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downlowkey

 
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  1. Like
    downlowkey got a reaction from GolfSpy SAM in Ben Hogan's Swing   
    I didn’t know Hogan said that but would have to agree - Mickey Wright’s action was incredible. I read somewhere that early in her development an instructor taught her to hit the ball as far as possible with zero follow through. Presumably that was the foundation of her astonishing lag (reminiscent of Hogan) but she primarily worked the ball right-to-left.
    I also agree that “the sweetest” swing is a very subjective debate but tend to find myself in agreement about swings that fascinated tour players. George Knudson, Adam Scott, Chad Campbell, Boo Weekley, Anthony Kim and Nelly Korda are some that managed to mesmerize their contemporaries.
    Sometimes it’s not an overall swing that takes instruction in a new direction but something unique a player does. Lead wrist flexion in transition is relatively modern idea and most people probably don’t know that Joe Durant is in large part responsible for that widely promoted theory. He went on an absolute heater in the ball striking department for several seasons and people started digging into what he did differently than the rest of the field. But he didn’t have what I would refer to as a classically beautiful swing. I also think that particular idea may have led to better impact stability, rate of closure and dispersion stats but has also resulted in fewer “sweet” swings at the top level of the game.
  2. Like
    downlowkey got a reaction from William P in Ben Hogan's Swing   
    I didn’t know Hogan said that but would have to agree - Mickey Wright’s action was incredible. I read somewhere that early in her development an instructor taught her to hit the ball as far as possible with zero follow through. Presumably that was the foundation of her astonishing lag (reminiscent of Hogan) but she primarily worked the ball right-to-left.
    I also agree that “the sweetest” swing is a very subjective debate but tend to find myself in agreement about swings that fascinated tour players. George Knudson, Adam Scott, Chad Campbell, Boo Weekley, Anthony Kim and Nelly Korda are some that managed to mesmerize their contemporaries.
    Sometimes it’s not an overall swing that takes instruction in a new direction but something unique a player does. Lead wrist flexion in transition is relatively modern idea and most people probably don’t know that Joe Durant is in large part responsible for that widely promoted theory. He went on an absolute heater in the ball striking department for several seasons and people started digging into what he did differently than the rest of the field. But he didn’t have what I would refer to as a classically beautiful swing. I also think that particular idea may have led to better impact stability, rate of closure and dispersion stats but has also resulted in fewer “sweet” swings at the top level of the game.
  3. Like
    downlowkey got a reaction from Rob Person in Ben Hogan's Swing   
    I didn’t know Hogan said that but would have to agree - Mickey Wright’s action was incredible. I read somewhere that early in her development an instructor taught her to hit the ball as far as possible with zero follow through. Presumably that was the foundation of her astonishing lag (reminiscent of Hogan) but she primarily worked the ball right-to-left.
    I also agree that “the sweetest” swing is a very subjective debate but tend to find myself in agreement about swings that fascinated tour players. George Knudson, Adam Scott, Chad Campbell, Boo Weekley, Anthony Kim and Nelly Korda are some that managed to mesmerize their contemporaries.
    Sometimes it’s not an overall swing that takes instruction in a new direction but something unique a player does. Lead wrist flexion in transition is relatively modern idea and most people probably don’t know that Joe Durant is in large part responsible for that widely promoted theory. He went on an absolute heater in the ball striking department for several seasons and people started digging into what he did differently than the rest of the field. But he didn’t have what I would refer to as a classically beautiful swing. I also think that particular idea may have led to better impact stability, rate of closure and dispersion stats but has also resulted in fewer “sweet” swings at the top level of the game.
  4. Like
    downlowkey got a reaction from ILMgolfnut in Ben Hogan's Swing   
    I didn’t know Hogan said that but would have to agree - Mickey Wright’s action was incredible. I read somewhere that early in her development an instructor taught her to hit the ball as far as possible with zero follow through. Presumably that was the foundation of her astonishing lag (reminiscent of Hogan) but she primarily worked the ball right-to-left.
    I also agree that “the sweetest” swing is a very subjective debate but tend to find myself in agreement about swings that fascinated tour players. George Knudson, Adam Scott, Chad Campbell, Boo Weekley, Anthony Kim and Nelly Korda are some that managed to mesmerize their contemporaries.
    Sometimes it’s not an overall swing that takes instruction in a new direction but something unique a player does. Lead wrist flexion in transition is relatively modern idea and most people probably don’t know that Joe Durant is in large part responsible for that widely promoted theory. He went on an absolute heater in the ball striking department for several seasons and people started digging into what he did differently than the rest of the field. But he didn’t have what I would refer to as a classically beautiful swing. I also think that particular idea may have led to better impact stability, rate of closure and dispersion stats but has also resulted in fewer “sweet” swings at the top level of the game.
  5. Like
    downlowkey reacted to cnosil in Ben Hogan's Swing   
    Ben Hogan said Mickey Wright.  
    The bigger question is what criteria are we using to evaluate the swing?   Swings are a little bit unique to each player so experts could probably nit pick them all including Hogan.   Hogan's swing probably isnt a good model for someone that struggles with a slice.  
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