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elight

Member
  • Posts

    94
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Profile Information

  • Location
    Allentown, PA

Player Profile

  • Age
    40-49
  • Swing Speed
    91-100 mph
  • Handicap
    18
  • Frequency of Play/Practice
    Weekly
  • Player Type
    Weekend Golfer
  • Biggest Strength
    Driver/Off the Tee
  • Biggest Weakness
    Approach
  • Fitted for Clubs
    Yes

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elight's Achievements

  1. Taking too long to look for a ball that's almost certainly lost. I totally get the ball rolling off the fairway a few feet into the rough and wanting to find it because you SHOULD find it. But when you hit it over the trees into the tall grass or onto the next hole, you really need to take one quick look and if you don't get lucky and find it right away, drop one and move on with your life.
  2. Last year I used a Garmin S60. I didn't think I'd like wearing a watch but actually was fine with it. I loved the shot tracking, even though you had to select the club after each shot. You enter the score manually at the end of each hole. I'm considering upgrading to the S62 (the S70 just costs too much), but now I have to consider the Shotscope X5 after reading this. I do like being able to tap on the hole map on the Garmin watches to get distances, but better shot tracking with the club tags might be more beneficial.
  3. Agree re: home practice. Even a very basic setup of a cheap net and decent mat. Much easier to find 15 minutes of practice time at home compared to heading to driving range.
  4. I tested a lot of balls this year. I settled on a Maxfli Tour S. But I think my second choice, when considering cost and performance, is the Hammer Control. For whatever reason, I play well with it. I don't think it's worth paying more for other non-urethane offerings.
  5. I have a Caddytek that's very similar to the one pictured above, but without the rear storage bag and the hand brake. I would really like those two features. I have been happy with mine and it's already paid for itself many times over. Only thing I didn't like was the cup holder which was too small and constantly fell off. I replaced it with a clamp-on cup holder designed for senior walkers (like at a nursing home, not a golf course).
  6. Having a nearby 9-hole course is really great in our situation. Why? Because they let you play 9 holes any time you want. Most busy courses will not let you play 9 during peak times so that they can maximize their revenue. The 9-hole course near me (which I could ALWAYS get a tee time on, even at 10pm the night prior) closed abruptly this past year. I switched over to my local muni, which also has the benefits of allowing 9 hole play and walking at all times, but getting a tee time for a weekend morning is very hit-or-miss. I've come to learn that they pre-book most of those weekend morning tee times for their "regulars" even though it's their policy not to. Having a nearby 9-hole course is really great in our situation. Why? Because they let you play 9 holes any time you want. Most busy courses will not let you play 9 during peak times so that they can maximize their revenue. The 9-hole course near me (which I could ALWAYS get a tee time on, even at 10pm the night prior) closed abruptly this past year. I switched over to my local muni, which also has the benefits of allowing 9 hole play and walking at all times, but getting a tee time for a weekend morning is very hit-or-miss. I've come to learn that they pre-book most of those weekend morning tee times for their "regulars" even though it's their policy not to.
  7. Understanding the game better has helped me to avoid the meltdown. I used to meltdown out of frustration because I was playing terribly but didn't know why. It seemed like nothing worked and I felt helpless. Once I learned why I was getting these results, I came to peace with it - at least it made sense. Unfortunately I can't fix everything overnight but at least I can accept the reasons for my poor play and know there's a path to improving.
  8. For me: 1. Find a time in your weekly schedule that will be the least obtrusive to your family. For me, it's early weekend mornings. 2. Get comfortable playing more 9 hole rounds than 18 hole rounds. Play the courses closest to your house even if they're not your favorite. 3. Eventually, bring a child with you when you can. Not only does this help the wife, it's great bonding time (even if the child isn't playing). 4. Find a way to practice at home either early morning, after bedtime, or during nap time. You don't need a full simulator - a hitting mat and net in the garage or backyard will do it. In other words, it's about compromise. Accept that this time in your life will not be your peak golfing years (in terms of hours spent), and that's OK, because you have other important priorities.
  9. I have a ton of leftover lower-end balls from my personal ball test this past year. I also have 6 dozen Maxfli Tour S balls that I picked up on sale after deciding that this is the ball I'll be playing moving forward. This past weekend I had some great weather and got 9 holes in. I decided that I might as well play a cheaper ball since it was winter golf. I played the cheapest ball I have - a Hammer Control - and tied my low score ever. So, I think I'm going to play through all the cheap balls I have (except the super soft ones) before making the switch to the Tour S when they run out.
  10. I had one of the more expensive GoSports nets, which is sold by Costco. It was fine, although the ball almost always came bouncing back at me (not a safety issue, just an annoyance). The frame was sturdy. Can't speak to the longevity of the net. I ultimately decided to return it, and bought a Spornia net instead.
  11. If you have the space, the Mevo+ will be good for you. Otherwise, maybe a Skytrak(+) if you don't need/want the Game Improvement Plan.
  12. I've used both. Mevo+ better in a static environment with the right parameters (enough space tee to screen), no subscriptions and better integrations (GSPro). MLM2Pro easier to setup and use out of the box, better for shorter indoor environments, cheaper (unless you own it 6+ years).
  13. Do they still make the PuttUp? I can't find any references to it anywhere other than MGS, including on the BirdieBall website.
  14. Since a 30' mat is out of the question for most people, do you think there's value to practicing such putting on standard house carpet? Obviously the speed and quality of the roll will be entirely different than on the course, but is this sort of training useful still by teaching you how to adapt to different putt lengths?
  15. Now that I've put together my basic garage sim setup, I am thinking about also putting together a basement putting practice setup, which might actually be more useful over the winter than working on my full swing. I am looking at the Birdieball indoor mats. They come in a myriad of sizes, from 2 to 6' wide, and from 10 to 30' long. I am definitely looking at either 3 or 4' wide, and between 10 and 14' long. The prices vary wildly, though, when you add just one or two feet. So I'm curious if others have feedback on what size is really necessary for a useful setup. My sense is that, as a high handicapper, I'd be very happy sinking more 8-10' foots, so that may be enough for now!
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