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pilot25

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  1. The SuperStroke Traxion 2.0 with a 50 gram weight is an exact match of the Toulon Odyssey grip weighting of 105 grams. Interestingly enough I have found that the 75 gram insert and an additional 20 grams on the bottom of the sole plate reduces my off center hits by more than 70% easily. My opinion is finding the proper weighted balance for your stroke will make you a better putter. Trying to take a stock putter and throwing a Gravity Grip or other weighted grip on it isn't going to help. I'm guessing Toulon found 105 grams in the grips and 20 extra grams in the sole are the zone for the average golfer. Adjusting both for the individual will pay dividends.
  2. I'm just going to find a 75 gram SS grip and leave the Toulon weight in the shaft. Easy Peasy vs trying to find a new grip with weight to match the Toulon design
  3. I keep answering myself so I'm clearly crazy and taking this too far. On another forum someone replaced their Oversized StrokeLab grip. The weight is 41 grams. It looks like it's probably 40 grams and there is a plastic shroud around it that is probably a gram. The grip itself is 65 grams. Gravity Grip is 123.7 grams. The only SuperStroke grip close is the Mid-Slim 2.0 with a 50 gram weight and grip weighing 64 grams. Also, Sean Toulon has no idea what weight is in the grips of his designed clubs. In that video, he initially says 40 grams then corrects himself to 30 grams. Edit: From another forum pistol grip: 75 gram grip with 30 gram weight Oversized grip: 65 gram grip with 40 gram weight
  4. I keep answering myself so I'm clearly crazy and taking this too far. On another forum someone replaced their Oversized StrokeLab grip. The weight is 41 grams. It looks like it's probably 40 grams and there is a plastic shroud around it that is probably a gram. The grip itself is 65 grams. Gravity Grip is 123.7 grams. The only SuperStroke grip close is the Mid-Slim 2.0 with a 50 gram weight and grip weighing 64 grams. Also, Sean Toulon has no idea what weight is in the grips of his designed clubs. In that video, he initially says 40 grams then corrects himself to 30 grams.
  5. I posted this on the Toulon thread answering my own post in case others are wondering. According to a Callaway/Odyssey rep, the strokelab shaft is meant to pair with the strokelab grip. They have many offerings when ordering but that is to please the masses. If you want the proper weighting that is designed for the putter then you need the strokelab grip with the yellow lettering shown in the pictures from the OP.
  6. I'm going to answer my own question in case anyone else is wondering. Yes, it would be bad on a Toulon putter with StrokeLab shaft. I was told by a Callaway/Odyssey rep that the only grip that is specifically designed for the StrokeLab shaft are the Odyssey Green and Yellow strokelab grips. In order to get a replacement you need to go through a shop. Really annoying......
  7. Sean states they added 30 grams to the butt end of the grip. SS only offers 25, 50, or 75 gram inserts. Gravity grip is 50 gram rod. Hmmmmm....What to do. So what happens if you need to change a worn out grip? This seems implausible that they would design a putter that cannot be re-gripped with the same specs.
  8. Is that the inserted weight? Sorry I'm new to the nomenclature. I think that is the screw in weight and then the total weight of the grip with weight would be about 110 grams. At least, I think it is an educated guess.
  9. I just weighed a Gravity Grip and its 123.7 grams. It has a 50 gram steel rod down the length of it so the grip is 70.7 grams. I imagine this is the exact weight of the SS counter core with the 50 gram insert. I bet a dime to a dollar the Odyssey Toulon or Stroke Lab grips are exactly the same weights. I was hesitant to cut the grip off but the Odyssey garage has the SS grips for an option and I'm sure they are the same exact counter core grips but with special green toulon or yellow stroke lab colors. I have combed all the forums and apparently no one has changed grips on their Toulon/stroke lab putters. Or they haven't cared to worry about the weighting which is integral to the club itself. I can't believe I'm the only one concerned about weighting this thing properly. From globalgolf.com. Its about the Toulon but the shaft, grip and head weights of the strokelab putters are the same. Toulon Putter Models Each model in the line is designed for a specific stroke, from straight-back to strong arcing. In that order (no arc to most arcing), the models are Indianapolis, Memphis, Columbus, Madison, Austin, San Diego, Long Island. Every Toulon putter is also available in a counter-balance model. Further, there are 2 types of counter-balance options, Aggressive Release (AR) and Moderate Release(MR). The AR has a 40-gram sole plate and 14″ Super Stroke grip with a 50-gram butt-end weight. The AR design lets the clubhead release more at impact, mimicking the release of a long or belly putter. It comes standard at 38″ long. The MR has a 20-gram sole plate, standard Super Stroke grip with a 25-gram butt-end weight. It allows you to release the head more with a standard stroke. The lengths available range from 33 inches to 36 inches.
  10. I guess I can cut it off and weigh it then find something of the same weight. Kind of crazy.
  11. Has anyone tried putting on a different grip or is the grip weighted a certain way to balance the club properly? I recently purchased a Toulon putter which has the same shaft that is weighted on both ends. I'm was thinking of putting a gravity grip on it but have a feeling that will make the weighting out of balance. I cannot find the specs of the weight of the grip to replace it with something that shapes my hand better.
  12. Would it be bad to put a gravity grip on a Toulon putter?
  13. I'll revise that post a little. I said I didn't know how my old Bettinardi compared to the new Bettinardi's. That isn't true. I did putt with one in the store. They only had one and I didn't see much of a difference from what I had. I wish I could say what the name of it was but I cannot. I do remember it had blue accents and thought it look pretty cool. So I can't say I was comparing one new putter against another new putter. Maybe indirectly. I would pick up a new one. Hit 5 putts then hit 5 putts with mine. If there was something significant about it I would have put it aside to try some more. The only one of about 15 different ones was the Toulon. I also didn't hit every style of one type. If a certain brand blade was a turn off I didn't try the mallet of the same brand. Not exactly scientific but it works for me.
  14. A reputable shop in the D.C region. I called around to all the fitters I thought would be of a good standard and none of them said they did a putter fitting on a monitor. Within 45 minutes of the center of D.C there are some highly regarded fitters and none has the ability to do a putter fitting on a monitor except Club Champion. I went in there and wasn't thrilled with the reception I got when I wanted to ask some questions about the fitting. Maybe they were having a bad day that day. The other places said they do putter fittings but not with computer aids. Maybe I just wasn't calling the right ones. GD magazine had them all rated in the top 100 at some point in the last 5 years or so. I was pretty surprised considering almost all of them used Trackman for fittings. I have to say the Trackman fitting I did for all the other clubs was amazing and eye opening. I had no idea how much tech is available for the average person. I've seen the pros using it on TV but I didn't realize the average Joe would get anything out of it too. Pretty neat. As far as the Toulon vs the Bettinardi, my Bettinardi is from the companies infancy. They were making putters for the Ben Hogan company at the time. 2002 I think. So I don't know how it compares to the Bettinardi's of today. I still think putters are a very personal choice and if I did get fitted and the data said get X vs the Toulon I probably still would have gotten the Toulon. In my opinion it was that good. But others in the store weren't as enamored with it as I. I'm old school and believe the putter is just too much of a personal preference vs. tech data results.
  15. The back story is I haven't bought any equipment in 10+ years. I also don't follow equipment trends and haven't played in 2 years. I'm not a great player but not horrible either. I decided to play again. After a few trips to the range and few rounds on the course I decided it was time to get new stuff. Went to get fitted for everything last month. I was mostly a blank slate and let the fitter decide what I was going to purchase based on the monitor data. The only stipulation was I wanted to try at least 5 different brands of each type of club. Irons, Drivers, Woods. I say mostly a blank slate because the only thing I assumed was TM was going to be the driver because everyone I saw, at the range or on the course, was using the M5 or M6. The assumption was wrong. I also didn't do a hybrid or putter fitting because I have always loved my old Bettinardi Baby Ben putter and saw no reason to get something new. I hate hybrids but eventually realized my game isn't worthy of a 3 iron. So I went back to get a hybrid fitting. After doing the hybrid fitting I had some time to kill and decided to test this Evenroll putter I've been reading about. I was skeptical because now I'm not a blank slate. After the first fitting, I start reading about equipment. I'm letting buzz about the putter enter my brain. Nevertheless, I picked one up and tested it against my old Baby Ben. I didn't see enough difference to justify a purchase. I tried the Scotty Cameron, which everyone knows about. However, same thing. No difference. I went around to all the different putters that I never heard about and landed on the Toulon about half way through all the choices. Felt different, putted different. About choked when I saw the price tag. Put it down and moved on to try the others. Everything else was no different than my old putter. Went back to the Toulon and hit about 20 putts with it and 20 putts with my old putter and decided it was worth the price tag. I didn't know anything about the shaft weight changes. I just knew it was better than my old putter by a lot. The feel was exceptional and the distance control seemed better for some reason. After deciding to get it the fitter told me about the shaft and the feeling I had in my swing was probably due to the shaft weight being redistributed. Whatever. It feels really good and if it makes playing more pleasurable then I was in. They don't do putter fittings so I was on my own deciding on mallet or blade. Had enough of the mallet look so I was deciding between the Austin or San Diego. Austin was a little too small so went with the San Diego. I expect to play this equipment for the next 5-7 years before I do this all again so in the grand scheme $500 is acceptable for a club that is the most used club in a round. Since I made these purchases I started looking at sites like MGS. Maybe a little post purchase confirmation. I spent a lot of money on new equipment and I guess I would like to make sure what I got is good. Stupid, I know, but I guess its my human nature. Hope that answers your question.
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