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den748

 
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Everything posted by den748

  1. Thank you for this article! This quote explained it all to me and I'm actually embarrassed I didn't do more research on my own (or my own critical thinking). "The USGA's Handicap Research Team tells us that the average player is expected to play to his Course Handicap or better only about 25 percent of the time" So my next question then is...what is everyone's range? Mine is a 78 to 98 in my past 20 rounds. So 20 strokes. I've seen worse for sure.
  2. So I am, at this very moment, a 9.6 handicap but the average of my last 20 rounds is 87.8. Now, I get that the handicap is more a measure of your potential and not your average. I also get that average score is a flawed stat since you need to take difficulty int consideration. So although I'm a 9.6, I usually play closer to a 12. I'm just curious what others see in their scoring trends? Does anyone think there is a better way to do it? <- doubt that but should be an interesting conversation.
  3. den748

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    If they're friends, I want them to play well. I also want them to play poorly so they explode and I can laugh at them and have a good time busting each others chops. If I'm in a tourney, I want them playing poorly. But not so poorly that they become disruptive to my round. Pace of play is more important to me. I'm much more a Brooks than a Bryson. If I play with someone who is slow, I play much worse.
  4. den748

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    Depends how many "serious" rounds I play in. I go against the MyGolfSpy advice of always playing the same ball. My friday night golf league is a 2 person scramble league and I'll play some used E6 Soft balls I buy from LostGolfBalls.com and might go through 18-24 a month. So not super expensive. If I play a round where I'm doing more than just practicing and am trying for a score I'll lose from 1-4 a round. I play ProV1, so 4-6 "real" rounds a month starts to add up. Now that the background is out of the way, I'd say on average through the playing season I'm around $50 a month. Which just got really depressing to think about.
  5. Second the 18 birdies recommendation. I used to use golfLogix and just fell off using it. I have heard "theGrint" is good, but I personally have not tried it, and have no idea who named it cause it sounds like a part of the body. Then if you really want to go to the next level, arccos is pretty awesome. But you'll have to shell out some cash.
  6. Awful word choice by me. Can we say the NEW Bryson break through? I almost feel like he's a new golfer. He should wear a new hat or something.
  7. I could not agree more on pace. It's very Goldilocks for me as well. Too slow and I feel I have to rush to catch up (only to just wait on the next shot), but too fast I feel like I have to keep up. There is a perfect pace somewhere and, as you said, usually happens most often when playing in a foursome.
  8. I have found that work stress and personal stress actually helps me. Takes my mind off of the golf game a bit, but not in a "I have to rush home" kind of way. Like how caddies like to talk about other sports on the walk to the ball off the tee, don't stress about the next shot. Funny story, in high school one of the best rounds I played on my golf team was when my GF was "late". Did not think of my golf swing at all between shots and also was not rushed because I dreaded being home. We played 9 and I think I shot a 37 at Gulph Mills.
  9. As with the last 2 events, I think a lot of eyes will be on the nerd who got tired of being bullied and hit the juice. From my understanding, these fairways are more wide open which could let him really unload more and lead in driving distance. Can he put together everything else and break through? I think the tour LOVES this Bryson story.
  10. I played in a tournament this past weekend and played "okay" through 7 holes before the wheels fell off (double or worse on 9 of last 11 holes). After the round I was thinking through what went wrong. Of course, I thought about what was wrong with my swing but then when talking to my wife she said "well why did you change anything?" which led me to think further. I did not eat a big breakfast, tee time was 12:12 so did not eat lunch at all, and only had a few trail mix packages in my bag. I was STARVING on the course and that was in my head big time. I just wanted the round to end and I started rushing by not sticking to my pre-shot routine, got frustrated with my partners playing slower than me (not slowly, just slower than me). So though my swing sucked, there were some underlying causes to me falling apart. I know how to fix it...just eat more before the round and bring more food on the course. But my question to all of you is..... What, outside of your swing itself, causes the biggest negative (or positive) impact on your round?
  11. Well, I know smokers who lived to 90+....doesn't mean it's what will work for the vast majority of people. Generally when teaching someone new you'd want to focus on works for most people THEN start finding exceptions. If someone who has never seen a golf swing asked you to describe a swing, are you going to describe Matt Wolff or are you going to go with something more like Adam Scott? So I'm not saying you're wrong in saying it isn't a requirement, and I'm not saying I'm right that it HAS to stay "down" but I've never been a fan of trying to use 1% of the 1%-ers as a baseline.
  12. Sometimes I feel like "keep your head still" is a way of saying "keep your eyes on your target". I remember when I learned my dad would say "keep your head still" more as a keep your head down and don't try to follow the ball before it's been hit. I hope that makes sense. I don't know.... as others have said, ask your instructor the reasoning behind it.
  13. den748

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    In order of frequency: 1. Ball on front foot, weight on front foot, wrists locked, hands just ever so slightly in front of ball, narrow stance. Used for 20 yards and in with some green to work with. 60 or 54 degree wedge depending on how much green. Probably 60% of my shots are this 2. Ball on back foot, weight on front foot, wrists locked, hands just ever so slightly in front of ball, narrow stance. 54 degree or my gap wedge. Used for 20 yards and in on fairway with lots of green to work with. Probably 25% 3. regular stance, ball in middle to maybe slightly back, weight on front, hands just in front, adjusting swing based on distance. Used from 30-50 yards out. 60 or 54 degree depending on how I want it to land. 10% of my shots 4. open stance, 60 degree flop shot, lots of wrists. 60 degree wedge. Swing speed depending on distance. Scariest shot on the course for me. 4% of shots. 5. one percenters. Make things up cause of some strange thing having to do with the lie or course. get creative. Turn on cell phone camera.
  14. My biggest concern is when I rent clubs when on a work trip where I can't bring my own. But even with that it only takes a few holes to re-acclimate for the day. I did experience this first hand though last year when I got fitted for the first time and went from R7-Draw (2007) Irons to the p790s (2019). 7 iron went from my 150 club to my 170 club. Took a bit of to adapt. Like age...Iron marking is just a number.
  15. Played in a tourney yesterday.  Played 7 holes "ok" then completely fell apart on the last 11.  Like...double on 9 of the 11.  It was so so so bad.

  16. Mine is moving my hips too fast and then my arms and shoulders have to catch up so I come over the top. Been trying to fix it by slowing my tempo and initiating my downswing with my arms. Maybe more a mental queue than a "correct" one. It's a work in progress.
  17. I find that I get false feedback from hitting off of mats. I usually chunk on the course and if you're just a little fat on a mat it could seemingly be a pretty good shot. Also to @TimoTe point, mats usually don't have a perfectly flat lie and there is almost nothing you can do about it. One more thing I hate about mats, I can NEVER get my tee to the right height. So the swing that should be least impacted (a tee'd up drive) ends up being impacted. I get why they have to have mats, no way any grass would grow at most public courses but it's still frustrating. I'd pay extra for a range with grass.
  18. I would say it is my first ace but not my first hole in one. Based on current rules it's a 1 (so an ace) but it wasn't holed. You'll have a great bar debate for years though!
  19. Adding more here. You are hittting the ball about 50 yards high to their 32 yards. Launch angle of 10 vs. 15+. I know this might sound like I'm ripping your swing apart, and I apologize if it is coming off that way. Just trying to use objective numbers to help figure this out for you. Once you know where the "problem" is, you can start attacking it and correcting it. Best of luck out there, I'd kill for that swing speed!
  20. doing the math on your smash and swing speed give you a ball speed of roughly 160mph...and looking at the trackman chart of average PGA players puts you below them in terms of ball speed (and thus carry). And they also have less spin and I'm sure other better swing stats. The puzzle is coming together! Seems you could benefit from slowing your swing but making better contact (improving ball speed). Gotta love golf!
  21. One other question...how do you know your swing speed? I'm wondering if the 121 is accurate? Not trying to say you're not swinging hard but this could be the simplest answer.
  22. Oh man, this could be any of a number of things... Just cause it says low spin, I'm not sure that means it will definitely be low spin for you and your swing/driver. Could you be hitting with too much loft? Could you be hitting it too far into the upswing? I doubt it would be the ball, but I'm not an expert there either. I know this is a common answer but going to get fitted or at least get on the trackman would be super helpful for you. It would isolate where the problem might lie.
  23. First Name/City State: Dennis/ Chantilly, VA Desired to Test: 460 Swing Speed: Approx. 110
  24. Anything greater than 3-4 feet, I tend to focus on the ball. If it's under about 4 feet (and little break), I'll look at the hole. I just recently made this change and it was VERY uncomfortable at first but after a few rounds and some sessions at the putting green it feels much more natural now and removed nerves from those "gimme" putts.
  25. I think this is a good topic for a new post. I think many, and maybe even most, 15+ handicappers don't realize that there is a limit to each hole score. So they might shoot a 100 but they have 4 quads on their score card or something like that. I was halfway through my season before I learned this and once I accurately started entering my score my handicap dropped 2 strokes very quickly.
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