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Found 105 results

  1. Last August I picked up a new PXG Brandon putter in a black finish and overall I have felt just so-so when putting with it. I am a 1.8 handicap and came from a very old Scotty Cameron Newport 2 that I had liked and been happy with it for many years. I went to PXG for a softer feel off the putter face as well as just a change when I am looking over the putter. After doing some tests with both the PXG and the Scotty Cameron here were my results... Looks: In terms of looks both look relatively the same with the PXG have a slightly shorter hosel than that of the Scotty Cameron. I have enjoyed the PXG's screw design and it adds a nice touch as well as seems to be an interesting weight design that PXG is known for. However, the screws on the top could be a distraction if you are used to a normal style blade putter. However, PXG has removed the screws from the top in their new Brandon Gen 2. Performance from the fringe: After testing both putters from 30 feet off the green I felt like the PXG performed better from the fringe and was much softer at impact whereas the Scotty felt a little bit firmer from this length. Overall both were not uncomfortable to put with. Performance from 5 feet: This is where I started to have an interesting time with the PXG. While putting off the green and not feeling as much of an impact was nice inside 5 feet I had a hard time judging how much speed to give it as the PXG was very soft and almost felt like air when putting at these distances. Downhill puts were very hard as it felt like I wasn't even putting the ball and would blow it by the hole. Price and Value In terms of price I would say $499 for the PXG seems a bit excessive. While I fully understand they are luxury golf company, spending $499 just seems to be a bit much for one club in the bag. However, if you like a softer feel I would completely recommend the PXG. Score (1-10): PXG= 7.5 Scotty Cameron= 8.5 https://www.pxg.com/en-us/clubs/putters/brandon
  2. Call me Taneleer Tivan Before we take a look at the sweet putter that I have for you today, I thought that it would be interesting to explore the question of how does a golfer go from having one putter in his bag to having a hundred putters in his garage? Crazy as that sounds, it is exactly what happened to me, and to more than a few other putter collectors out there. Somehow, we transitioned from needing a putter to play golf with to needing to have lots of putters. How does this transition happen? I'll try answer that from my experiences, perhaps serving as a pathway, or a warning, for other would-be putter collectors. I've Always Collected Stuff I was not really joking when I said that you should call me The Collector (Did you get that reference above?). When I think back on it, I've collected various things my entire life. Baseball cards, comic books, Star Wars action figures, beer coasters, and the list goes on from there. I think that for me, collecting is 20% value speculation, and 80% the hunt. I get a bit of a rush when I find something cool/rare. I remember being super excited to open up a pack of Fleer NBA cards that had a Shaquille O'Neal limited edition Rejector card inside. Was certain that it would be worth a bunch of money eventually, not the 99¢ list price currently all over eBay. The thrill of acquisition definitely outpaced value on that one… So I suppose that I had a predisposition to collecting before I ever started amassing putters. Without getting into my entire golf biography, I started playing “serious” golf late in life (age 39). By “serious” I mean that I took lessons, bought nice equipment, and overall cared more about how I played than I had during my previous drink beer and hit balls golfing escapades. My first real putter was an Odyssey Rossie 2 that I received from my father-in-law as a Christmas gift. That putter probably started the cavalcade of flatsticks. Once I became aware of the vast putter options out there, the constant putter well rotation became inevitable. The Rossie quickly became a Cleveland VP Milled #2, which then became a Scotty Cameron Circa 62 #1, and so on and so on. Lots and lots of putters have moved through my bag through the years. Understatement of the year right there. Moving Off The Rack At some point, I became aware of the custom putter market. I can't remember the exact situation regarding how this happened, maybe it was when I found PutterTalk.com, but it was a mind blowing revelation. It was crazy to think that there were small shops out there making putters that were truly unique, most containing way more personality than those found in the golf shop, and at a price that was not much above off the rack retail pricing. I had to have one. I think that people order custom putters for two reasons. They either have very specific putter specifications that match their putting stroke, or they want a putter that is cool and unique. Sure, you can have both of those, but I can admit that my motivation for acquiring a small shop putter was the latter. I had no real clue about my stroke needs, but I definitely wanted something cool to putt with. Thus began my long-running love affair with the LOL longneck. Byron Morgan 006 LN This Byron Morgan 006 putter that I have to share with you today was my first custom putter. Thing is, I didn't order it directly from Byron, so it wasn't custom to my specs, but as soon as I saw it, I needed to have it. Nothing that I had seen in a shop was even remotely similar. When I think about the attraction, I think that it was the overall character of the putter that drew me in, and what keeps me a fan of small shop putters to this day. The most important thing about a custom putter for me is that you can see that a person made it, putting some of their life into the metal. Maybe that's a bit woo woo for a putter, but whenever I look at one of my Byron Morgan putters, I can envision Byron with a hammer adding the stamps, grinding away at the wheel, or torching the neck to be able to twist it. His hands were all over the making of this putter, and I appreciate that. Not all of the stamps are quite the same depth, and the position of the stamps is definitely organic, compared to a machine-driven engraver where everything is all squared up. You may not find the same variable aesthetics as pleasing, but I definitely value the feeling of connection to the person behind the putter. I gamed this putter for almost a whole year, which some of you may recognize as being a labor worthy of Hercules. I own my putter philandering. Though it's a little heavy for my stroke, I still sneak the LOL LN out to the course here and there. It's just fun to roll balls with, and when I look at all of those smiley faces, how could I get angry about anything that happens on the green. Since acquiring the 006 LOL LN, I've ordered a few custom putters from Byron, and every time that I open up the box and see the putters for the first time I am amazed at what Byron has produced. Sure, I sent him the specs, and maybe some ideas about aesthetics, but Mr. Morgan is the one who breathes life into the metal. As I write all of this, I can feel the urge to order another putter grow stronger and stronger. I know that I now need different putter spec than my previous Byron putters. I've even got a theme in mind. Perhaps it's time to send an email to Huntington Beach... Any other putter collectors want to chime in on how you got started collecting? Here are some bonus shots of the 006 LOL LN
  3. So I recently made a decision to buy a Bradley putter and I have to say that it took me some time to get used to it, but then I started draining putts left and right. This thing has become and will forever be my main gamer. Has anyone else purchased one of these masterpieces and thought the same thing?
  4. First time long time… …and as far as I can tell there has been lots of My Golf Spy Hype about the boutique brand Evnroll, but I'm here to ask the real life buzz questions - Does anyone have any insight on Evnroll Putters? The tech is captivating, I love Guerin Rifes former work, and the look of the midblade ER2 almost requires some time alone..... Anyway, I’m turning to the community for info mostly because I don’t trust/have contempt for Golf Digest and the PGA Tours equipment blogs, so any actual human/user info on this unique brand would be greatly appreciated! Question mostly pertaining to: 1. Does the Sweet Face Technology actually work? 2. Where's the best place to try one out? 3. Where's the best place to buy one? Keep in mind I live in rural Ontario! (Shout out to MGS Canada)
  5. OFFICIAL EVNROLL PUTTER REVIEW Fozcycle Stage One Stage Two Stage Three RevKev Stage One Stage Two Stage Three Hula Rock Stage One Stage Two Stage Three BGoergen Stage One Stage Two Stage Three jlukes Stage One Stage Two Stage Three Carolina Golfer 2 Stage One Stage Two Stage Three Visit Evnrolls website HERE Visit Evnrolls Facebook HERE Visit Evnrolls Twitter HERE Visit Evnrolls Instagram HERE
  6. Don't forget about the good senior players when testing players equipment

  7. For sale is a very nice condition Evnroll er8 putter with factory headcover and ballpark. Putter is 33” and weight is 370. As far as I know other specs are factory standard. Grip is a superstroke slim 3.0. Want to clear $200 after shipping and PayPal. You can check my feedback on the other golf forum (golfwrx) Thanks Putter is sold
  8. For sale is a new in the box "The Palmer Original Putter" which includes the putter which is signed on the grip, the head cover, and the box which are original and in perfect shape. This is the absolute perfect item to be displayed in any man cave. I am asking $1000 OBO. For inquiries please message me on this platform or email me at - nt.dinaso@yahoo.com. Photos (click here) Photos Backup - https://drive.google.com/open?id=1jy01iIRyMcLJ1mc4HaUhQOp4JBEZO9xy
  9. Clearing out some old stuff... Cobra F7 3 Wood - $155 Cobra F6 Baffler 5 Wood - $105 Ping i-Series Anser Putter w/SuperStroke Fatso CB Grip- $55 All clubs are used and do not come with headcovers. Grips on woods are like-new (~5 rounds) Midsize Golf Pride MultiCompund. I do have 1 club wrench to throw in for the first person who purchases one of the woods. If wrench is not available I will set to your desired loft/weight configuration before sending. All prices include shipping.
  10. KUCH! Looks like Matt Kuchar has finally found a way to get it done again. Been quite a drought for one of golf's most consistent players... Anyway, I thought it a fine time to take a look at his armlock putting style and splash a few photos of his Bettinardi. Any of you try the armlock style of putting?
  11. Trigger warning Patriots Fans Woo Hoo football is back baby. No longer will our weekends be spent without watching giant men bash into each other. This is the week that we can all fantasize about our teams winning the Super Bowl. With that, I suppose that it is a fine time to reflect upon last year's winner, the Philadelphia Eagles. I hope that the Eagles fans have enjoyed their time with the trophy. Once again, all teams sit at records of 0-0-0. Bettinardi has given those Eagles one more chance to soar though with the release of their limited run BB1 putter commemorating their Championship season. Tom Brady may not be buying one of these, but if you want one, act fast tomorrow when they go on sale. Bettinardi's Hive releases have been selling out in a hurry these days. SPECS - Bettinardi BB1 Eagles Putter - Soft Carbon Steel - Flymill Face Milling - Plumbers Neck - Single Flange Sightline - Black PVD Finish - 355 grams - 70 degree Lie - 3 degree loft - Lamkin Deep Etched Grip BB1 Philadelphia Eagles Putter Fly, Eagles Fly! Robert J. Bettinardi is proud to showcase his latest creation in partnership with the Super Bowl Champion Philadelphia Eagles. The limited edition BB1 putter, milled from the finest soft carbon steel and given a Fly-mill face milling for a soft and responsive feel, features a durable black finish with key engravings honoring their first ever Super Bowl Championship. Featuring SB LII date and final score on bumpers, Philly pride engraved perfectly in the pocket with ‘Fly Eagles Fly', and World Champions with the Eagles logo on the sole, this putter was milled with the same precision as the ‘Philly Special' that propelled the Eagles to lift the Lombardi trophy. Paired with a premium leather ‘Philly Special' headcover and black Deep Etched Lamkin grip, the limited BB1 Eagles putter will be available in select Philadelphia Bettinardi retailers and specialty accounts. About Bettinardi Founded in 1998, Bettinardi Golf crafts the finest putters and golf equipment in the world. Family owned and operated by Robert J. Bettinardi and Sam Bettinardi, Bettinardi putters have won over 100 worldwide Tour events, and are trusted by many PGA and LPGA Tour Players. Bettinardi Golf is located in Tinley Park, IL, where it's proud to mill each putter in their own state-of-the-art manufacturing facility here in the United States of America.
  12. Trying to figure out if these old Bobby Grace putters have any value. All except one (the black FBX) are unused. Back in the early 1990's I did some advertising work for Bobby Grace when he was in St. Petersburg, Florida. Before he was acquired by Cobra Golf and then MacGregor Golf. These putters are from the early years and all have the original leather headcovers except The Heavyweight Champion head cover is cloth and in the shape of a boxing glove. From left to right: The Heavyweight Champion. I believe VJ Singh used one of these. FBX. I used this putter myself for over 15 years. It's the only used club of the group. The 2200. The same as the version he made for Cobra but without the Cobra logo. The Pip-Squeek with early HSM insert. The Pip-Squeek with a milled face and no insert. The Little Man with HSM insert. The Fat Lady Swings autographed by Nick Price. Early “patent pending” model. Pay Day with HSM insert. The Fat Man with milled face. The Little Lady with milled face. AN-7 with HSM insert AN-7 with milled face and white Nick Price head cover.
  13. I'm going to be taking an extended break from Golf and wanted to move some of my stuff versus letting it collect dust in my garage. Srixon z565 Irons, standard L/L/L, the shaft is Nippon NS Pro 980 GH DST Stiff. I've played maybe 3 rounds with these irons, they're great and look it. $520 shipped! Bettinardi Studio Stock #28 Putter, got this one in a trade. Oversized Bettinardi grip. $210 Cleveland 14 Way Carry/Stand Bag $110. The bag has seen a course maybe 3 times and has mostly sat in the back of my car. Let me know if you need any additional pictures Prices are shipped and through PayPal. Email me alfredo16001@gmail.com
  14. RH 34” T10 Circle T Newport 2 Button Back Putter. Same putter used by Koepka to win his 3 Majors. DM if interested. $2500 cash includes Headcover and shipping!
  15. Dave's Putter Profile: The Miura KM-009 "This classic toe-weighted design proves it is possible to match looks with performance." -Hoyt McGarity, President of Miura Golf. Miura Makes Great Irons (and Putters!) Since I've actually never owned a set of Miura irons (sadness), I'm actually going with a bit of faith on the first part of that title above. However, I've never met a person who has bemoaned anything about Miura irons. OK, so maybe I've heard some grumblings about price, which is why I don't own a set of them, but I have never heard anyone talk trash about the irons themselves. I do have first hand experience with Miura putters though, and to a putter, the build quality has been exceptional. Putters for Miura Golf are not just haphazardly produced to fill that fourteenth spot in the bag. They are a legit Miura product, and they live up to the Miura name. For reference, you can read my takes on the KM-007 and the KM-008 putters by clicking those links. Today, we are going to take a closer look at the newest Miura Golf putter model, the KM-009. "Although putters aren't our core focus, the Miura family has never attached their name to any product that did not live up to their extremely high standards." -Hoyt McGarity, President of Miura Golf. The KM-009 is not a Cameron 009 Let's get the potential elephant out of the way first. Some of you leading the putter-obsessed lifestyle are well aware that Scotty Cameron makes a 009 model as well. The Miura KM-009 is in no way intended to mirror that putter at all. In this case, KM-009 just happens to be the next number in the putter naming sequence. You saw the KM-007 and KM-008 numbers above, right? Though both the Cameron 009 and the Miura KM-009 are heel-toe-weighted blades, when you look at the putters, you'll quickly see that their common ancestor was a while back on the putter tree of life. These are cousins, not twins. With that out of the way, let's explore the looks and play of the KM-009. Looks The KM-009 is a classic in the looks category. I love the lines of this putter at address. Though the topline is rolled, it still has that overall rectangular profile that I like to see behind the ball. The one thing that stands out is the thickness of the topline. Here is a shot next to my Vault Anser 2 so you can see just how much thicker the top of the KM-009 is in comparison. This thicker topline is one of those putter visual elements that some of you will like, and some of you will not like. I had one friend tell me that the thicker top makes it appear closed to him. I don't get that, but the point is that these little visual tweaks will affect each of us a little differently. The white chrome finish is a bright one in full sun, but not to the point of needing to only look at it indirectly like a high polished stainless finish would require. You are not going to get Twilight-vampire sparkle with the sun overhead, but this finish is a bright one for sure. In terms of precision, the milling on this putter is pretty darn spectacular. I know that zero Miura fans are shocked at this, but even so, the tightness of the milling really stands out. I love that they have mixed in a bit of flair on the bottom with the giant logo. Most of the putter is subtle; then the bottom gives you BAM. Love that design element. The milled lines on the back corners are a cool aesthetic touch as well. Performance The KM-009 gave me a bit of a surprise on the course. I anticipated the feel being a bit heavy for my tastes, and it was a bit heavy feeling during the swing. No fault to Muira there, of course. My preferred head weight is around 345g, and the KM-009 weighs in at 360g. The extra weight does make it very stable during the swing, but I just like it a bit lighter. Again, you may go the exact opposite of me on this, preferring the feel of a heavier head. One aspect of play that sent me back to the spec sheet was the firmness of impact. In a blind taste test, I probably would have said that the KM-009 was made of stainless steel. It's not. The KM-009 is made of mild (carbon) steel, but it feels firmer at impact than what I usually associate with carbon steel. It's carbon though. I did the magnet test to be sure... The firmness culprit is likely that thick front section. There is a bunch of mass behind the ball at impact, this likely imparting that thicker/firmer feeling at impact. It's a thunker, not a clicker. The firmness is coming from mass, and not metal. Those of you who have rolled the thick-fronted Kronos Touch would know what to expect from the KM-009. Once you get used to the impact feel, you'll see that the overall feedback is excellent. You can definitely pick up the differences when the ball hits various parts of the face. Just play some dead-off-the-toe putts on those short downhillers, and you will feel how the KM-009 lets you know where the ball hit the face. All in all, the performance and play of the KM-009 is old school. It relies on shape and metal to roll the ball as opposed to modern materials and fancy groove technologies. It is probably not a putter that will make you immediately better on the greens once you roll it. This is more of a long-term relationship putter. You spend time with it, roll balls with it, discover its nuances, and with the investment in discovery, you will likely find that you have developed an effective putting relationship with this finely-crafted flatstick. And the price... Here is where things get crazy. The price on the KM-009 is only $400! Wild stuff there, right? Now before you frugal crusaders attack your keyboards, think about the fact that most premium putters in the market today are above $300, with the new 2018 Scotty Cameron Select line also costing $400. Like it or not, that's what these putters run these days. I actually thought that the KM-009 would cost more. Miura irons are expensive after all, and the KM-008 was priced at $450... The thing is, I have a feeling that this putter will be exactly what some golfers are looking for in a market that has not satisfied their needs. Some putterheads are not happy that the last few lines of Camerons have had the face insert, as opposed to being fully milled. The KM-009 is forged mild steel, through and through. Nothing but milled metal here. Milled putter purists should welcome this one with open arms. Miura Golf is known for making some of the finest forged irons in golf. Why would their putters be any different? Hopefully you have a Miura dealer near you so you can check out the Miura KM-009 first hand. If you've never rolled one of their putters before, you are in for a treat.
  16. Dude, that putter is trippin' me out... Check out the new limited edition putter from Bettinardi, the Summer Lovin' BB1F. I'll get you some more info on this later today, but the main thing that you need to know is that it goes on sale this week at the Bettinardi Hive. If you didn't get a chance to attend the Bettinardi Summer Social, at least you can score this sweet looking summer-themed stick with the tie dye head cover. DESCRIPTION Introducing our all NEW BB1 Flow Summer Lovin' putter! The new creation by RJB is milled from 303 Stainless Steel, and debuts our first-ever stainless steel Tie-Dye PVD pocket insert that is exceptionally unique to every piece. RJB modified this BB1 with a flat topline and round neck straight from Tour feedback, and made sure to engrave positive Bettinardi vibes all around the putter. Paired with a white leather headcover with a matching peace sign hand, and intricate rainbow stitching that separates the leather from the Tie-Dye felt unique to each cover and an orange Lamkin Deep-Etched grip. SPECS Model: Summer Lovin' Limited Run Putter Dexterity: Right Handed Weight: 358 Material: 303 Stainless Steel Insert: 303 Stainless Steel Tie-Dye PVD Finish: Tour Blast Face Milling: Micro-Honeycomb Loft: 3° Lie: 70° Toe Hang: 3/4 Grip: Orange Lamkin Price: $750
  17. Bettinardi's Summer Social 2018 Bettinardi held their annual Summer Social this past weekend and although I was not lucky enough to attend, they did send me a batch of photos to share with all of you. Looks like an amazing weekend of Bettinardi gear and golf. One of these years I need to make it to the Social, with pockets full of putter cash, naturally. Which one is your favorite? Info about the Social from Bettinardi: The 9th Annual Bettinardi Summer Social, hosted by Bob and Sam Bettinardi and team at our Headquarters in Tinley Park, IL was concluded and we could not be happier to host such a wonderful group for a truly amazing weekend. Over 100 stunning, custom one-of-a-kind and never before seen putters, accessories and Bettinardi golf gear were released for our top customers who traveled from around the globe to attend the fun filled weekend. Following the Friday Social kick-off, many took to the links to play golf on Saturday at the beautiful Crystal Tree Golf Club in Orland Park, IL. Over 8 groups, many with brand new Betti gamers, tour bags, and all sorts of new accessories for the greens battled it out for closest to the pin, longest drive, and of course, the longest putt, with the winner Jimmy Luck taking home the major prize, a DASS BBZero Tour Dept. gold PVD putter. Bob and Sam Bettinardi are truly honored and humbled to have spent the action packed weekend with such great customers and now friends. We are blessed to have such an amazing and loyal customer base. The best in golf! The image gallery below is just a snapshot of great memories from the weekend. Enjoy the pictures and please share your favorite memories via Betti Talks Facebook page and be sure to join the conversation on BB Colony, a third party forum covering all things Bettinardi Golf.
  18. I'm going to be taking an extended break from Golf and wanted to move some of my stuff versus letting it collect dust in my garage. Srixon z565 Irons, standard L/L/L, the shaft is Nippon NS Pro 980 GH DST Stiff. I've played maybe 3 rounds with these irons, they're great and look it. $550 shipped! Bettinardi Studio Stock #28 Putter, got this one in a trade. Oversized Bettinardi grip. $210 Cleveland 14 Way Carry/Stand Bag $110. The bag has seen a course maybe 3 times and has mostly sat in the back of my car. Let me know if you need any additional pictures Prices are shipped and through PayPal. Email me alfredo16001@gmail.com
  19. Hey guys. I am wondering what the process you use to get out the nicks and dents and scratches in golf clubs you work on? If using a bench grinder, what wheels/compounds do you use and in what order if using several? Thanks!
  20. Dave's Putter Profile: Odyssey's EXO Indianapolis S New Gamer Alert! That's right, today's featured putter, the Odyssey EXO Indianapolis Sis the new gamer. Dave switched his gamer? That never happens. How does something as common as rainbows with colors warrant an “Alert”? While I am in fact gaming the EXO Indianapolis S, the “Alert” in that title was not referencing me, but rather Odyssey head design honcho Luke Williams. He has switched to the Indy S. It wasn't too long ago when Luke, Hashtag Chad, others, and myself were all founding members of Team Red Marxman S. it was a big red Marxman love fest. (You can find out more about the O-Works Red Marxman S HERE.) Anyway, as I was chatting with Luke about the upcoming EXO line release, he dropped the bomb that he had switched to the EXO Indianapolis S. And just like that, the Marxman was relegated to the garage, and my excitement to roll the new incarnation of the Indy went pedal to the metal. Luke has access to lots of putters, and he can even make custom ones should he choose, and this putter replaced his gamer. I'd say that warrants a closer look. EXO Line Features Review It was back in January when I was able to share with you the details about the new Odyssey EXO line. You can check out that whole blog article HERE. For those of you who choose not to click the information-refreshing link above, I'll give you the quick version. The new EXO line features three (six) models, a new insert, and multi-material construction that allowed Odyssey to push the MOI numbers beyond normal values. To quote myself: With the EXO line, Odyssey has constructed putters that feature a lighter weight center portion made from aluminum, with the outer part of the putter being made from heavier steel. Physics says, if you move the mass from the middle to the edges, you increase MOI, thus improving rotational stability. Mixing the two types of metals in the head allowed Odyssey to reposition the weight. Additionally, the EXO putters feature shallower centers of gravity than non-EXO models, which should add to their forgiveness. Damn, That Hinge is White Hot The White Hot Microhinge insert is new to the EXO line, and it is much more than an O-Works insert painted white. Without getting too far into the insert rabbit hole again, and because you have all read the First Look article (right?), let's just say that it took some tweaking to get the sound and feel just right. And what “just right” really means is that the insert feels and sounds like the revered White Hot insert, while providing the improved roll of the microhinge technology. When all things were said and done, Odyssey had developed an insert with the sound and feel profile of the beloved White Hot insert, and the roll enhancing microhinge technology. Now that I've had some rounds with the insert, and with the O-Works microhinge insert, I can definitely attest to their differences. Though both provide solid rolls, sound and feel are not the same. I find the White Hot microhinge to feel and sound much softer. It's so soft that I am sometimes surprised that the ball rolls all the way to the hole. Perhaps the feel issue is just an issue of familiarity. During their heyday, I did not extensively game a White Hot putter, preferring milled metal faces. I'd love one of you with more White Hot mileage to chime in on the feel comparison. It does feel softer, yet roll more proficiently when I compare it to my beloved White Ice Sabertooth, but that insert was not quite a White Hot. The EXO vs. Toulon Indianapolis The EXO Indianapolis is the second incarnation of the Indianapolis, with the first one coming under Odyssey's Toulon Design brand. I spent a good deal of time with the Toulon Indianapolis about this time last year (article HERE). Naturally, one will want to compare the two models, and he or she will quickly find that they are actually quite different. Construction One of the things that you can see right away when you compare the two models is that the materials have changed. Both are multi-material designs, but the EXO Indianapolis doesn't feature some of the fancier, and more expensive materials, like carbon fiber and tungsten. While I was initially a bit disappointed that the carbon fiber was gone, I actually think that I prefer the simpler look at address without it. I also think that not including these materials in the EXO version allowed this Indy to hit the $299 price point as opposed to the $399 price for the Toulon version. You can also see some design differences when you closely compare the two models. Take a look at these side shots. The Toulon Indianapolis is mostly hollow, while the EXO version has some structural pillars at its core. If memory serves me, these elements in the EXO Indy were included in the design to control sound and feel at impact. Regardless, it's little design tweaks like this that let consumers know that this is not just a cheaper version of the Toulon model. The Odyssey crew put some thought, and innovation into the EXO Indy. Looks I sort of mentioned this above, but I think that the new looks are a huge improvement at address. I just couldn't get comfortable with the half black and half (really) shiny silver looks of the Toulon Indianapolis. As good as it felt, it was demoted from the bag to the garage. The all-dark EXO looks great to my eye. You get the big sight line, and that's about it at address. I prefer this simple look to that of the Toulon Indy, and even to the O-Works Red Marxman S that I was gaming. It just simplifies aiming for me, and as I have mentioned in the past, I putt better with more squared putters. Slant Neck Option Odyssey is all in on offering slant neck variants of their mallets this year. All of the O-Works mallets can be had with a slant neck, and the same is true for the EXO putters. The Indianapolis, Seven, and Rossie all come in slant or traditional necks models. But why does this matter? Perhaps you happened upon the Most Wanted Monday video below about putter fitting. Adding the slant neck changes the playability of the putter, making a more traditionally straight-back-straight through mallet play more like an arcing blade. The significance of this is twofold. First, it allows slight-arc blade players to try out higher MOI mallets. Adding a slant neck makes the mallet feel more blade-like as it arcs through the stroke. Otherwise you'll be fighting the straight mallet with your arcing stroke. The second thing that builds from that idea, and also from the data in the video, is that not very many players actually have straight strokes. Some will argue that nobody has a straight back and straight through stroke. This means that nearly everyone playing a mallet is playing a putter that doesn't fit his or her stroke. The sad irony for many is that they pick up a mallet in the shop thinking that it is an easier to use putter, and then the resulting mismatch with their stroke costs them putts on the course. PING has addressed this idea for a few years with their different shaft options for their mallets, and now Odyssey has done the same with the S neck. Now you can choose a mallet that actually matches your stroke, and shouldmake putting easier. We still have to roll the putts correctly, of course. Gaming the Indy So like Luke, I am indeed gaming the Indy as well these days. I've mentioned some of the “Whys” already, but really the bag-ability of the EXO Indianapolis Scomes down to a couple of things. First of all, I really feel like I can aim this putter. Obviously, putts hit the hole more often when you can actually aim them at the target. While the Marxman S was quite easy to aim from distance, I struggled in close. Something about the head was distracting, and caused me to lose confidence. Nothing like preferring the 15' putt to the 5' putt. I believe that it's the square shape of the Indianapolis that better suits my eye, and meshes better with my aiming perceptions. Going the Distance The other thing that earns the Indy a bag spot is its distance control. My miss is traditionally short, but the bent-strong loft and the White Hot microhinge insert seem to be doing their distance-controlling job. Though the insert seems a bit soft, it does a great job of getting the ball to the hole. What I mean is that the swing that I take to get a ball a certain distance, gets the ball that distance, even if the feedback makes me think that it was too soft to get there. I am thinking that I will either get used to the soft feel, or this could end up being a to-the-bench issue for the Indianapolis. My feel-to-roll disconnect a bit disconcerting, but if the ball is getting there, I'm cool with the discord. It would be worse if I felt like I hit it well and it ended ten feet short or long. As of now though, it looks like the EXO Indianapolis S will be one of the putters that I'll be taking to Bandon Dunes in a few weeks. Yes, one of the putters. One has to have options for the Punchbowl after all. You can find out more about the Indianapolis, and the rest of the EXO line at the Odyssey site HERE.
  21. I recently went to the local DI (a thrift store we have here in the West) and found some great clubs. My set is pretty complete, but I added them to a set I have for people to borrow and things like that. For about 25 bucks I got: A Taylormade RocketBallz Hybrid 3 - $5.00 A Taylormade R7 3 wood - $5.00 A ping Craz-e putter - $5.00 A Taylormade Rossa Mezza putter - $3.00 It was rare, because usually I just find random irons from the 70's and obsolete woods. I keep checking though because sometimes I find a unique putter or something. Anyway, I'm curious. What's the best thing you have found at a thrift store or garage sale and how much did you pay?
  22. A few months ago my father-in-law and I attended the New Jersey Golf Show - the annual golf bargain hunter's dream. We ran across an up-start team socializing a new putter brand which has taken off in Korea. Top Spin Golf - http://www.golftopspin.com/ We were both a little surprised by the feel and roll these putters put on the ball. Has anyone else seen these and tried them? Anyone gaming one?
  23. I'm A Sucker For… For me, that statement finishes with longneck blades. I don't think that there is another putter that I pine for more for than the longneck. I've got a couple of sweet ones in the never part with section of my collection. One is an old Cameron Tel3 longneck Newport, and my copper twisty Byron longneck 006 may be the pinnacle of my putter collection, and probably going into the box with me when I take the old dirt nap. There was a span of time when discovering a new longneck resulted in an auto-purchase. These putters were the gamer of choice. Only the longneck could give me the face-balanced, non-malletness that I was looking for in a putter. Dave's putter corral was home to double-digit longnecks there for a while. #longneckissues And so, when I saw that Kronos Golf was rolling out the ample-necked Release blade, I knew that it was a putter that needed my close scrutiny. Spending Time with Kronos Many of us first learned about Kronos Golf on the TV show Shark Tank. Kronos' founder and designer delivered one of the most memorable, and emotional pitches in the history of that show. That episode got the Kronos Golf out there, and they have continued to put out some pretty solid video content. Here is a YouTube clip with a little more about the philosophy of Kronos. https://youtu.be/feX4U8VuhJo I first rolled Kronos putters back in 2015 when the Mandala and the Touch were entered in the Most Wanted Mallet and Blade competitions, respectively. The Mandala did great, placing fifth overall that year. That's including blades and mallets. Not too shabby for a small shop. Though the Touch didn't fare as well with the testers, I personally liked the thicker top line and overall blocky blade appearance quite a bit. That Touch found its way into my bag more than once after the testing was completed. Though ultimately a bit too heavy for me, rolling the Touch was a pleasurable putting experience. The Kronos Release https://youtu.be/8H2SwutHphk So let's take a closer look at the new Kronos Release. Obviously, the thing that is going to jump out at you with the release is the length of the neck. As necks go, the Release's neck is quite long. I've seen longer, but this one will stretch right up there with the other giraffes of the putter world. The effect of that neck comes primarily with toe hang, and with that the putter's playability. An Anser-style putter featuring a more traditional neck length fits a slight-arc stroke path, with the neck and head weighting matching the swinging and head rotation of that arcing path. By lengthening the neck, you push the toe hang toward being face-balanced, with the putter now playing more along a straight back-straight through path. What this means that the blade now plays more like a mallet, at least in terms of path. The huge mallets will still have significant MOI differences when compared to a blade, but having a blade that swings like a mallet hits the sweet spot for minimal arc players who don't like the look of huge putters. Face-balanced blades are amazing compromises for the big mallet-phobics. Specifications: Kronos Release 1-piece billet milled 11L17 carbon steel Physical Vapor Deposition finish 2.5 degrees loft, 70 degrees lie, 2 degrees draft 3:30 o'clock toe hang (nearly face balanced) Compass Scored™ face 370 grams Standard with stepless steel shaft, leather cover and Iomic midsize grip Putter head milled and club assembled in San Diego, California. Looks: Kronos Release The PVD finish on the Release is outstanding. That's a subjective assessment, of course, but I love the way that other colors show up in the nooks and crannies of the putter. Nothing so overt that it distracts you at address, rather there are just little winks of color that you catch as you rotate the head. It's a top notch looking putter, and that PVD finish will protect the carbon steel nicely. You've likely noticed that someone's name is on the putter's neck. Spoiler alert, that's my name! I didn't even know that Kronos was offering this type of customization, so I was quite surprised to see this touch of personalization when I opened the box. This is a what that you could make this already unique putter even more custom and spepersonal. These putters could be used to mark births of kids, or other significant events like weddings. Imagine how excited your groomsmen would be this summer if you presented them with putters with something cool like Fairways and Greens on the neck. They'd be bros for life after that. It's a nice option for those interested. Feel, Alignment, and Play Notes: Kronos Release The Kronos Release plays exactly like a carbon steel longneck blade should play. The feeling at impact is deliciously soft, and paired with a pleasantly resonating tone. It gets an ooooh that's nice response when rolled. The Release does remind me of the Touch in many ways. I like the familiar, blockier appearance of the blade at address. For me, the more square the better when it comes to aiming the putter. Once you start rounding edges, my eye gets a little wandering. The blocky top line and simple sight line are well paired for my eye. Not very overt, but enough to be helpful. The Release feels best along a shallow swing path with limited head rotation, exactly like you'd expect. Unfortunately for me, this no longer reflects my current swing description. This past weekend, I spent a few hours with a putting coach and the Capto putting system. During the past year or so, it seemed like I was putting better with deep toe hang putters, directly contrasting what I thought that I knew about my putting preferences. I guess that I could have seen this coming as I have almost unconsciously migrated from long necks to standard necks, and then to flow necks over the past few years. Maybe the transition was a frog in a slowly warming pot thing, where I just didn't really know it was happening while it was happening. The Kronos Release still fits my slight arc path, but the capto sensor showed dramatically different result when we looked at face rotation. As it turns out, I rotate the head much more in my swing than I thought I did. Good or bad, this is my (new?) natural motion, and it's more suited to a flow neck than a long neck. Based on the data, it looked like I was fighting to release the Release a bit. This was a huge surprise, going against my years-long love affair with longneck putters. How can something I love not be good for me (re. beer)? Of course, I'll likely still game it here and there, when curiosity and emotion overpower data at gamer selection time. We all know that just sticking to that one putter would be boring anyway. Will 2018 Be the Time For KRONOS? It seems like Kronos golf may be one to watch in 2018. There are lots of shops out there making milled putters these days. Let's face it, not all of them are innovative, or even interesting. Kronos seems committed on both of those accounts. The Release is deliciously atypical in today's putter corral. I can only think of a few available longneck blades out there that don't require custom production to acquire. Sure, I probably need to go short flow neck these days to hit the hole, but I like to think of myself as a longneck aficionado. The Kronos Release is a solid longneck offering. Did you see a putter on that blog page that you'd like to know more about? Any specific idea that jumped out? Anyone else out there a longneck lover? Fire off that 2¢ MGS folk!
  24. Well hello there MGS readers. Today, you are reading the first installment of a new putter series that I will be putting together for your reading pleasure. Welcome to Dave's Putter Profiles Rather than look at all putters head to head, like MGS does with the Most Wanted Putter testing, Dave's Putter Profiles will focus on single models, exploring the features of that individual model, and taking some time to show what separates it from the others in the corral. While the mission of mygolfspy is to be unfalteringly #datacratic, these articles will be much more editorial, and ideally conversational. I'm going to let you know my thoughts on a variety of putters, both new and vintage models, and then you tell me your thoughts, and then we see where it goes from there. I've run quite a number of putters though my garage over the years, and I want to share some of the flatstick goodness with you. Imagine that we are having a conversation on the practice green, perhaps with a nice adult beverage in hand. That's the spirit of Dave's Putter Profiles. We just look at a putter and have a nice chat. For the first installment, we are going to go with a newer model from Odyssey, admittedly one that I was shocked that I actually wanted to even look at let alone game. I Hate(ed) The Odyssey Marxman How's that for a segue into talking about a putter that I actually like? Perhaps it is not the best way to set the mood, I know, but that was pretty close to my actual thought when I visited Odyssey HQ last January and learned that a Marxman would be part of the 2018 O-Works line. For some reason, my love of all putters has never extended to the Marxman. I think that the disdain actually dates back to the Backstryke Marxman, with the two creative spellings not compensating for the fact that the shaft attached at the rear of the putter. Sure, one of you right now is thinking of telling me how awesome backstryke putters are, and feel free to do so. I'm just not down. We all have our turn-ons and turn-offs. Think about porn for a moment. Let's face it, we all have tags on Pornhub that we prefer, and others that we will never, ever, click on. If backstryke is your kink, good for you. I'll spend my three minutes elsewhere. Anyway, sorry for the detour into porn to make a point, but in that January meeting, I'd have sworn that I'd not be clicking any two girls one Marxman links any time soon. But then I got a look at the red Marxman S. Well Hello There This time, I found the Marxman aesthetics quite pleasing. The massive double sight line had been reduced to a single, and the addition of the slant neck fits right into my current more-toe-hang-is-better putting philosophy. Plus, the new body architecture reminded me of one of my old Odyssey favorites, the Sabertooth. I've got a super cool one of those to share in the coming weeks… Standing over this Marxman evoked feelings of reverence, rather than revulsion. Right away this putter went from never touch to must have. Considering that there was also a trouser-tightening #1 wide with a slant neck in the release, placing the Marxman at the top of my need to have list was surprising for sure. SAM Says One of the cool things that happened during the Odyssey visit was that I got to go through a SAM lab fitting with Odyssey's putter pro. I was pleasantly surprised to see consistent numbers from stroke to stroke, with lots of center face contact, and just a bit of that drifting-outside backstroke that I have long fought to avoid. Turned out that I add loft at impact, resulting in a launch angle that was a bit high. Glad to know that I do this with my putter as well as my irons… This though could be the reason why my typical miss is short. I hit the right line, but I just don't get the ball to the hole. The fitter recommended that I get a Marxman built with 1° loft, so that when I add loft with the swing, the dynamic loft produces better launch conditions. Cool, huh? Gaming the Odyssey O-Works Red S Marxman I've had the Marxman in the bag for about a five rounds now. Some of the play experiences have been as expected, and some surprising. The S Neck Slant neck mallets are a big thing this year at Odyssey. In addition to choosing between black and red, you can also decide if you want your mallet with a traditional neck, or a slant. The beauty of choosing a slant neck is that it will allow blade players to transition to playing a more forgiving, at least in terms of MOI, larger mallet. The slant neck makes the putter arc a little more during the stroke, conforming more to the blade path than normal mallet. I loved the feel of putting with this back in Carlsbad, and that feeling has continued as I putt back at home. I've swapped back and forth with traditional necked mallets in my collection, and the slant neck does make a huge comfort difference for me. 1° of Loft So am I still missing short? Yep, but not as often. My distance control has actually been pretty astounding with the Marxian S considering how few hours on the grass with it I've logged so far. Rarely am I super duper maybe I need steroids short anymore. The data set is totally subjective, but the number of holes threatened score has definitely gone up. More up should translate to more in if the opposite of the never up, never in adage is true. The low-lofted face does not look strange to me at address either. That, or I've just adjusted to it quickly. The putter seems to sit naturally behind the ball, and I don't think that I'm adding loft during the putting process to compensate. At least no more than I add naturally. I think that the strong loft theme will be one that I will continue to explore as other putters hit the bag this season. Interesting side note about the insert. As one who plays almost exclusively milled putters, I expected there to be some transition to the microhinge insert, both in sound and feel. Simply put, there was no transition required. At least on the Marxman, Odyssey has nailed the feel and tone, making the milled to insert transition a non-factor. Aiming the Marxman As I said, I've only been gaming the Marxman for a short time now, but one area of concern is alignment. I'm getting most putts near the hole, but I'm just not quite confident that I am aiming the big white line correctly. This I think will improve with practice, but I have a bit of a concern that this will prove Ketsch-like for me. That's right, I think that I am the one person who struggles to aim the Ketsch. Back when I ran the Most Wanted Mallet test where the Ketsch smashed face on the competition, I tried over and over to make peace with the Most Wanted monster. I came to the conclusion that the line and my eye were incompatible. Perhaps the big line on the Marxman will twist my perception the same way, or as I said, maybe it's just a matter of practice. I do know that I've already made some big putts with the Marxman, both at home, and in Carlsbad. During my visit, the Odyssey guys took me out for a round of golf at their home course. My game tends to go into hiding a bit when I play a course for the first time, and you can imagine the pressure of playing with Sean and Tony Toulon, Luke Williams, and Austie Rollinson. They were wonderful hosts, and not high pressure guys on the course, but as “a putter guy”, I wanted to sink some putts. Thankfully, I was able to drop some decently long putts with the Marxman that day. Austie dropped some bombs with the EXO #7, but I felt that my performance with the Marxman S was respectable. If that's not putting under pressure, then I've never experienced pressure. In a sentence: Odyssey O-Works Red Marxman S Combining the feel of a blade and the forgiveness of a mallet, the Marxman S should definitely be on your roll at the shop list. What do you think? So first of all, thank you for reading the first instalment of Dave's Putter Profile. I've got a number of putters lined up in the queue for the coming weeks, as I said, both putters you can find in the shops, and unique whips found only in my garage. If you would like me to clarify or expand on anything, just ask. I'm just here to start the conversation, where it goes from here is up to all of you.
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