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Will_Mac

Member
  • Posts

    196
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Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Clayton, NC
  • Referred By:
    Google

Player Profile

  • Age
    50-59
  • Swing Speed
    101-110 mph
  • Handicap
    4.7
  • Frequency of Play/Practice
    Multiple times per week
  • Player Type
    Competitive
  • Biggest Strength
    Approach
  • Biggest Weakness
    Short Game
  • Fitted for Clubs
    No

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Will_Mac's Achievements

  1. I don't presently have similar in my bag, but as you described yours... I'd be all for that if it served my purposes wrt the course(s) I play. Bullet 200 yards vs high, soft landing 200 yards? Yup. I can work with each.
  2. I'm 56, and 5-iron has been long removed from the bag. It's not a SS issue as I'm still (thankfully) 110+ mph with driver. I just went the easier route with hybrid. And last year, I turned the easy route on its head. [emoji6] After seeing a video of then Korn Ferry Tour, now PGA Tour player Kevin Dougherty about his caddy cutting a 300 Mini-Driver down to 7W length, I followed suit. I already had a 300 Mini collecting dust in the corner, figured, what the heck? It's been tremendous for me. https://www.pgatour.com/video/video/6326263643112/kevin-dougherty-shows-off-his-mini-driver And, above 6-iron, I went unorthodox again with Cobra Radspeed one-length hybrids. They're 7-iron length, look goofy as all get-out, as if kids clubs. But I hit them straight and long. Nearly instantly forgot to care about how they look. I'm a decent golfer who can still hit 3-iron, as evidenced by a good range session recently with a buddy's. But, for me, it's a question of "why?" Now, 3-iron is a big leap from 5-iron. But, when I can hit other, even silly, clubs more easily than 5-iron? Then... "why not?" [emoji2369] I'm firmly in the why-not camp. Regardless of how odd the bag set-up may appear. I'll always just play what works (for me).
  3. I can't often feel a difference between balls of similar compression and cover construction. But from low compression to high? Surlyn to urethane? I can "feel" the difference. Sometimes far from the green, sometimes close. But, performance/results is king.
  4. I've played L.A.B. putters (formerly, Directed Force) since 2018. They just roll it best for me. Currently, back to where I started, the DF 2.1. I'd played traditional center-shafted putters in the past, preferred them. L.A.B. is just a step above what I'd tried previously.
  5. Logo looks like cat remains to me. Not the image I’d want to convey towards the end of my career. [emoji2371]
  6. That's a big boy at 120 lbs! I've never witnessed a Scott type that large before. My buddy's AB (Johnson type, is that correct?) named Murph was huge at about the same size. Big mush, that one, loved him. Thankfully, Gracie's prey drive is minimal. She will chase all wildlife vigorously, but it's just territorial as she gives up once they haul butt outta there. But she is fast as all hell. I've never seen a Mastiff move quite this fast, change direction so quickly, and be so athletic overall. I'm pretty sure your AB is similar. Our 120 lb Clyde, the Cane Corso, was also very fast at top speed. But because a significant case of hip dysplasia detected at 6 months old, he was never able to display his inner athleticism nor accelerate very quickly. But as to prey drive, the last dog of our fallen previous pack was a Shiloh Shepherd. If you haven't heard about the breed, look them up, they're an amazing breed of dog. A purebred developed by mixing American German Shepherd, (German) German Shepherd, and Alaskan Malamute. The effort was to realize a more even tempered Shepherd yet with stronger hips as benefit from the more dense bone structure of the Malamute. An unintended consequence, however, resulted in a dog larger than both the GSD and Malamute. Our "Foley" had a prey drive like no other. If not for his plush coat, he'd have made a fantastic hunting dog. So smart and easy to train, fast athletic, yet with the playful, eager to please, and gentle disposition of the typical Golden or Lab. Yet he possessed all the attention grabbing presence and cabilities of the GSD. The Shiloh would be the perfect breed of dog, imho, if not for that coat. While the Malamute bloodline certainly helped to sure up the breed's hips, the Shiloh also got the arctic dog's dense undercoat. I could brush that dog with an undercoat rake for 30 minutes or more and get as much hair out in the last minute as in the first. Absolutely crazy and sadly, that's the only reason why we'll likely never have one again. As much as I'm wholly indulging in Gracie, I'll miss our previous pack forever. Carly the Lab (80 lbs), Clyde the Cane Corso (120 lbs), Foley the Shiloh Shepherd (105 lbs):
  7. My Cane Corso rescue, Gracie. She might look serious, but she just may be the happiest and most loving dog we've ever had. He nubby tail is ever wagging, her jovial nature perpetually seeking play. She's not our first Cane Corso. Our "Clyde," was a big boy at 120 lbs and full representation of the breed. He was well socialized and a loving dog with family and friends. He accepted all who we accepted. But make no mistake, he took guarding as his mission. Well balanced, but serious, ever alert. But, Gracie? She's absolutely NONE of that! [emoji1787] And we'd have it no other way. She LOVES people and adores attention, especially from kids. Although their energy excites her, it's amazing how gentle she is with them. While she craves some roughousing with myself and family, she's unfailingly gentle with children. Next month will make a year with us. She's estimated to be 2.5 yrs old now. An emaciated 59 lbs when we got her, a healthy 74 lbs now. Small for a Cane Corso female, most definitely the runt of the litter. But her huge heart would contend with the best of them.
  8. I'd prefer the course to not look like the typical trip to Walmart. Work-casual isn't such a tough ask. People can say that's elitist, and I really don't give a crap. If a person showed up to a job interview in their pajamas, I wouldn't take into account their preference to feel comfortable. It isn't such a big deal to expect people to dress accordingly with regard to any particular situation. If not? Are dudes wearing bikinis or thongs acceptable on the course? Is that a bridge too far? Because to say that rules against wearing a t-shirt or jeans is elitist, then so is it also to say that a dude can't play bareback while wearing just a tutu. Ridiculous? Yup. The whole debate. If you're against the current limit. Who are you to set the next? Nothing but a fig-leaf for all. Check.
  9. PW. BUT... The asterisks being that my JPX-923 Pro irons' PW is only 42.5°. In previous sets where PW was 45°, 9-iron was my 150 club.
  10. No... idea... [emoji846] Last year, I went on a tear with the tried and true Z-Star from June through November. But once the chilly weather set in, and ever since, my scores suffered. I stuck with the Z-Star until last week when I played the RB Tour X for the very first time. I'd played the standard RB Tour extensively last spring and absolutely loved it. Only switched away because I was having issues tracking a white ball in the air. Yellow just appears darker to me against a light background, easier to track, and the RB Tour is only available in white. Hence, the switch (back) to the yellow Z-Star and the unrelated tear (set-up find) just so happened to occur with that ball in play at the time. So, I stuck with it. Back to the RB Tour X. Although my overall play has still been erratic lately regardless of ball, the clear to me fact is, is that the RB Tour X is a half-club longer off irons and seemingly 10+ yards with driver. So, consider my interest piqued and my willingness to give the X a chance, as high. Btw... in April of last year, I carded my first albatross with the standard RB Tour. I didn't see the ball drop, so it was an INCREDIBLE FEELING to discover that Mizuno running bird logo staring up at me from the bottom of the cup! So, there's also a rather huge sentimental attachment to these Mizuno balls. [emoji6]
  11. The only thing that stands out to me is when Precision Rifle went away from regular Rifle shafts (Tour Flighted Rifle was my favorite) and committed to Project-X steel shafts. LOVED the TFR shafts and had them in 3 different sets of irons. Project-X never worked for me in irons, tried various flexes, too. They did work well for me in the original Cleveland Mashie hybrids, though. Heavy, but worked. I still have those. [emoji846]
  12. I suffer from the same, along with stenosis, degenerative disks from lumbar to lower-thoracic, and rampant arthritis. L4/L5 is my worst area. Epidural shots have been a godsend, but after they wore off and I was hit with yet another herniation on 7/29, the unexpected happened. That is, insurance denied more shots. Twice. Road closed there, I feared. After a 7 week layoff, still too early to come back, and I knew it, I gambled. I'd previously bought an inexpensive sports back brace in 2019 but never even bothered to remove it from its original packaging. Desperate to play, I finally tried it out. It works. I can play. At a high level, at that, and my back feels very supported. The proof is in the post-round symptoms. They've been minimal. Even though the very unexpected happened, being that the doctor's office stayed on it, and insurance finally approved the shots (received them on 10/6), I've found the brace to still be best when playing. I played one round without it, and even with the shots' full effect, during the round, my back muscles became fatigued quickly. And post round was very uncomfortable. No pain, the meds take care of that. But the spasming was terrible. Used the brace again for the past two rounds, and I've felt awesome. This has been a very long story, LOL... to lead me to this. While I haven't yet had surgery, fellow golfers who have, had long recommended that I try using a back brace. I always resisted the thought. The idea seemed counterproductive to me as to freedom of movement. Prohibitive. And even though I bought mine in 2019, I only did so as a last resort measure that I never really planned to use. Well, for my condition, anyway... I should've listened to my friends long ago. It helps, protects, supports, and even provides warmth. It's terribly uncomfortable to put it on and drive to the course. But once playing, I honestly never consider it, not even once beyond the very first round. It doesn't at all inhibit any golf movement. No discomfort, I just lock-in and play. But, LOL... once the round is over, awareness of its tension registers once again, and I can't wait to rip it off post-round. But the danged thing works. I'll be using it to play until surgery becomes a necessity. Best of luck to you.
  13. I'm really liking Invasion on Apple+. Only, I hate waiting for the next episode to drop. [emoji6] The Continental on Peacock, John Wick prequel, has been very good. Only 3 episodes, but E3 is 1.5 hrs. Enjoyed it very much. Foundation on Apple+ is good, but it's a dip-in to watch an episode (maybe two) and bolt kinda deal for me. I really do like it, and sci-fi is right up my alley. Just, for whatever reason, it's hasn't yet ignited my binge urge. I'm on S2, E7. Recently finished Suits. Absolutely loved that show, sad that it's over for me. Tried to watch an episode of the spinoff, Pearson, but didn't finish E1. Slow, imo, and this former NYer (48 years) really doesn't give a rat's ass about Chicago's underworld nor perpetually nefarious politics. [emoji12] But, Suits? Stellar show. Quick pace, fantastic dialogue, smart storylines, unfailingly entertaining. Suits (non-story ruiner nor character exposing) spoiler:
  14. I’ve had a custom Mezz.1 Max since the spring. But back then, our greens were absolutely horrendous (literally, almost lost) due to extensive winterkill. My putting was awful, wasn’t the Max’s fault at all as I just couldn’t adjust to the terrible greens. Before I lost confidence in the putter, with which I had no history, I shelved it for my old reliable 2.1. Putting was still bad on the terrible greens but that putter long earned my trust, a trust that the poor streak at the time couldn’t affect. Long story longer, the greens recovered into the summer, I started putting very well with the 2.1. Got injured in July, came back in early September to freakin’ excellent greens. Putting has been mostly a strength ever since. So… I have this hot streak going. Averaging a score of 75.7 over my previous 20 rounds, barely over 76 for the last 30 rounds. And all with the 2.1. Yet, there is that (crazy expensive, LOL) Mezz.1 Max staring at me from the corner. I know (and it knows, too) that I never did give it a fair chance on really good greens. But then there’s my streak of very good play (for me) to consider, where the 2.1 has taken the ride the entire way. What should I do? Decisions, decisions… Oh, and the Max can’t scoop up balls during practice. Bummer for this bad back golfer. [emoji12]
  15. I play Mizuno irons (JPX-923 Pro) and Callaway wedges (Full-Toe). I switched to the Mizunos due to reviews of their forgiveness, particularly wrt toe contact, my typical miss. I find them to be extremely forgiving in this regard. Due to similar tech claims, I also tried the Mizuno S23 wedges for a while. But I just couldn't dial them in, particularly the shorter, in-between, touch yardages. So, I switched back to the Full-Toes. Besides, I tend to like larger faced wedges and didn't realize, purchased sight-unseen, that the S23's were so much smaller. What would make me switch? For the irons, it would take at least the same forgiveness as the 923 Pros with a similar profile. So to switch, they'd need to be better at something, accuracy, feel, etc. But I won't compromise on forgiveness. The 923 Pros have afforded me such great results off mis-hits that I'd often hardly deserve. Similar for wedges. They have to offer something better with a similar profile. But I do love mine with their Recoil 110 shafts, so it'd be hard to influence change before I wear them out. The S23s were an impulse buy because I'd been so darned impressed with the 923 Pro irons. But truth is, I've loved my Full-Toe wedges, so once I had the notion that the S23s might not work out for me, I looked forward to returning to the Full-Toes. And when I did? Instant improvement in my wedge play.
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