectively the same no matter where on the face I hit it has really allowed me to focus on my stroke and not attempting to manipulate anything DURING the stroke. 
    Playability - One of the last rounds I played I specifically used the putter from off the green as much as I could to get a sense of its usability.  Honestly, this has never been a strength of mine, but knowing that I was going to hit the line I was intending actually made my stroke considerably more confident.  I won’t say it made me BETTER in any measurable way (didn’t hole any, but left myself with inside-3-feet putts 2 times and one other time with about 5’ left), since I don’t really have any stats from my previous putter when playing shots like that, unfortunately, but I can say it made me more confident IN the shot, if that helps at all.  
    ON-COURSE (5 out of 5 stars)
    In the 13 previous rounds this year I’ve played, I averaged 35.15 putts (high of 39, low of 32).  I’ve now played 5 eighteens with the LAB in play, and I’ve averaged 33.2 putts (two 32s, two 33s and a 36 (this round included TWO putts over 80 feet, both of which I 3-putted (left them so short it was nearly comical)).  I can legitimately say that in my second-to-last round, that number could have very easily been in the 20s, considering that I left 4 putts a TOTAL of 20 inches short (that’s what I get for practicing on fast greens and playing on slow…).  I have zero doubt that I will absolutely card my first round with sub-30 putts very soon, and I’ll be sure to comment on this review when that happens.  Getting the speed down on the practice greens is an absolute must for me, as most of my practice with this putter has been at a significantly faster green complex than most of my local munis.  I don't blame the putter for being short in any way, is ultimately what I'm saying.
    One of the things that I wanted to test when I first got the putter was whether or not my consistency with set-up was improved with the LAB.  Because the putter is built to my specs (65 degree lie-angle, 35.25” length), all I have to do is set the putter down behind the ball, on my line, and then step up to the putter.  This was ALWAYS a weakness in my game previously, because I could never tell if the putter was actually flush to the ground (there was a subtle curve on the bottom of the putter head) – so sometimes the toe was up, others the heel up, etc., but I couldn't REALLY tell by looking down at the club.  Now, I know I’m set up over the ball correctly almost without thinking, which – again – allows me to focus solely on the stroke.  It’s freeing in a way that is genuinely exciting (nerdy, I know).
    Since I don’t play in “money matches” yet (I have a lot of poor actor-friends), the only thing I can really say is that I’ve never, ever, felt more confident over a putt.  I don’t ALWAYS think I’m going to make it, but I actually see the road where that’s a reality – no matter the distance, I have a chance.  With every putter I’ve ever used in the past, the goal was to knock it relatively close.  With the DF 2.1, I’m starting to look at long putts (for me, anything over 10’) as legit opportunities.  I knocked in two fifteen-footers my last time out, and just missed another 2 from similar lengths.  I know putting is often a confidence game – and nothing’s ever made me feel more like I have a real shot than this putter.
    When I spoke with the CEO during a practice session, I kind of laughed and said “I’ve never tried a product that did every single thing the manufacturer said it would,” and I meant it. I still do.  Do I think this product will work for EVERY. SINGLE. PERSON?  No. Of course not.  And as attested by a few of the testers in this very test, you can see that it's promise may not be realized by everyone.  But for me, this is perfect.  For the first time, I know I’m going to hit my line BEFORE I strike the ball, not just hoping I hit it.  For the first time, I’m not trying to lag 15-footers, I’m actually trying to make them.  For the first time, putting practice is actually fun.  
    The crazy part of this to me, is the knowledge (well, belief, but I have faith) that the more I practice, the more comfortable I get with this new putter, the more confident I’m going to become.  
    Is confidence over the ball worth the price-tag of $680 that this putter would retail for?  
    For me, it’s a resounding, unquestionable YES.
    THE GOOD, THE BAD, THE IN-BETWEEN (4 out of 5 stars)
    The good:  See above for all the things I found while working with this putter. 
    The bad: LAB desperately needs to hire more people in their customer service department.  I’ve said this from the beginning of the process, but it appears that two people handled all twelve fittings, including all back-and-forth emails.  While I’m assuming there are more than just these two fitters working for the company, having a group of well-qualified service-representatives who could answer questions, return phone calls, etc. would free up the actual fitters to focus solely on the fittings. 

    (Methinks they need some more operators standing by)
    I’m cognizant of the fact that LAB may have decided to have all of our fittings be done by these two fitters, to ensure that we all had similar experiences, but even then – we didn’t (you can see the other reviews for their individual experiences – some great, some not-so-great).  With no ability to test this putter in a store nearby, it’s a supreme act of faith to put down $450+ on a putter that was fitted via a 5-second clip and with minimal follow-up.  While my particular fitting went great and easily, and I’m happy to report that the putter fits me to a tee (Woof - this analogy's a bit on the nose, no?), waiting 24-48 hours for a response to an email/phone call, and not being able to get a hold of someone when you do need to talk to someone is frustrating at best.  I do genuinely understand that LAB may be inundated with fitting requests (especially considering they’re free to anyone who submits a video), which is why I think a dedicated team of customer-service reps whose only job is answering emails (maybe working in conjunction with the fitter, i.e., “I spoke with Jake and he asked me to let you know that the Accra shaft is highly rated and was designed specifically for LAB putters, etc.”) and phone calls would go a HUGE distance in making the prospect of this kind of purchase much easier to swallow. 
    I know that actually speaking with my fitter was a HUGE relief that we got everything right (we spoke about my lie angle (it seemed pretty flat to me, but…only compared to the 70 degrees that my off-the-shelf putter was set at), my shaft selection (I was leaning Accra, which is what he said he played in his Mezz, but that the standard steel shaft was also a great shaft), grip, etc.  Having an actual conversation with someone, even though I wasn’t actually paying for the putter, really calmed my nerves (I didn’t want to waste anyone’s money/time by accidentally getting something that wasn’t right for me), and really made me EXCITED about the putter being built just for me.  
    For this, I’m docking a point, but I can also see this being remedied quickly and relatively easily as the company continues to grow.
    PLAY IT OR TRADE IT? (5 out of 5 stars)
    I genuinely cannot imagine taking this thing out of my bag at this point.  I’ve never felt like I was a confident putter.  I’ve never felt like I could call myself a “decent” putter.  I’ve never felt like putting might be a strength of my game.  But I do now.  My friends starting calling it "Matt's Cheat Stick", and ... it kind of feels like that's super appropriate. 
    CONCLUSION
    If you struggle with consistent set-up, this putter could be for you.  If you struggle with knowing if you’ve hit your line, this putter could be for you.  If you need a putter with high forgiveness on mis-hits, this putter could be for you.  
    It’s definitely the putter for me, for all those reasons and more.
    FINAL SCORE (29 out of 30 stars)
     
    Just a final note here saying how genuinely thrilled I am at having to have been a part of this process.  Thanks to My Golf Spy, all the moderators, Sam Hahn and everyone at L.A.B. Golf.  This was a huge honor and incredible pleasure.
  15. Like
    mynerds reacted to revkev in L.A.B. MEZZ.1 Putter   
    RevKev Intro:
    https://forum.mygolfspy.com/tests/41-lab-mezz1-putter/?do=findComment&comment=9089
    L.A.B.  Mezz.1 putter review
    First Impressions 
    While many OEMs are starting to offer some sort of online fitting component none are as confident about their methods as L.A.B. golf.  There’s a drop down on the home page of the website for fitting and a neat instructional video on how to make a short, 10 second video, of a putting stroke plus a couple of measurements that would be needed to complete a remote fitting. The process, viewing the instructional video, making the fitting video, taking the measurements and sending it all in, took about 5 minutes.  The promised response of “within 48 hours” was easily met.  
    I have been fit for putter before, live, and I will say that my fitter arrived at very similar specs through virtual fitting to the live one that cost me $150.  Very impressive!  
    I ended up with a Mezz.1 putter, 70 degree lie angle, 32.5”, black Accra graphite (low torque) shaft, press II 1.5” grip.  I opted for a dot on the top of the head as my alignment aid, other choices included a line or no alignment aid what so ever.

    The wait for delivery was excruciating but also within the promised time frame. I must say that when I opened the box and first saw my putter I was stunned.  I have been gaming an EVNRoll ER 5 which is a beautiful club. I was only familiar with the Direct Force putter from the L.A.B. line which quite frankly is pretty ugly to my eye.  

    What stunned me about the Mezz.1 was how compact and how beautiful it looked.  Honestly, I think it looks like it belongs in a museum of modern art.  It’s the most beautiful golf club that I have ever seen.  The guys that I play with can’t keep their hands off the thing.  One of the pros at my club hit one putt with it and said, “This thing putts all by itself. It’s gorgeous.” 
    So now it’s time to test Lie Angle Balance out and see if it does what L.A.B. golf claims.  
    Aesthetics 5 for 5



     
    To me the putter looks like a small brick with a piece taken out.  At first, I was taken aback by the inability to scoop the ball up but then I quickly realized that this is because that “feature” makes it more difficult to square the putter at impact.  It’s a putter, not a ball picker. If ever I get to the point that I can’t bend over to pick up my ball, I can have some sort of implement that picks it up. That’s not what the putter is for, it’s there to roll the ball into the hole.
    There are tons of screws on the sole of the Mezz.1, none are noticeable when addressing the ball or really ever unless you want to look at its sole.  (Picture) When you unbox the club there is a disclaimer that tells you not to mess with any of these.  The club is already balanced, any sort of adjustment might and probably will mess with that. 

    I’m not a huge feel guy in that I don’t need my equipment to feel or sound a certain way.  If it performs, I will get used to it.  But this putter feels solid.  Even off centered hits feel solid to the point that it is difficult to say that this one or that one was off center.  If it were an iron or driver, that would be an issue, but with a putter?  So long as the ball rolls the same, who cares.  And the ball does roll the same, seemingly across the face.
    Solid, the Mezz.1 feels and sounds solid to me.  I love holing putts with it because they feel like: holed putts from days of yore, when I was young.
    The Numbers 4 of 5

    Just prior to delivery we received another unexpected gift, a phone call from L.A.B. golf founder and CEO, Sam Hahn.  Accordingly, this is the point where it is appropriate to thank both he and the MGS crew for entrusting us with this test.  
    I know that it is fashionable to bash OEMs and to believe that their claims are nothing more than marketing scams.  However, in the golf industry, at least, my experience has been that most if not all OEMs care about the quality of the product that they produce and also how that product helps golfers enjoy the game.  
    L.A.B. golf is about revolutionizing the art of putting by making it easier and more effective.  Think science of putting instead.  According to their story: “At some point in their life, every golfer has thought, “I suck at putting.” For many golfers, it’s a permanent feeling. And it’s just not true. Every day we show golfers that they’re better putters than they think. They just need better science on their side. And that’s what L.A.B. Golf is bringing to the golf world.”
    In our initial conversation Sam asked me to call when I was ready to hit the practice green for the first time.  I literally called him on my way to my club.  He suggested some drills to try and off I went.  Full disclosure I’m a visual learner.  I understood what he meant by one handed putting but not thumbs off.  Fortunately, when I got home, I found a video of the drills which helped.

     


    The first thing that I noticed on the practice green was that the ball goes where you aim it with this putter and that I had issues with my aim.  No doubt this was because I was doing things with my putting stroke to mitigate against issues I was having with my putting.  I’m a reasonably good player, mid single digit handicap.  At 65 my hands are not nearly as steady as they used to be.  Over the past couple of years, I’ve become susceptible to flipping the club face while putting making it difficult to control my speed.  At my level a stroke here or there turns a 4 handicap into a 6 in no time.
    At first every single putt that I hit went right.  While frustrating it was actually a good sign because it meant that I wasn’t flipping the club.  The low torque and lie angle balance kept the club face square throughout the stroke and that took some getting used to.  Some one-handed putts and having one of the pros check my alignment got me going.  In fact, I did so well one handed, knocking in 5 10 footers in a row, that I thought about adopting that method permanently.  
    It's long been my contention that amateurs miss more putts because they are miss hit than for any other factor.  I don’t have the data to prove that, but I do know from experience that mishits usually come up short and are far more subject to being knocked off line by imperfections in the green. The Mezz.1 all put eliminates that possibility.  It is extremely forgiving.  In fact, I see as I’m completing this review that L.A.B. golf has released a Mezz.1 max which they are billing as being more forgiving.  I can’t imagine why as the Mezz.1 is forgiving enough.
    On-Course (4 of 5)

    Testing a putter on the course is extremely difficult.  IMO general data like that from Shotscope or ARCOSS is unreliable.  Most of the rounds that recreational golfers play include givemees.  A click of the watch is far easier than facing a tricky 4 footer for par.  
    On the course the Mezz.1 performed well.  I certainly had better distance control, especially as the time of my test wore on.  I holed any number of putts from 15-3 feet with some money on the line, more than enough to keep me happy.  
    The only area of concern remains from off the green.  I’ve yet to find the right technique to use it from there.  I play in Florida and chipping into the grain can be tricky.  For now, I’ve switched to my hybrid from off the green but will continue to work the putter to see if I can’t refine that stroke.

    In regards to getting some tangible data for this review I resorted to a MGS most wanted type of test.  I hit 100’s of putts from 3,10 and 30 feet, measuring the results.  For normal expectations I used data from the Tom Fielding Golf School for a scratch golfer.
    From 3 feet I made 96 out of 100 putts or 96 %.  That’s better than the 94 % listed for a scratch golfer.  I was very pleased at this performance but do keep in mind that these were flat putts on two very good putting greens.
    From 10 feet I made 32 out of 100 and more importantly did not leave a single putt outside of 2 feet.  Perhaps most exciting for me was the fact that most of my misses were long. This supports my earlier statement that the Mezz.1 is extremely forgiving.  
    From 30 feet I was far more concerned about dispersion and proximity to the hole than makes.  I only made 4 of the 100 putts that I hit from that distance, but I also only had 8 of 100 putts that finished outside of the proverbial 3 foot circle.  In for real play, I would have holed most of those 8 as several where only just outside that 96 percent circle.  Only 2 were outside my 50/50 distance of 7 feet.  

              
     
    My tendency has always been to leave lag putts short.  With the Mezz.1 I’ve been getting close to 60 percent of my lag putts past the hole!
    The Good, the bad, the inbetween (4/5)
    This one is simple, I love the putter’s look, love its feel, solid, remember, and love its sound.  Thus far I like its performance for all areas with the exception of from off the green.  I suspect that my former putter had a bit more loft which helped from off the green.  

    Play it or Trade it? (5/5)

    As you can see by the picture above the Mezz.1 is in my bag to stay.  For me that’s no small thing as my last 2 putters were in my bag for 10 years and 5 years respectively.  I do not change putters lightly.  
    The Mezz.1 eliminates some of the issues that I’ve had over the past, miss hits and flipping the toe end of the putter over.  It’s put putting back in my hands, eyes and mind’s eye.
    Conclusion
    Going back to the beginning, I handed my Mezz.1 to one of the teaching pros at my club.  He took one stroke with it and said, “that thing putts all by itself.”  Then he asked, “What’s its price point?” I think that the way I have it set up my putter would retail for $549.  He said, “For a putter?  No way!”  But after some conversation it was because of the way he thinks about putters and putting.  For him and for many golfers from the top of the game down, putters are expendable, have a bunch in the closet and go with the “hot” hand.
    L.A.B. golf is trying to change that way of thought.  At price points from $350 to $750 their putters are like drivers, my Stealth for example, retails for $549.  If you are properly fit and have a putter that works for rather than against, there is no reason why it shouldn’t stay in the bag for 5 plus years.  Looking at it that way, while recognizing that you will use it 30-40 times each round, a putter like this one is well worth the cost for anyone who is serious about playing his or her best golf.


    The look is beyond cool, so cool that I can’t keep it out of other people’s hands once they see it.  The feel is solid, you strike a putt on your intended line, and it seems as if it must go in.  The numbers that I assembled were impressive.  A very high percentage of short putts holed a nice percentage of 10 footers with no troubling attempts out of 100 and a tremendous dispersion pattern from 30 feet.  
    As I’m writing I’m anxious to get out to the course again, stroke a putt, have that solid feel and hear the sound of the ball dropping to the bottom of the cup.
     
    Final Score 27/30 stars

     



  16. Like
    mynerds reacted to Dragon3 in L.A.B. MEZZ.1 Putter   
    L.A.B. Putter Mezz.1 - Official MGS Forum Review by @Dragon3 Intro:    
     
    Grading 
    First Impressions (5/5) 
    It’s all in the presentation or in this case the delivery. And first impressions can definitely set the tone and in some cases be a deal breaker. My putter was treated like a fine piece of China with all the bubble wrap and specified name on the plastic bag. Definitely don’t want anything to come damaged until it reaches its final destination. #untorqueyourself is their patent and truly the basis of simplifying the process. We’ll see if L.A.B. (lie angle balance) does what’s intended. Time will definitely tell...
     


     
    The photo taken with my current Odyssey was taken for comparison purposes, as they're both 32” in length.
     

     
    While the press II 1.5°Grip came recommended it is a bit more than I expected. I’m still adjusting to the grip’s firmness and bulkiness in size.
     

     
     
    Another view
     

     
    Aesthetics (3/5)
     
    Looks 
    The L.A.B. Golf MEZZ.1 is touted as one of the most aesthetically pleasing to date. Admittedly, it takes some getting used to. I suppose it resembles most putters, as far as mid-mallet shapes – a sleek, small, black, fang-style putter. I appreciate technology and maybe I’m more old school. 
    The MEZZ.1 is center-shafted with a black ACCRA X L.A.B. golf shaft. 
    The L.A.B. Golf logo on the back of the mallet resembles a clove in cards 
    Flipping over the putter it features eight weights on the bottom with another two on the sides of the clubhead. 

     
    I selected a line marking. L.A.B. allows for customization of this putter with a dot or nothing. There are also further customization options with different grips. 

    It should be noted, as this review was being finalized and going to “press” so to speak, the putter has since been upgraded to include some new colors. My rating is however based on what was currently available at the time. My possible rating may have been a 4. 
    Sound & Feel 
    That combination of materials equates to a fantastic feel, noticeably. It is a delicate combination of softness with a satisfying jolt off the face. However, the feeling wasn’t as soft for me. 
    If you’re unprepared, the ball just tends to roll right off the face. So, definitely take that under consideration. There is this faint sound encountered at alignment. I barely noticed any sound therefore, I can only assume that the alignment functioned, as intended. 
    Grip Selection: 
    Another part of the feel of the club is in the choice of grip that is placed on it. The grip that came recommended for the Mezz.1, was the Press II 1.5. The grip was described as smaller than other L.A.B. putter grip models, is a bit tapered, and features a flat top. The grip was actually bulkier and still requires some acclimation to gain that expected comfort level to gain consistent putting strokes. While simple by design, the logo and lettering appeared too large in scope and generally subtleness, less overt in nature for my personalized taste.
    Overall softness is neutral and sound negligible. 
    The Numbers (4/5) 
    Accuracy 
    I was able to gain a consistent repeatable stroke performance with repeatable steps within my living area, putting mat set up, outdoor area, before feeling comfortable to hit practice putting areas at the course. As anything, patience is required. 
    Distance Control
    Obtaining distance control was based on length of putting strokes and slopes of hills. Initially posed some challenges prior to some control. Maybe due to overcompensating and/or just overall familiarity. 
    Stability of Stroke 
    Alignment and consistency of strokes was obtained upon many routine practicing shots. It stayed square throughout the stroke, as noted on their site. Very little required. It stayed square as mentioned on their site.
    Forgiveness 
    For stability, ”the midsection of the putter is fully CNC machined from 303 stainless” that improves feel. The body of the MEZZ.1 is fully CNC milled from a billet of 6061 aircraft aluminum to improve forgiveness.” 
    Playability 
    Comfort was the word that L.A.B. emphasizes in all facets. So to master this area, you really have to feel it so to speak in order to achieve it. In some instances but not in every. 
    On-Course (4/5) 
    Performance 
    L.A.B. Golf has always had one central idea for their putters, and that’s the idea of lie angle balance (that’s where the name L.A.B. comes from). “Lie angle balance” defined by the company is the putter’s ability to stay square to the path during the putting stroke without any adjustment from your hands. This goes beyond what many of us know as the standard face-balanced style of putters. This putter, like the other L.A.B. Golf models remove torque, or the putter head’s tendency to twist, from the equation. That leads to a more consistent, repeatable stroke. 
    For testing, I used executive courses for my practicing area. I used different putting holes and varying lengths. Speed and distance control came after familiarizing with the set up. And I always tended to putt on my intended line. 
    I was able to make the putts with the MEZZ.1 both from long range or short distances. It resulted in true distance control and translated into successful putts on the greens. 
    On a downhill, the ball appeared to roll right off the face. So, definitely take that under consideration. There is this faint sound. If you see that metal part on top, I think a lot of the sound is coming from there. But here is what I found a bit strange, and I need to work on this a lot...The sound seems more pronounced the more off-center you hit it. And when aligned, it seems like a faint sound. 
    The Good, the bad, the in between (4/5) 
    Notably, the online fitting process was seamless and pretty simple.. And the Order was placed rather promptly. Shipping was easy to track once received via UPS. Packed well.
     
    I submitted a video based on guidelines provided. Upon submission, I received a automatic generated email that I should hear back within 24-48 hours. I did hear back within a day in which I liaised with my assigned consumer sales rep. I did have to submit another video for accuracy of capture. And then upon, I was given suggestions to hone in on appropriate specs. My specs were shaft length 32” and 69°. The length selected was the same as my current one and based on comfort. All my inquiries were addressed. Based upon the responses, I was able to make my choice. If I had specific particulars, I probably could have had more customization. Being a bit unfamiliar, I went in with no prior expectations. Each rep has his own personality. Philip was very accommodating and supportive throughout the process. 
    Upon receipt of my putter, I received a call from the CEO, as an introduction which was unexpected. Personable touches are definitely noteworthy and go a long way for the future. 
    Play it or Trade it? (3/5) 
    Please note, I was not in the market for a new putter per se.  And must admit putting is not my biggest problem area.  I’ll still probably play it, unless I find something more aesthetically appealing.  And yet I still navigate to my Odyssey WH #5. If I allow for more time, it may grow on me. 
    Align, consistency, repeatable will factor heavily in my decision to still play it. 
    Conclusion 
    I witnessed some minor improvements during the round. The Mezz.1 can require some patience and practice to get the most out of it, even though putting isn’t my biggest problem area. If you’re willing to give it the time and attention it needs to help your putting improve, you are surely going to see more putts fall. There’s a consistent feel and roll that can be obtained, resulting in accuracy on the greens. 
    Putting made easy is their mantra. 
    This putter makes the case that it “works for you, not against you.” By locating the shaft bore in a specific proximity to the putter’s center of gravity, it removes the way a golfer has to manipulate the head to square the face. Ten weights (eight on the bottom, two on the sides) allow the company to perfectly match a player’s weight, setup and lie angle specifications. And though personally, I’m not in love with the look, the putterhead is fully CNC machined from aircraft aluminum and stainless steel for a familiar, almost traditional, sound and feel. 
    Check out this quick video: MEZZ.1 Putter - L.A.B Gol
    Final Score (23/30 stars)
     
  17. Like
    mynerds reacted to bens197 in L.A.B. MEZZ.1 Putter   
    TL;DR, full introduction here…
     
    First Impressions 5/5
    From the beginning, this test was different than others I’ve participated in.  We were told to avoid contacting the company directly or else you’re subject to disqualification.  L.A.B. had requested the contrary, so imagine my surprise when I was on the 17th hole of my home course after missing a 6 footer for birdie and I had an unknown caller from Oregon.  It was Sam Hahn.  Hi Steve, this is Sam…we had several more exchanges since then and there was nothing off limits for discussion as long as we were discussing the putters.
    So how did I choose the MEZZ.1?  I thought all heads were pretty interesting and quite honestly, I would have been happy with any if we were voluntold which ones to select.  I liked the MEZZ.1 simply because I wanted a mallet that was not too large.
    What I’ve learned during this process is that it requires an open mind.  The technology we see on the social media ads are designed to break our preconceived notions about putting.  How many of us miss putts because we miss the center of the face?  Count me in on that group, especially on longer putts.  Ever hit one off of the heel and say GD?  I do…well, I did.
    Now I can…the focused mass simply makes misses better.  This technology has been attempted previously with other manufacturers and the side effects were dead faces.  Miss the toe or heel, sure, but you better smash it.  Not with L.A.B….You can miss them with your normal stroke without hammering putts and you reach your intended target.
    So continuing with looks…
    Aesthetics 5/5
     
    I do not care much for hard and square lines on a putter; my preferences are a softer and subdued style so this is certainly in stark contrast to what I’ve always preferred.  Here’s the thing, there’s no growth in your comfort zone so get out and try something different.  I was apprehensive about signing up for this test based solely upon looks…I decided that I could continue to operate under the same level of comfort OR I could try something new and innovative and see if it could help me improve.  I am glad I did.
     
    My first impression video offered looks and sound which immediately pleased me.  I would attribute a part of this to the LA Golf shaft as a contributing factor.  As the sum of its parts, this feels solid ALL ACROSS THE FACE.  Misses feel solid and that tells me this technology is legit.  Which putter helps you miss the ball better…Sound is feel and it feels good.
    Bottom line…they made tech look cool
    The Numbers (5 out of 5 stars)
     
    I only had 3, 3-putts during this entire testing period throughout 11 rounds of golf.
    Learning how to play this appropriately so that it would complement my game was the most difficult part of the process.  If this were me hitting putts at a local shop on their carpet, I may have hit a few and said nah, I’m good.  It took time to sort my mind out and understand where this putter begins the upstroke beyond the base of my arc.  I’ve always played my putters off my left toe and purposefully caught the ball in that moment.  With the forward press built into the club, I had to move the ball back and realize that this is the optimal setup position.  It was not easy, especially considering that I did not like the Press Grip.  It was too large for me and after a few rounds despite successful putting, I swapped it out for a Winn pistol.  I respect the sum of all parts and how this product works in spite of its design however, I felt like I could get more out of this club.  After making the switch, I was making more putts within the 5-15’ range.  At the moment I feel unstoppable and get frustrated when I miss from this range.  I feel the head better.  I've had most success when I set the ball up just off the center of the face towards the toe.  It suits my eye, feels wonderful and I try to catch the ball where the center grey part meets the black portion of the toe.
    On-Course (5 out of 5 stars)
     
    I played 11 rounds of golf (18 and 9 hole rounds) and only had 3, 3 putts.  2 of those came during one 9 hole round where I was just lost and had no touch.  While I often feel strong about my putting, this only made me stronger.  I felt phenomenally confident on my 5-15’ putts where I could give them a shot yet still leave them in a makable range.  My scoring average this year prior to testing was in the low 80’s and my index was 6.3 to begin the year.  I was able to get that down to a 5.1 during my 9th round with this putter.  That works for me.
    The Good, the bad, the in-between (5 out of 5 stars)
    “Hey Steve, here’s my cell.  Please call me and text me throughout the process if you have any questions regarding the MEZZ or L.A.B. In general.”  Now I am paraphrasing however this is the essence of what we (I) dealt with and experienced.  Sam gets it.  This is the good stuff, the humility and genuine concern for the golfer’s experience.  Sam Hahn was accessible and sought feedback on our testing.  Not much else to say…we spoke more via text however the two phone calls we had were 14 and 8 minutes respectively.  That’s a lot of time to talk shop without much filler.
     
    Play it or Trade it? (5 out of 5 stars)
    I said from the beginning, if this putter was better than my Cameron, I would sell my Cameron.  I am selling my Cameron.
    A perfect score?  Seriously Steve?…without pause, I say absolutely yes…I am remarkably better with this putter and that’s the entire point.  Accessible CEO, quality product, better results.
    In sum...
    Different is good.  Try something truly different that is engineered to make your misses better; it worked for me.
  18. Like
    mynerds reacted to Bulldog in L.A.B. MEZZ.1 Putter   
    L.A.B. MEZZ.1 Putter – Official MGS Forum Review by Bulldog
     
    Full introduction - click here
     
     
     
    First Impressions  (⭐⭐⭐⭐)
    Usually, getting a new golf club gives me an “ooh, ahh” moment.   When I opened the box, my first impression was, “OK, this is weird.”  Conventional is not a word you’d think of when you see it. The fit and finish of the putter is exceptional.  It oozes quality and craftsmanship. The magnetic latching head cover is almost too nice to use.  Maybe the head cover needs a head cover. Even the packaging was impressive.

     
     

     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    Aesthetics  (⭐⭐⭐)
    It took me some time to get used to the look of the MEZZ. If Lockheed Aircraft designed a barbecue fork, it would look like the MEZZ. Think industrial origami. I’ve grown comfortable with the looks, but I wouldn't call it attractive.

     
     
     
     
     
    The bad boy, black monochrome look works well and there are no distracting sun refections. The shaft logo was installed label down by default which I appreciate.
     

    Putts on the center of the face are muted. After my first few, I though the face might be some kind of plastic. There is no metallic sound at all (sorry Ping). Off-center putts are a bit louder, with a “clunk.”  Hitting it far on the toe or heel will cost you accuracy.
     
    The alignment line is short. It gives you an impact point target. I may experiment with adding some pinstripe tape on the forks (maybe flames).

     
     
     
     
    I was surprised by the feel. Compared to other putters I’ve used, it’s very, very soft. I was startled by the feel the first time I putted with it. 
    It's much lighter than the KS1 (my Kirkland KS1 has the optional weight kit).  Again, a new feeling but not bad.  
    Since I started using the MEZZ  I've switched back to left-hand low grip that I used years ago.  It just feels better.
     
     
     
     
     
    The Numbers  (⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐)
    I examined the putting data from Arccos for seven rounds with the MEZZ and seven previous rounds with the Kirkland KS1. The MEZZ showed 2.4 strokes gained improvement in putting.
    Here are the stroked gained numbers from best to worst, per round based on my handicap:
    MEZZ  +1.7   +1.6   +1.2   +1.0   -0.3   -1.5   -3.1                    
    KS1     +2.1    +0.9   -1.9   -3.2   -2.5   -5.7   -5.8               
    Overall, the number of one and two putts are trending the same, but three putts have decreased by an average of one per round (yippee!) 
     
     

    On the practice green, the MEZZ beat the KS1 putter on 5 and 10 foot putts. Not by a ton, but consistently.
     
    On-Course (⭐⭐⭐⭐)
    This thing has accuracy nailed.  The ball goes where the putter is pointed.  I’ve used it for seven rounds, plus plenty of time on the practice green.  My confidence in my putting accuracy is at the highest it’s every been. Distance control is good.
    At first, I was leaving putts short. I think it was due to the soft feel and quietness.  Fairly quickly, I adjusted my swing and saw improvement.  

     
     
     
    The Press II 1.5° grip is interesting. It's another L.A.B. out of the box idea where the grip gives you an automatic forward press.  I’ve always had a tendency to press the grip forward when putting. This grip does that for me.  
     
     
     
     
     
     
    The MEZZ works well from the fringe, but the sharp leading edge makes it difficult to use from the rough. Not a problem for me. Putting from the rough has never worked for me.
     
    The Good, the bad, the in between (⭐⭐⭐⭐)
    The Good - Accuracy, Accuracy, Accuracy The Bad - Price.  Some of my golf buddies have been speechless when told the price.  The In Between - Looks. The MEZZ.1 design is function over form, physics over aesthetics.
     
    Play it or Trade it? (5 out of 5 stars)
    It stays in the bag. Period.
     
    Conclusion
     

    Putter Balance Video.mp4    
    I’m not sure i’d call it a nonconformist putter, maybe just settle on unconventional.  I wish there were more of that kind of thinking in golf equipment. I was skeptical that the lie angle balance could make a difference in my score.  Overall, my misses are closer, the circle of dispersion is smaller and my putting scores are better. Golf is a bit more fun.
     
    Final Score  - 25 out of 30 Stars
     
     
     
     
     
     

  19. Like
    mynerds reacted to thechrisgibbs in L.A.B. B.2 Putter   
    This has been an absolute whirlwind of a summer for me, and at the center of this golf season has been the LAB B.2 Putter testing. I’ve tested it on practice greens, links courses, woodland courses, private courses, municipal courses, and the famous Punchbowl 36 hole putting course at Bandon Dunes in Oregon, though I’m not using any data points from the Punchbowl as the accuracy deteriorated rapidly coinciding with my above average alcohol intake. I’m very excited to go through the numbers along with the more subjective items. If I were to put a thesis on the testing, I would say the marketing phrase LAB uses, “The club face just wants to return to square,” is absolutely spot on. With no further ado, the review:
     
    First Impressions 5/5 - I’ll start here by explaining what I meant by the club head just wanting to return to square. Whether you have a blade type swing or a mallet type swing, the lie angle balance allows the club face to come back to square throughout your swing. Simply, to quote the great Hermione Grainger, “It’s magic.” I felt like on the Perfect Putter training aid practice session and initial on course practice I couldn’t hit the ball offline from my mark. I use the TP5 Pix ball when putting as I want the instant feedback you get when you start rolling the ball and can see you hit it straight on your line. This helps me understand how my putt reading is doing that day. If I roll it straight and true and I miss high or low, I can immediately take that into my next putt.

    There is something to be said about starting a putt out online, rolling off the face at a perfect launch angle, and finding the bottom of the cup. The feel out of the center of the club face (more on that later) is the perfect blend of soft and hot. Some blades suffer from being soft but dead inside like my high school principal and current putter in the bag just before this test (foreshadowing?), the Cleveland Huntington Beach series blade. Other putters like my old Taylormade TP blade suffer from the opposite problem where they’re too hot with very little feel, similar to my college girlfriend. The B.2 was an unbelievably perfect blend of the two amounting to what I would trademark “Hot with the Feels.”
    Aesthetics 3/5 - Right out of the box, this putter has maybe the most attractive finish of any golf club I’ve ever tested. It oozes a premium vibe in how flat the light bounces off the different angles with an almost raw feel to the finish. For the initial unboxing ceremony alone, I would give the aesthetics 5/5 stars, but things changed over time with the finish. I’ll get back to this in a later section describing some of the downsides of the putter, because much like myself, the more time in the sun and on the course the putter spent, the more haggard he looked.

    That’s sadly where the initial jaw dropping concluded. A few things stand out but none more than the center shafted club head. My caddie at Bandon Dunes saw the club and asked if I had made it at home. This may very well be the future of putting as you’ll see in the Numbers section, but this is a very much divergent look to a standard blade. This is obviously the technology that enables the ‘lie angle balance,’ but other putters achieve the same thing and achieve a look that is a more classical blade. I think Edel does an amazing job with this. Though I can’t speak for those, the design of the B.2 achieves it’s purpose. The look going directly into the center of the putter just takes some getting used to.

    Something else that takes some getting used to is the grip. I have the B.2 with the LAB Golf Press 1.L grip. I used to mimic Jordan Spieth and press my grip forward before stroking my putt, but I realized I wasn’t doing myself any favors as I was not maintaining a proper launch off the putter face. This subtle grip design has the shaft coming out of the grip at a forward angle that is very noticeable. You get used to it, but looking straight down at the putter for the first few times throws you off just a little. Much like my parents small, ugly dog, I love it now, but it’s not going to draw you in just looking at it.

    Numbers 5/5 - On to the only thing that truly matters when using golf clubs. My friend put it best when watching me putt with the B.2 when he said, “Never take that club out of your bag.” I will say, my old Cleveland putter started playing it’s best golf right when it heard I was going to be testing a new club as all old clubs are wont to do. I got graduation goggles the two rounds before this test started. Then, after a week or two of testing, I played my first few rounds with the B.2, and it did not disappoint. Below are just two rounds with the B.2 on my Strokes Gained 18Birdies app:

    The crazy thing about those two rounds is that they were at Bandon Dunes and Pacific Dunes golf course. It’s hard to explain just how different it is putting at a links course, but I shot a 77 and a 78 at those course respectively, and I WORKED the hell out of the putter. Bandon Dunes resort is true links golf and I putt from 20+ yards off the green constantly. I’m not at all a Texas wedge guy, but you have to play that way at a links course like those. When I talked to the CEO, he was concerned my test wouldn’t go well with the B.2 at Bandon because the greens are very complex with multiple types of grass and some extreme undulation. I’d like to express that the putter gave me confidence and feel to the point where I killed it on that trip with my putter making 30+ footers multiple rounds.
    The pièce de rèsistance for the B.2 during testing was my all time low putting round of 26 putts on 18 holes at the course where I play my golf league. Granted, my chipping game was on fire that day, but I didn’t miss a putt from inside 10 feet all day. My handicap is plummeting for better or for worse as the lower the handicap, the less likely I win money week-over-week!
    On-course 5/5 - Not to ‘feed a fed horse,’ (#petaapprovedphrase) but the B.2 truly did not disappoint on the course. I won’t spend much more time here as we’ve really gone deep on my love affair with the putter out on the course. The last piece I’ll dd here with the On-course rating is the same message my dad gave me going into high school: “Confidence is king.” Looking down at my ball, aligned perfectly to my read, and ready to put a swing on it, I’ve never felt more confident that I can launch the ball consistently and on-line.

    The Good, the Bad, and the In-between 3/5 -
    Good: We’ve gone on about a lot of this, but the highlights include the numbers, feel during a centered ball strike, flat plane, look over the ball, and square face during the stroke. Enough said here and above!
    Bad: The club isn’t perfect, by any means. I’d say the biggest concerns don’t impact the club itself, though, and are really just aesthetic. Like I mentioned before, the club gets pretty dinged up VERY easily. There are already a lot of scratches on the finish. I admit, I often times will put the club head cover in the bag at the start of the round, but you really can’t do this with the B.2 if you want it to look like it did day 1. It’s definitely the least durable putter I’ve ever owned.

    In-Between: You have to understand that if you are playing a blade, you are going to lose forgiveness on off-center hits. The same can be said of the B.2, but I do think it has a level of forgiveness better than other blades I’ve played. That said, you gotta hit the center of the club face.
    I’d also like to call out the weight of the club feels light to me. I think there seems to be a dilemma you sometimes get when manufacturers weigh the cost benefit of weight vs. feel. The lighter clubs in my experience have way more feel than the heavier clubs, but vice versa, I’ve had good experience with heavier clubs being easier to lag putt. I think it’s an in-betweener for me here.
    Play It or Trade It? 5/5 - The numbers, my friends, and my handicap as of late don’t lie, this is a ‘play it’ all the way to the bank. I have a hard time seeing myself getting rid of the B.2 at this point. I have been too consistent and had too good of a time with it.

    Conclusion - Well since I’ve been sitting here pontificating about a 3lb piece of metal for 1,000 words, I think I can sum up the putter pretty easily. It’s not the best looking putter in the industry by any means, but the LAB B.2 putter has an incredible blend of “Hot with the Feels.” It’s given me not only more consistency round-by-round, but it’s also given me my best putting round ever with 26 putts. I'd like to thank LAB Golf for being so generous in this test. You've made a promoter out of me, that's for damn sure!
     
    Full Intro Here: https://forum.mygolfspy.com/tests/42-lab-b2-putter/?do=findComment&comment=9006
  20. Like
    mynerds reacted to Lmerrick in L.A.B. B.2 Putter   
    https://forum.mygolfspy.com/tests/42-lab-b2-putter/?do=findComment&comment=8989
     
     

    First Impressions  5.0/5 stars
     
    Let me first say that I had very high hopes for this putter and these to my surprise were exceeded.  The claims of LAB and the technology and design of these putters and the fact that they want to stay square, are spot on.  Nothing I have putted with does what this putter does.  It feels different than anything I have ever stroked a put with.  Not sure it is for everyone (though I don’t know why it wouldn’t be) but it is a very distinct feel, and allows me to feel as if there is no need for any kind of manipulation to maintain square clubface to swing path.  I was very excited to get this blade style version and see how the technology of the LAB spaceship version would be applied to the more traditional and much smaller version.  I am going to try to not sound as if I am spouting hyperbole about this putter but I fell in love with this putter from the minute I picked it up and drew it back.  As a person who is drawn to the look of the Anser style putter, this has a different look.  Some of my buddies said it looks like a hotdog on a stick or a block of steel on a stick ,and while these descriptions are not inaccurate, I found myself growing very fond of the look regardless.  I was not sure how I would like the center shafted look or how I would adjust to the Press 1.5 grip, but it felt extremely comfortable from the first time I picked it up.  Any concerns about the look not being the same as looking down on my plumbers neck Scotty, Bettinardi, or Mizuno versions that I have were put to rest immediately.  I have been one that jumps from putter to putter gravitating to Anser style or a smaller profile winged mallet such as a Cameron Phantom 5.5 as a backup.  If my putting hit a rough patch, all too often my answer was a new putter or to recycle one from my existing inventory.  I have a bag full of thousands of dollars worth of putters as evidence ,and I told my buddies that after the past several weeks putting with this putter, that I am selling every other putter I have, and getting another B.2 and a Mezz as a backup if I want to put a mallet style in play.  I am the type of person that does not get rid of putters ,but I do not see the putters I have gotten before this opportunity to review the B.2 making their way back in the bag.  I have putted with this putter almost exclusively since receiving it.  It is hands down the BEST putter I have ever used in every way, feel, weight, look, performance, everything.  This putter is quickly becoming my FAVORITE club. 

     
    Aesthetics 4.9/5 Stars
     
    The B.2 is very much the minimalist in looks for the LAB lineup.  It looks similar to some other center shafted putters on the market.  The graphics and badging are very simple and fit very well with the look of this putter.  I think the particular putter I got with the stainless steel head on the White LAGolf shaft looks awesome together.  I have several very good looking Scotty Cameron Putters and this is the best looking putter in my lineup of putters.  The look of this putter is very simple and traditional and though this is not the way of most putters currently on the market, I for one like this traditional simple look.  There is only one complaint that I have about this putter and it is purely due to the fact that I do not like to bend over and pick up my gimmies.  This putter offers no way to scoop up the ball with the back edge of the putter.  This is the reason for the 4.9 as I like to be able to rake up a ball with the back of my putter on the green.  This putter is not flashy but it does draw attention more than any other putter I have played with.  I constantly am being asked what kind of putter it is usually followed by “dang that’s nice”.
     
    The feel of the ball off the face of this putter is very soft and muted.  If the ball is struck center face it is like butter.  Sound of impact is a very subtle muted sound, it’s a very light click.   In line with most aspects of this putter, very subtle.  I did find a much more harsh clicky feel if the ball creeps too far up in my stance and the leading edge of the blade impacts the ball.  It gives immediate and punitive feedback on a mishit.  There are no claims made by the OEM of exceptional forgiveness with the B.2 and for good reason.  LAB has much more forgiving offerings but this is definitely not one and it’s not supposed to be.  It is very evident when center face contact is not achieved.  There is distinct feedback in sound and feel.  If you do not make sweet spot contact this putter will let you know  and performance numbers will definitely suffer.

     
    The Numbers (5.0/5)
     
    The numbers where the rubber meets the road.  Looks, feel, etc. all are insignificant if the ball isn’t going in the hole with less attempts.  For me this putter does.  One area that I have noticed a big improvement is the number of 3 putts.  The thing that took the most getting used to with this putter was judging speed on 20+ foot putts.  Once I did a few drills for lag putting I was quickly able to adjust to the feel of this putter.  As I stated above I have always gravitated toward Anser style putters but over the last couple of years I have started playing some Mallet style putters like Phantom 5.5 basically blade putter with wings.  I did this because I was not aligning correctly or getting the ball started on line consistently with my blade putters.  I would putt with it a few rounds and then go back to my blade putter.  With the B.2 it is like point and click.  I am consistently getting the ball started on line better than I ever have.  The B.2 is very easy to line up square.  This combined with very solid distance control is a huge reason why my 3 putts are way down.  I did quite a bit of putting on my Exputt putting simulator on putts from 5’ to 30’ feet.  I made a comparison of the B.2 and  my previous main putter, a Bettinardi BB-1 and I  found that the path and face angle with the B.2 were much more consistently square at impact.  I had a much lower amount of deviation from square with the B.2 as well.  This translates to much tighter dispersion right and left.  As I pointed out before, forgiveness is not the forte of this putter.  Intentional misses high, low  or heel, toe on the face of the putter were penalized pretty severely.  They lost line and distance significantly.  Centerface contact is a must.  That being said a well struck putt with this putter rolls flawlessly and holds its line with immediate end over end roll.  I had the grooved face version of this putter and I love the way the ball rolls out.  This putter is very solid from the tight fringe as well.  I wish I could say I am holing 20’ footers left and right but I am getting putts in the hole in less strokes and have occasionally hole a bomb or two.  Longest putt holed so far with the B.2 is  76’ double breaker uphill first half and downhill to the hole.  Longest putt attempted with the B.2 is  96’ and didn’t 3 putt (yes while it was a G.I.R. it did not help my proximity numbers).  



    On-Course (5.0/5
     
    As I have said throughout this review I absolutely love this club (except on gimmies).  The place where this putter shines is those 4’ or less putts, especially little breakers.  This putter is money.  Line up, set the putter down, and stroke it in the back of the cup.  I did not start playing competitive golf until adulthood and I have always struggled on the knee knocker 3’-5’ putts that you just have to make.  I played the State Amatuer Qualifying tournament last week and had zero 3 putts in a competition round.  This is in large part to this putter and the confidence I have with it in my hands.  I am excited to get on the greens and putt.  I feel like even on the long snakey putts they are going to have a chance to go in and if not I will make the next putt.  The only thing about this putter that I would add or change is a way to scoop the ball off the green without bending over (or putting the plunger pick up on the butt of the club).  Until I give the Mezz a try at some point this putter is not going anywhere.  In fact I may need to order a twin just in case.
     

     
    The Good, the bad, the inbetween (5.0/5)
     
    I was very pleased with all aspects of this experience.  I was very pleased with the fitting process, the order process, and customization options.  I did not have any issues with the OEM.  I know some of the other reviewers of this product have spoken to some of the key personnel at LAB, I did not speak to them other than the email I received with my fitting specs.  I really did not have any additional questions or concerns so I did not have an issue with this.  I was very pleased with the process and the product.

     

    Play it or Trade it? (5.0/5)
     
    Pretty sure that if you have read this far in the review the answer to this is very apparent.  This club is in my bag and I do not see that changing (unless I get a Mezz and give it a try).  



    Conclusion
     
    I had considered the purchase of a LAB putter over the last year or so.  I have a buddy with the LAB spaceship model.  As a blade style preferred putter, I just could not pull the trigger on that putter based on the size alone.  I did stroke some putts with his, and immediately it is clear that there is something to the technology unlike anything on the market.  When I got the opportunity to test this technology in a blade style putter and the ability to customize with the LA GOLF shaft fit to my specs, I hit the jackpot.  Low and behold the putter arrived and it was better than I expected.  I am a believer in this Lie Angle Balanced technology.  American Express says, “don't leave home without it”.  For me, Lie Angle Balanced “don’t go on the green without it”
     
    Final Score (29.9 out of 30 stars)










     
  21. Like
    mynerds got a reaction from JerBooth in Spornia SPG8 XL Net   
    Sporina SPG-8 XL Net – Official MGS Forum Review by mynerds
    Introduction - May 31, 2022
    A full introduction can be found in the comments section.
    Thank you to Sporina and MyGolfSpy for this amazing testing opportunity!
    Hello! My name is Mark, I am a high-handicap player near Chicago and have played golf mostly in social contexts like Top Golf and par 3 courses for a few decades. I am a natural righty, but golf lefty. By day, I work as a cybersecurity consultant. By night, I am husband, dad, and fur-dad to these three:

    My daily schedule is chaotic with both my wife and I juggling full-time jobs and chasing around our sassy toddler, so I am not always in control of when I get to practice.  When I can find time to get to the range, I find myself trying to “get my money’s worth” and hit as many balls as possible even when slower, shorter, deliberate practice would be more beneficial. I will be testing the net both indoors and outdoors, and tracking any discernible improvement to my golf game that regular, frequent practice may bring.
    I’m extremely excited to test the Sporina SPG-8 XL Net and have high expectations given the SPG-7’s status as MGS’ Best Golf Hitting Net 2021.
    First Impressions (4 out of 5)
    My full first impressions can be found in the comments section.
    The shipping weight of the product is 30lbs. For reference, below is the package up against my sedan and all 5'10" of my wiry self with the unboxed net in the carrying bag.



    My first point of inspection was the quality of stitching on the bag. Unfortunately I spotted areas with less-than-stellar stitching and several spots with loose or frayed threads:

    I also inspected the quality of the roof pole channel which was a weak point for the SPG-7. It was the thinnest material on the SPG-8 by far - even thinner than the material for the bag. Despite the thinness of the material, the roof pole channel did not tear though I did find threading the roof pole challenging.
    Taped to the outside of the box in a "packing slip" container was not a packing slip but instead a supplemental instruction and warning that "the spring steel opens forcefully" and that set up should occur "far away from people vehicles, and structures." Typos galore aside, this warning should be heeded.



    Minus one star for the stitching issues and the thin roof pole channel material, despite its previously documented weakness.
    Aesthetics (5 out of 5)
    With everything set up, it became clear that the "XL" is no misnomer. It is difficult to adequately describe how imposing this thing is.

    There are a few temporary hitting nets in my neighbors’ yards. To me, other nets seem like toys and the SPG-8 seems more like a tool. I love the look of the net and didn’t mind leaving it out for prolonged periods of time. Even as a "portable" net, I wanted to minimize my setup time. I shared some details on how I’ve left the net mostly assembled while retaining my garage parking space in the comments.


    The Numbers (3 out of 5)
    At the beginning of the test, I expected the SPG-8 to catch every single ball. Unfortunately, it did not meet this expectation. I kept count of every single ball that I hit, balls which were caught but bounced out of the net, and balls that missed the net entirely. Out of 600 balls hit, 27 (4.5%) were caught but bounced out of the net, and 2 missed the net entirely. Further, 3 balls were caught by the net but still managed to contact the wall behind it, more than a foot away. While the wall was not damaged, there are small indentations and marks on the drywall.

    Video.mov
    Spornia lists “Ball rolls gently down not touching the floors” as a “main feature” of the product. They make smaller nets (presumably for better players) and, as their largest and most expensive option, I expected it to contain all my shots. Minus 1 star each for the ~5% of balls that bounced out of the net, and for the balls that missed the net entirely.
    On the Course (5 out of 5)
    Did use of the net translate to improvements on the course? I’ve gained confidence in my irons, improved my dispersion, and am carrying the ball 15 yards further than a month ago. Here is Rapsodo's analysis of a session using my 9i compared from a month ago (left) to this week (right).

    In terms of results, I played my personal best round at the local municipal 9-hole and (using the WHS adjusted gross score) broke 50 there for the first time and had my first true par on a par-4.
    While the performance gains are a product of several things (see the next section), the net was the catalyst for bringing all the pieces together. Without question, I would not have seen these same improvements without the net.
    The Good, the bad, the inbetween (3 out of 5)
    By itself, I don’t believe any net alone is enough to improve your game. To achieve its full value, I needed to also purchase a launch monitor, quality hitting mat, and follow at home lessons/drills. Before purchasing the launch monitor specifically, I was developing bad habits hitting into the net that I only recognized once I was on the range. Once the launch monitor was in hand, I was able to recognize my mistakes and work towards correcting them.
    Minus one star against Spornia’s main feature claim of “get instant feedback on your shots” – it just wasn’t true for me.
    A quick note on the chipping net – I ended up using it only once. I already owned a small chipping net and if I’m working on my wedges, I’m just not going to spend the time attaching the Spornia net to the SPG-8. No fault of Spornia there, it just isn’t an important feature of the net to me.
    The testers also fielded a few questions to customer support via MGS to clarify the purpose of white strap on the net, the Velcro straps, how to use the support ropes, and whether we were missing tie down stakes. Minus one star for unclear instructions and lack of customer service response. I’ll update with any future communications though.
    Lastly, after getting used to the setup and takedown process I was able to reduce my setup time to 1:04 without the roof net and 3:17 with the roof net. Threading the roof channel really is the weakest aspect of the net.


    Play it or Trade it? (5 out of 5)
    Without question, I will be playing with the SPG-8 for the remainder of the season and am looking forward to its use indoors over the long Chicago winters. I will continue to improve my hitting area and hope to add heaters and possibly a projector to create a true indoor hitting simulator. Where breaking 100 seemed like a lofty goal 6 months ago, now breaking 90 seems like a potential goal for next year. Without this net, I don't believe that goal would be possible.
    Conclusion (25 out of 30 stars)
    Overall, the Spornia SPG-8 XL edition lives up to its name as an extra large hitting net. While the extra foot of coverage may benefit high handicappers like me who struggle with the occasional extremely off-center shot, even the XL edition missed a few of my shots that would have ended up in neighbors yards had I been outside at the time.
    If you’re in the market for a hitting net, I would recommend the SPG-8 only if 1) cost isn’t your highest priority or 2) if you’re looking to use it as part of a golf simulator with their projector-friendly target sheet. Otherwise, I would recommend the SPG-7 instead, and use any cost savings towards a high quality hitting mat and/or indoor launch monitor for a complete at-home hitting experience.
  22. Like
    mynerds got a reaction from cciciora13 in Spornia SPG8 XL Net   
    Sporina SPG-8 XL Net – Official MGS Forum Review by mynerds
    Introduction - May 31, 2022
    A full introduction can be found in the comments section.
    Thank you to Sporina and MyGolfSpy for this amazing testing opportunity!
    Hello! My name is Mark, I am a high-handicap player near Chicago and have played golf mostly in social contexts like Top Golf and par 3 courses for a few decades. I am a natural righty, but golf lefty. By day, I work as a cybersecurity consultant. By night, I am husband, dad, and fur-dad to these three:

    My daily schedule is chaotic with both my wife and I juggling full-time jobs and chasing around our sassy toddler, so I am not always in control of when I get to practice.  When I can find time to get to the range, I find myself trying to “get my money’s worth” and hit as many balls as possible even when slower, shorter, deliberate practice would be more beneficial. I will be testing the net both indoors and outdoors, and tracking any discernible improvement to my golf game that regular, frequent practice may bring.
    I’m extremely excited to test the Sporina SPG-8 XL Net and have high expectations given the SPG-7’s status as MGS’ Best Golf Hitting Net 2021.
    First Impressions (4 out of 5)
    My full first impressions can be found in the comments section.
    The shipping weight of the product is 30lbs. For reference, below is the package up against my sedan and all 5'10" of my wiry self with the unboxed net in the carrying bag.



    My first point of inspection was the quality of stitching on the bag. Unfortunately I spotted areas with less-than-stellar stitching and several spots with loose or frayed threads:

    I also inspected the quality of the roof pole channel which was a weak point for the SPG-7. It was the thinnest material on the SPG-8 by far - even thinner than the material for the bag. Despite the thinness of the material, the roof pole channel did not tear though I did find threading the roof pole challenging.
    Taped to the outside of the box in a "packing slip" container was not a packing slip but instead a supplemental instruction and warning that "the spring steel opens forcefully" and that set up should occur "far away from people vehicles, and structures." Typos galore aside, this warning should be heeded.



    Minus one star for the stitching issues and the thin roof pole channel material, despite its previously documented weakness.
    Aesthetics (5 out of 5)
    With everything set up, it became clear that the "XL" is no misnomer. It is difficult to adequately describe how imposing this thing is.

    There are a few temporary hitting nets in my neighbors’ yards. To me, other nets seem like toys and the SPG-8 seems more like a tool. I love the look of the net and didn’t mind leaving it out for prolonged periods of time. Even as a "portable" net, I wanted to minimize my setup time. I shared some details on how I’ve left the net mostly assembled while retaining my garage parking space in the comments.


    The Numbers (3 out of 5)
    At the beginning of the test, I expected the SPG-8 to catch every single ball. Unfortunately, it did not meet this expectation. I kept count of every single ball that I hit, balls which were caught but bounced out of the net, and balls that missed the net entirely. Out of 600 balls hit, 27 (4.5%) were caught but bounced out of the net, and 2 missed the net entirely. Further, 3 balls were caught by the net but still managed to contact the wall behind it, more than a foot away. While the wall was not damaged, there are small indentations and marks on the drywall.

    Video.mov
    Spornia lists “Ball rolls gently down not touching the floors” as a “main feature” of the product. They make smaller nets (presumably for better players) and, as their largest and most expensive option, I expected it to contain all my shots. Minus 1 star each for the ~5% of balls that bounced out of the net, and for the balls that missed the net entirely.
    On the Course (5 out of 5)
    Did use of the net translate to improvements on the course? I’ve gained confidence in my irons, improved my dispersion, and am carrying the ball 15 yards further than a month ago. Here is Rapsodo's analysis of a session using my 9i compared from a month ago (left) to this week (right).

    In terms of results, I played my personal best round at the local municipal 9-hole and (using the WHS adjusted gross score) broke 50 there for the first time and had my first true par on a par-4.
    While the performance gains are a product of several things (see the next section), the net was the catalyst for bringing all the pieces together. Without question, I would not have seen these same improvements without the net.
    The Good, the bad, the inbetween (3 out of 5)
    By itself, I don’t believe any net alone is enough to improve your game. To achieve its full value, I needed to also purchase a launch monitor, quality hitting mat, and follow at home lessons/drills. Before purchasing the launch monitor specifically, I was developing bad habits hitting into the net that I only recognized once I was on the range. Once the launch monitor was in hand, I was able to recognize my mistakes and work towards correcting them.
    Minus one star against Spornia’s main feature claim of “get instant feedback on your shots” – it just wasn’t true for me.
    A quick note on the chipping net – I ended up using it only once. I already owned a small chipping net and if I’m working on my wedges, I’m just not going to spend the time attaching the Spornia net to the SPG-8. No fault of Spornia there, it just isn’t an important feature of the net to me.
    The testers also fielded a few questions to customer support via MGS to clarify the purpose of white strap on the net, the Velcro straps, how to use the support ropes, and whether we were missing tie down stakes. Minus one star for unclear instructions and lack of customer service response. I’ll update with any future communications though.
    Lastly, after getting used to the setup and takedown process I was able to reduce my setup time to 1:04 without the roof net and 3:17 with the roof net. Threading the roof channel really is the weakest aspect of the net.


    Play it or Trade it? (5 out of 5)
    Without question, I will be playing with the SPG-8 for the remainder of the season and am looking forward to its use indoors over the long Chicago winters. I will continue to improve my hitting area and hope to add heaters and possibly a projector to create a true indoor hitting simulator. Where breaking 100 seemed like a lofty goal 6 months ago, now breaking 90 seems like a potential goal for next year. Without this net, I don't believe that goal would be possible.
    Conclusion (25 out of 30 stars)
    Overall, the Spornia SPG-8 XL edition lives up to its name as an extra large hitting net. While the extra foot of coverage may benefit high handicappers like me who struggle with the occasional extremely off-center shot, even the XL edition missed a few of my shots that would have ended up in neighbors yards had I been outside at the time.
    If you’re in the market for a hitting net, I would recommend the SPG-8 only if 1) cost isn’t your highest priority or 2) if you’re looking to use it as part of a golf simulator with their projector-friendly target sheet. Otherwise, I would recommend the SPG-7 instead, and use any cost savings towards a high quality hitting mat and/or indoor launch monitor for a complete at-home hitting experience.
  23. Love
    mynerds got a reaction from sirchunksalot in Spornia SPG8 XL Net   
    Sporina SPG-8 XL Net – Official MGS Forum Review by mynerds
    Introduction - May 31, 2022
    A full introduction can be found in the comments section.
    Thank you to Sporina and MyGolfSpy for this amazing testing opportunity!
    Hello! My name is Mark, I am a high-handicap player near Chicago and have played golf mostly in social contexts like Top Golf and par 3 courses for a few decades. I am a natural righty, but golf lefty. By day, I work as a cybersecurity consultant. By night, I am husband, dad, and fur-dad to these three:

    My daily schedule is chaotic with both my wife and I juggling full-time jobs and chasing around our sassy toddler, so I am not always in control of when I get to practice.  When I can find time to get to the range, I find myself trying to “get my money’s worth” and hit as many balls as possible even when slower, shorter, deliberate practice would be more beneficial. I will be testing the net both indoors and outdoors, and tracking any discernible improvement to my golf game that regular, frequent practice may bring.
    I’m extremely excited to test the Sporina SPG-8 XL Net and have high expectations given the SPG-7’s status as MGS’ Best Golf Hitting Net 2021.
    First Impressions (4 out of 5)
    My full first impressions can be found in the comments section.
    The shipping weight of the product is 30lbs. For reference, below is the package up against my sedan and all 5'10" of my wiry self with the unboxed net in the carrying bag.



    My first point of inspection was the quality of stitching on the bag. Unfortunately I spotted areas with less-than-stellar stitching and several spots with loose or frayed threads:

    I also inspected the quality of the roof pole channel which was a weak point for the SPG-7. It was the thinnest material on the SPG-8 by far - even thinner than the material for the bag. Despite the thinness of the material, the roof pole channel did not tear though I did find threading the roof pole challenging.
    Taped to the outside of the box in a "packing slip" container was not a packing slip but instead a supplemental instruction and warning that "the spring steel opens forcefully" and that set up should occur "far away from people vehicles, and structures." Typos galore aside, this warning should be heeded.



    Minus one star for the stitching issues and the thin roof pole channel material, despite its previously documented weakness.
    Aesthetics (5 out of 5)
    With everything set up, it became clear that the "XL" is no misnomer. It is difficult to adequately describe how imposing this thing is.

    There are a few temporary hitting nets in my neighbors’ yards. To me, other nets seem like toys and the SPG-8 seems more like a tool. I love the look of the net and didn’t mind leaving it out for prolonged periods of time. Even as a "portable" net, I wanted to minimize my setup time. I shared some details on how I’ve left the net mostly assembled while retaining my garage parking space in the comments.


    The Numbers (3 out of 5)
    At the beginning of the test, I expected the SPG-8 to catch every single ball. Unfortunately, it did not meet this expectation. I kept count of every single ball that I hit, balls which were caught but bounced out of the net, and balls that missed the net entirely. Out of 600 balls hit, 27 (4.5%) were caught but bounced out of the net, and 2 missed the net entirely. Further, 3 balls were caught by the net but still managed to contact the wall behind it, more than a foot away. While the wall was not damaged, there are small indentations and marks on the drywall.

    Video.mov
    Spornia lists “Ball rolls gently down not touching the floors” as a “main feature” of the product. They make smaller nets (presumably for better players) and, as their largest and most expensive option, I expected it to contain all my shots. Minus 1 star each for the ~5% of balls that bounced out of the net, and for the balls that missed the net entirely.
    On the Course (5 out of 5)
    Did use of the net translate to improvements on the course? I’ve gained confidence in my irons, improved my dispersion, and am carrying the ball 15 yards further than a month ago. Here is Rapsodo's analysis of a session using my 9i compared from a month ago (left) to this week (right).

    In terms of results, I played my personal best round at the local municipal 9-hole and (using the WHS adjusted gross score) broke 50 there for the first time and had my first true par on a par-4.
    While the performance gains are a product of several things (see the next section), the net was the catalyst for bringing all the pieces together. Without question, I would not have seen these same improvements without the net.
    The Good, the bad, the inbetween (3 out of 5)
    By itself, I don’t believe any net alone is enough to improve your game. To achieve its full value, I needed to also purchase a launch monitor, quality hitting mat, and follow at home lessons/drills. Before purchasing the launch monitor specifically, I was developing bad habits hitting into the net that I only recognized once I was on the range. Once the launch monitor was in hand, I was able to recognize my mistakes and work towards correcting them.
    Minus one star against Spornia’s main feature claim of “get instant feedback on your shots” – it just wasn’t true for me.
    A quick note on the chipping net – I ended up using it only once. I already owned a small chipping net and if I’m working on my wedges, I’m just not going to spend the time attaching the Spornia net to the SPG-8. No fault of Spornia there, it just isn’t an important feature of the net to me.
    The testers also fielded a few questions to customer support via MGS to clarify the purpose of white strap on the net, the Velcro straps, how to use the support ropes, and whether we were missing tie down stakes. Minus one star for unclear instructions and lack of customer service response. I’ll update with any future communications though.
    Lastly, after getting used to the setup and takedown process I was able to reduce my setup time to 1:04 without the roof net and 3:17 with the roof net. Threading the roof channel really is the weakest aspect of the net.


    Play it or Trade it? (5 out of 5)
    Without question, I will be playing with the SPG-8 for the remainder of the season and am looking forward to its use indoors over the long Chicago winters. I will continue to improve my hitting area and hope to add heaters and possibly a projector to create a true indoor hitting simulator. Where breaking 100 seemed like a lofty goal 6 months ago, now breaking 90 seems like a potential goal for next year. Without this net, I don't believe that goal would be possible.
    Conclusion (25 out of 30 stars)
    Overall, the Spornia SPG-8 XL edition lives up to its name as an extra large hitting net. While the extra foot of coverage may benefit high handicappers like me who struggle with the occasional extremely off-center shot, even the XL edition missed a few of my shots that would have ended up in neighbors yards had I been outside at the time.
    If you’re in the market for a hitting net, I would recommend the SPG-8 only if 1) cost isn’t your highest priority or 2) if you’re looking to use it as part of a golf simulator with their projector-friendly target sheet. Otherwise, I would recommend the SPG-7 instead, and use any cost savings towards a high quality hitting mat and/or indoor launch monitor for a complete at-home hitting experience.
  24. Like
    mynerds got a reaction from goaliewales14 in Spornia SPG8 XL Net   
    Sporina SPG-8 XL Net – Official MGS Forum Review by mynerds
    Introduction - May 31, 2022
    A full introduction can be found in the comments section.
    Thank you to Sporina and MyGolfSpy for this amazing testing opportunity!
    Hello! My name is Mark, I am a high-handicap player near Chicago and have played golf mostly in social contexts like Top Golf and par 3 courses for a few decades. I am a natural righty, but golf lefty. By day, I work as a cybersecurity consultant. By night, I am husband, dad, and fur-dad to these three:

    My daily schedule is chaotic with both my wife and I juggling full-time jobs and chasing around our sassy toddler, so I am not always in control of when I get to practice.  When I can find time to get to the range, I find myself trying to “get my money’s worth” and hit as many balls as possible even when slower, shorter, deliberate practice would be more beneficial. I will be testing the net both indoors and outdoors, and tracking any discernible improvement to my golf game that regular, frequent practice may bring.
    I’m extremely excited to test the Sporina SPG-8 XL Net and have high expectations given the SPG-7’s status as MGS’ Best Golf Hitting Net 2021.
    First Impressions (4 out of 5)
    My full first impressions can be found in the comments section.
    The shipping weight of the product is 30lbs. For reference, below is the package up against my sedan and all 5'10" of my wiry self with the unboxed net in the carrying bag.



    My first point of inspection was the quality of stitching on the bag. Unfortunately I spotted areas with less-than-stellar stitching and several spots with loose or frayed threads:

    I also inspected the quality of the roof pole channel which was a weak point for the SPG-7. It was the thinnest material on the SPG-8 by far - even thinner than the material for the bag. Despite the thinness of the material, the roof pole channel did not tear though I did find threading the roof pole challenging.
    Taped to the outside of the box in a "packing slip" container was not a packing slip but instead a supplemental instruction and warning that "the spring steel opens forcefully" and that set up should occur "far away from people vehicles, and structures." Typos galore aside, this warning should be heeded.



    Minus one star for the stitching issues and the thin roof pole channel material, despite its previously documented weakness.
    Aesthetics (5 out of 5)
    With everything set up, it became clear that the "XL" is no misnomer. It is difficult to adequately describe how imposing this thing is.

    There are a few temporary hitting nets in my neighbors’ yards. To me, other nets seem like toys and the SPG-8 seems more like a tool. I love the look of the net and didn’t mind leaving it out for prolonged periods of time. Even as a "portable" net, I wanted to minimize my setup time. I shared some details on how I’ve left the net mostly assembled while retaining my garage parking space in the comments.


    The Numbers (3 out of 5)
    At the beginning of the test, I expected the SPG-8 to catch every single ball. Unfortunately, it did not meet this expectation. I kept count of every single ball that I hit, balls which were caught but bounced out of the net, and balls that missed the net entirely. Out of 600 balls hit, 27 (4.5%) were caught but bounced out of the net, and 2 missed the net entirely. Further, 3 balls were caught by the net but still managed to contact the wall behind it, more than a foot away. While the wall was not damaged, there are small indentations and marks on the drywall.

    Video.mov
    Spornia lists “Ball rolls gently down not touching the floors” as a “main feature” of the product. They make smaller nets (presumably for better players) and, as their largest and most expensive option, I expected it to contain all my shots. Minus 1 star each for the ~5% of balls that bounced out of the net, and for the balls that missed the net entirely.
    On the Course (5 out of 5)
    Did use of the net translate to improvements on the course? I’ve gained confidence in my irons, improved my dispersion, and am carrying the ball 15 yards further than a month ago. Here is Rapsodo's analysis of a session using my 9i compared from a month ago (left) to this week (right).

    In terms of results, I played my personal best round at the local municipal 9-hole and (using the WHS adjusted gross score) broke 50 there for the first time and had my first true par on a par-4.
    While the performance gains are a product of several things (see the next section), the net was the catalyst for bringing all the pieces together. Without question, I would not have seen these same improvements without the net.
    The Good, the bad, the inbetween (3 out of 5)
    By itself, I don’t believe any net alone is enough to improve your game. To achieve its full value, I needed to also purchase a launch monitor, quality hitting mat, and follow at home lessons/drills. Before purchasing the launch monitor specifically, I was developing bad habits hitting into the net that I only recognized once I was on the range. Once the launch monitor was in hand, I was able to recognize my mistakes and work towards correcting them.
    Minus one star against Spornia’s main feature claim of “get instant feedback on your shots” – it just wasn’t true for me.
    A quick note on the chipping net – I ended up using it only once. I already owned a small chipping net and if I’m working on my wedges, I’m just not going to spend the time attaching the Spornia net to the SPG-8. No fault of Spornia there, it just isn’t an important feature of the net to me.
    The testers also fielded a few questions to customer support via MGS to clarify the purpose of white strap on the net, the Velcro straps, how to use the support ropes, and whether we were missing tie down stakes. Minus one star for unclear instructions and lack of customer service response. I’ll update with any future communications though.
    Lastly, after getting used to the setup and takedown process I was able to reduce my setup time to 1:04 without the roof net and 3:17 with the roof net. Threading the roof channel really is the weakest aspect of the net.


    Play it or Trade it? (5 out of 5)
    Without question, I will be playing with the SPG-8 for the remainder of the season and am looking forward to its use indoors over the long Chicago winters. I will continue to improve my hitting area and hope to add heaters and possibly a projector to create a true indoor hitting simulator. Where breaking 100 seemed like a lofty goal 6 months ago, now breaking 90 seems like a potential goal for next year. Without this net, I don't believe that goal would be possible.
    Conclusion (25 out of 30 stars)
    Overall, the Spornia SPG-8 XL edition lives up to its name as an extra large hitting net. While the extra foot of coverage may benefit high handicappers like me who struggle with the occasional extremely off-center shot, even the XL edition missed a few of my shots that would have ended up in neighbors yards had I been outside at the time.
    If you’re in the market for a hitting net, I would recommend the SPG-8 only if 1) cost isn’t your highest priority or 2) if you’re looking to use it as part of a golf simulator with their projector-friendly target sheet. Otherwise, I would recommend the SPG-7 instead, and use any cost savings towards a high quality hitting mat and/or indoor launch monitor for a complete at-home hitting experience.
  25. Like
    mynerds reacted to GrumpyGolf in Edel SMS Wedges   
    Edel SMS Wedges – Official MGS Forum Review by GrumpyGolf
    Intro  - May 29, 2022
    For a full introduction in the comments section click here
    First off, I am grateful to have been selected for this set of testing. I am picking up the game again after an eighteen-and-a-half-year hiatus due to family, work, and general unexpected (or maybe should have expected) life happenings.  With most of that behind us, my wife decided it was time for me to get back out on the course (and maybe give her some time away from me 😉). 
    During fitting I was fitted with the following specs:
    50°, 54°, and 58° C-Grind with 2g/8g/10g weight dispersion KBS Tour Wedge - S +1" Tour Velvet - Std As for this test, I plan on testing out the wedges in three different manners – in the simulator (to get the spins, trajectories, etc.…), on the range (distances and shot groupings), and the chipping/putting green (feel and short shots with stopping power).  I will be using my current wedges as a baseline only but considering the loft differences I really am going to rely on my own experiences with the Edel wedges.
    I said before that I was excited to get a chance to test wedges in my first go round on MGS, I mean that because my wedge game was the best part of my game before. I practiced flop shot more than anything else just because I thought they looked cool (reality is if I needed a flop shot one in a round, I was lucky). But wedge shots in general were good for me as I was usually 20-30 yds off the green back then.
    What's in the box: Click here to see the box opening for the the Edel wedges.
    First Usage and QA of Wedges: Click here to see initial usage thoughts as well as the actual QA of the wedges themselves.
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