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alfriday101

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Everything posted by alfriday101

  1. Here is a Mike Malaska video that shows the alignment rod set up I use on the range and next to the practice green.
  2. I applaud you, sir. Thank you for thinking of others and doing the prudent thing.
  3. I just got back from my course. I didn’t play, but I used the range and the short game practice area. The club is doing all the things recommend, single riders, raised cups, sanitizing carts, et. al. The members are also taking it very seriously. I spent a couple of hours there and didn’t get near another person.
  4. I use them regularly. For general alignment, you could just as easily use a couple of clubs on the ground. If it’s wet, however, your grips will get damp. I tend to align right of the target if I don’t pay close attention to my set up. This year I practiced with an alignment rod stuck in the ground on my target line about 15 feet in front of the ball and one on the ground about two feet in front of the ball, pointed to the rod stuck in the ground. It has helped me to adjust my perception and to get aligned to the target. The above can also be done green side for chipping and pitching. I also use them to build a “goalpost” for pitching. Stick two rods in the ground about four feet apart and tie a string between them, about three feet high. Practice pitching under the string with a high lofted wedge. It is great for controlling trajectory.
  5. This has been a good thread. Let’s keep it that way. An update on my son and daughter in law. They are very slowly getting better. We text several times a day, when they have the energy. Both say their lung congestion is improving, but they want to sleep and sleep some more. Thank you all for your concern.
  6. Things were a little slow at my course today:
  7. Thanks to all for the kind thoughts and concerns regarding my son and daughter in law. To day, my golf experience really help my non-golf life. I was stressed and definitely living in my head. I took a walk and found I couldn't stop worrying and obsessing. Then it dawned on me that my state wasn't all the different from going into the 17th hole with a career round going. On the course, I (mostly) have learned to focus, get back to process and not to worry about the score on last two holes--to just play the game as it comes. So, I slowed my walk down, concentrated on my breathing, focused on task, recognized intruding thoughts and let them float through. A mile later, I had calmed down and felt much better about life. When I got back to the house, my wife even commented on my mood change. Thanks golf. Hopefully tomorrow I can make it to the course or range for some additional therapy.
  8. All the best to you. Happy birthday.
  9. I found out my son and daughter in law are sick at home with a presumed case of the Coronavirus. Both are 35 and healthy overall. I say presumptive because they can't get tested. They live in Minneapolis and testing is severely limited. My daughter in law was exposed at a conference in Minnesota and had a coworker test positive after being hospitalized. I freaked out when I heard, but calmed down after talking to them. My daughter in law came down with it first and is on the mend. My son is a few days behind, but seems to be recovering. They say it absolutely sucks. My son said he walked down the stairs and felt like he had to take a nap. Luckily, they should recover from it. The best news is that they have been self isolating at home for over a week, so they haven't spread it to anyone else, including our other son who lives a couple of blocks from them. The younger son is on standby to do market runs and to pick up anything they need. They also say their friends are all volunteering to help. I'm in Florida and feel helpless. What if they were in the 10 to 25 percent of young people that require hospitalization? What if they hadn't taken appropriate measured and self isolated? What if they had visited us or their grandparents, or her mother who lives near them and is over 70? It's been a surreal day. I went to the course earlier and practiced the short game and then hit balls. My wife and I walked the dog to the beach. And then we find out about the kids. I don't want to hijack the tread, so I'll say thanks for the concern in advance so we can stay on the topic. Stay safe and flatten the curve.
  10. Yesterday I read and article by a doctor and two sentences from it stood out. He said that hopefully when all this is said and done, we will look back and wonder why took all these steps because it turned out to not be that big of a deal. The irony, he points out, is that it will hopefully not be a big deal because of all we took all these steps.
  11. My wife's grandmother was 10 years old during the global flu pandemic of 1919. She would often talk about it, how she took care of her younger brothers and sister and parents when they got sick. Two of her siblings died. She stayed flu free until all the others recovered and then came down with it. This reminds me of the stories she told. A few years before I was born, polio swept through our area. My brother and sister remember it, my parents were terrified of it. I was born at almost the perfect time to avoid it thanks to vaccinations. Nevertheless, one girl in my grade school developed it and she was in a wheelchair for several years, but recovered. It happened in the summer: swimming pools were closed down, church services canceled, all group activities cancelled. When I was in high school, the flu was particularly bad one year. They didn't close the school, but came very close. I got the flu that year and it sucked. On the bright side, my Biology teacher cancelled the test on zygotes. The local hospital was very busy that year, but because most people took the treat seriously and followed the recommendations of the medical community, it was not overwhelmed. My take on this: we have a responsibility to ourselves, our families, our neighbors and our communities to act in a socially responsible manner. I am taking the recommended steps to avoid exposure, not because I worry about myself. I don't want to get infected and then spread the infection to others, who may be at higher risk. I am doing my part to "flatten the curve." I hope others do so as well.
  12. Develop feel for the club head. Do back and forth (non-stop) practice swings concentrating on the club head. They don't have to be full swings, 9:00 to 3:00 swings work fine. Start with the club square, then turn it in so it is closed, then open it. Each should feel different. Do with your eyes closed to really feel the difference. It shouldn't take too long to be able to feel when you are swinging with the club head closed. Malaska recommends this as a warm up drill for players of all levels.
  13. I got her a set of 4 espresso cups and saucers. Exciting! Right? Back story: About 30 years ago we bought Cafe Richard espresso cups on a trip to Paris. She loved the cups. Over the years we managed to break all of them. The company changed the design of the cups a few years after we got ours and the original design was discontinued so I wasn't able to replace them. My wife did not like the new design. We've looked for replacements every time we've been to Paris. They must have come out with new ones in the original design in the last year and a half. I found them on-line. I don't think she knows the original design is now available.
  14. I"m happy today because I found a great gift for my wife for Christmas. We're at the point in our lives where we don't need anymore "stuff." My wife likes one gift under the tree, but it's always a challenge to come up with something special for her. I think If found the gift for this year.
  15. The state of Iowa is in morning tonight: legendary Coach Haden Fry died today at the age of 90. I was a junior at Iowa when he came to the university. We'd had 17 straight loosing seasons. Three years later, we were in the Rose Bowl. Perhaps his biggest contribution to the game was his coaching tree. Not bad for a boy from Odessa Texas transplanted to the corn fields of Iowa. I think I'll raise a glass to his memory.
  16. When my kids were little, I would wait for the first big snowfall of the winter and drive them out into a small wood on our farm. I would read them "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening." Today I got a text from my 35 year old daughter. She said it was the first big snow at her house in Canada. She asked if I would make a tape of the poem and text it to her. I got the tape made and sent before choking up.
  17. Bandon, especially with the opening of the new course this year. Nebraska golf: Sand Hills, Prairie Club, Iron Horse. Sand Valley.
  18. It's December in Iowa. I played 18 last Wednesday and 18 on Thursday. Stayed inside on Friday because of the weather. Went deer hunting on Saturday, hit some balls on Sunday, and shoveled snow today. Done for the year?
  19. I play with a fairly relaxed group of guys. We will text in the morning to set up a game for the afternoon. If one of the golfers has a conflict, it's not uncommon for them to say "Go ahead and tee off at 2:00, I'll join when I can," or " I have a meeting at 4:30, so I may have to take off early." We can get very serious about our golf, but the main reason we play is for the camaraderie. It's better to play 14 holes than none.
  20. I recommend two books for you to read and study. Note, they are not your typical, technique oriented golf books. First, The Lost Art of Playing Golf. If you take it to heart, it will change the way your approach the game and practice. No more worrying about keeping your left wrist flat, are your pronating or not, etc., but focusing your attention on actually playing better. It also has a section on practice and keeping track of your results. I would recommend this book to golfers at any level. https://www.amazon.com/Lost-Art-Playing-Golf-ebook/dp/B07WF8K43B/ref=sr_1_1?gclid=CjwKCAiA5o3vBRBUEiwA9PVzat3lfbczLg20x8B0arBmbFzytiPwnhzEigS156JmHz3QRup2vZtvihoC-UYQAvD_BwE&hvadid=394318228996&hvdev=c&hvlocphy=9017776&hvnetw=g&hvpos=1t1&hvqmt=e&hvrand=7612051476004675907&hvtargid=aud-840076997981%3Akwd-828733160059&hydadcr=7465_9611852&keywords=the+lost+art+of+playing+golf&qid=1575223693&sr=8-1 Second, GLT Golf Practice--How to Practice Golf and Take Your Range Game to the Course. The book has a good, if somewhat simplified, overview of different types of practice and how each works best for what you are working on. It then has a series of games/drills to work on for game improvement and to track your results.. It has suggestions on how to do the games based on your current level, beginner, intermediate or advanced. It also has suggestions on how to incorporate the drills into circuits (where you move from one drill to the next to the next and then repeat) so as to maximize learning and skill retention. https://www.gltgolfstore.com/p/golf-books/glt-gp001.html The book is a bit expensive, but it was worth it to me. Much of the same information is available on the GLT (Game Like Training) Youtube channel. Personally I like the book as it goes into more depth and provides a better overall framework. Go to their Youtube channel and under "playlists", you can find their golf practice circuits.
  21. Guinness is good for you! https://www.thedailymeal.com/healthy-eating/guinness-healthier-your-light-beer
  22. "Atomic Habits," by James Clear. Subtitled "Tiny Changes, Remarkable Results," and "An easy and Proven Way to Build Good Habits and Break Bad ones." I first became aware of the book "Atomic Habits" through golf websites. It was recommended by a several instructors/writers because of it's application to improvement in golf. (Google "atomic habits golf" to find the different articles.) I then started seeing references to the book on weight loss sites and fitness sites. (Google "atomic habits weight loss", "atomic habits diet", and "atomic habits fitness.") I finally downloaded and read the book. I highly recommend it. It is not a golf book, or diet book or fitness guide. It looks at habits--those things we do during the day without really thinking about them. It helped me recognize all sorts of things I was doing out of habit, what triggered the habitual response and best of all, how to change the bad habit into good. Small changes, but changes that lead to big changes. I recommend the book, for golf and for weight loss.
  23. Agreed. St. Andrews is a wonderful town. Lots of golf in the town or nearby. A great way to do a first trip.
  24. Looks like we were typing at the same time, Dave.
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