Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
BestGrips.com

Adams 9031 Hybrid 16* for sale or trade!

Recommended Posts

All that is left is the deadly 9031 Hybrid. Great club, I just can't stand the white paint.
 

This is an Adams Super 903116* Hyrbid. The grip is an unmet released Gridiron in the color "Assault" (designed to mimic spec ops camo). The shaft is a AXE Hyb, but I can get the kuro kage that came in it off the tour van installed in it. This is off the Adams Tour Van, as well. ($125, now $100) Played a few rounds. Stock headcover.
 
10638704075_df23ef19f0.jpg
 

10638709955_88c85c78f6.jpg
 

10638735026_03fcbb509c.jpg
 

10638969783_fc3c71197d.jpg
 

10638734445_30485ce1e2.jpg
 

10638985003_0ae79060f7.jpg

 

As always, make an offer! 

 

Also,

 

What I'm looking for....

 

9.5 or 8.5 G25 Driver

15 or 17 X Hot Pro Fairway

 

Pm me here, or email zsewill@gmail.com!

 

These Scratch irons have a bit of a story. They are the precursor to the Ar1. I used these for about a half a season as well. They have wrapped leather grips and have True Temper Dynamic Gold SL stiff shafts. This set is 5-Pw. SOLD ($400).
 
This is an Adams Super LS 10.5* Driver. The grip is a Gridiron Club Grip. The shaft is TS AXE 7+. This is off the Adams Tour Van. (SOLD) Played for a few months. The headcover is a Drivershoe (British Open 2013)
 
This is an Adams Super LS 13* Fw. The grip is a Yellow Gridiron Club Grip. The shaft is a TS AXE 7+. This is off the Adams Tour Van. (SOLD) Played for a couple months. Stock headcover.

 

The Miura irons are the Retro Tournament Blade (3-PW) with spined, flowed, and frequency matched rifle 5.5 shafts. They have a brand new set of Gridiron Club Grips.

 

I used these for about a half a season SOLD ($500, now $400). 
 
10638567756_4b244dff1c.jpg
 
10638555384_cfdbf60db6.jpg
 
10638799263_10cc51d2d0.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Miura Irons are joined by the hybrid! Price drop to $400 (includes domestic shipping) for the irons and $100 for the Hybrid!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Scratch irons = sold!

 

Miura is the only stuff left. Interested in a trade?

I already know your answer, but I've got some Wilson Staff Fi5s with your name on 'em!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I already know your answer, but I've got some Wilson Staff Fi5s with your name on 'em!

Those are some sweet irons! Unfortunately, I just got a set of pings, and am out of the iron accumulating business. Maybe we can work a 3 man trade with RP and his G25 driver. Wasn't he interested in the Wilsons awhile ago?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Those are some sweet irons! Unfortunately, I just got a set of pings, and am out of the iron accumulating business. Maybe we can work a 3 man trade with RP and his G25 driver. Wasn't he interested in the Wilsons awhile ago?

 

He was, though the grooves are non-conforming... As far as I have been able to surmise.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

  • Daily Deals

  • Sponsors

  • Our Sponsors

     
     
     

  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      80,392
    • Most Online
      2,247

    Newest Member
    Condor
    Joined
  • Similar Content

    • By billymo
      Adams Blue 2015, 5 Wood at 16*, Excellent Condition with Adams Headcover. Was new 2 months ago, hit maybe 12 times. Extremely extremely forgiving, high ball flight, fun to hit. Not looking to make money, just to sell it. A bargain only $40 plus $10 shipping.423-588-9592 or billymox2@gmail.com
    • By flatlandsanta
      My Original Jones Black Bag holds:
       
      Driver: Titleist 910 D3 8.5° 70g Aldila RIP Stiff
      3 Wood: Titleist 917 F3 15° 75g Aldila Rogue MAX Stiff
      Hybrid: Titleist 818 H1 19° 70g Mitsubishi TENSEI Stiff
      3 – PW: Miura Forged Retro Blades NS Pro 1050 X-Stiff
      Gap: Cleveland RTX-3 V-MG 52°/10 TT Dynamic Gold X-100
      Sand: Cleveland RTX-3 V-LG 56°/8 TT Dynamic Gold X-100
      Lob: Cleveland RTX-3 V-LG 60°/6 TT Dynamic Gold X-100
      Putter: Scotty Cameron Studio Select Newport 2
      Ball: Titleist Pro V1
       
      ​Time for a new Driver, hit 10 balls today with the TS3 and it is hot!
      ​Irons to follow, debating a progressive set
       
      ​Santa
       
       
    • By flatlandsanta
      I'm a born and bred Canadian in my 40's, who fell back in love with the game after a 2016 trip to Scotland.  This second chapter to my golf career continues to pick up speed, and this site looks like a great forum to stay informed of trends, product and opportunities that admittedly I stopped paying attention to a long time ago.

      The first chapter is a long story, starting at age 5 when my parents took up the game – I started with them, cut down adult clubs and all.  I was more interested raking the sand greens at our first 9-hole course than I was trying to get the ball in the air.  Names like Indian Hill, Bridge Valley, Henderson Lake, Picture Butte and Land-O-Lakes were where I learned to play the game.

      By the time I was 11, I beat my father and shot in the 80's.  By 13, he never beat me again.  Not bad for a game that we only played 6 months of the year, but with all the other sports that I played competitively, this was just another outlet where so many of the same fundamentals applied.  Competition breeds results.  Even when we traveled, the clubs were in tow.  More sand greens in Ituna, the links of Melville and Yorkton, Fort Qu'Appelle, Milk River and Meadow Lake.  It was only after playing in Scotland that I realised just how much my wind swept summers on sun baked prairie golf courses so closely mirrored links golf.

      My parents were supportive, so I competed in numerous tournaments, and played countless games as a teenage member against much older, and better players.  More than once I played for (and occasionally lost) money that I did not have.  By 16 I was a scratch golfer, but it was not until I was 19 and now playing university golf that I had my first golf lesson.  Flaws in my swing managed to get me that far, but they did not lead by any means to a memorable resume by the time I got my degree, but my game was more than capable enough of qualifying for the CPGA.

      Public golf courses are not the ideal place to improve one's game, not when the priorities are selling green fees and teaching lessons to make a living.  Golf and I were at a crossroads at this time, though only in hindsight did I fully appreciate that.  60 hour work weeks during the summer months meant that golf that was played when there was time, not as a priority.  That life wasn't for me, and by 30 I was out of the golf business.

      My new career became (and remains to this day) a busy one.  I had many years where 15-20 rounds of golf was all I would play.  I played more casual golf and corporate golf in scrambles with people who picked up clubs once or twice a year, and who marvelled at shots I would hit without any clue that they were a groove low, or a tad off the heel.  My 30's might qualify at the second chapter, but it was more like finding rock bottom in my golf game, with, an occasional round in the 60's.

      A really good home life, and the knowledge that I still enjoy golf, led me to start practicing again.  I used to hit a lot of balls (1-2,000 a week) but now I was averaging 150 a month.  As 40 loomed, I joined a private club and started practicing more, but more importantly, started re-introducing myself to a competitive environment where I had to shake the rust off, invest in newer clubs, and simply play less with golfers who were not pushing me to improve myself.

      Chapter 2 had begun.  Now it was 25-30 games a year, and a little more practice.  But life also now allowed me to start planning and taking golf trips.  My interest was picking up.  The Okanagan and Vancouver Island golf trips inspired me to finally plan and go to Scotland.

      From the moment I arrived in St. Andrews with friends in late August 2016, spent 5 days there and 2 more at Carnoustie, I was in love with golf again.  Perspective is a powerful tool, if you are paying attention.  Since then, a road trip to Chambers Bay and Bandon Dunes, and a getaway trip to Scottsdale and West Phoenix have only fueled my desire to start playing good golf again.

      For the first time, in a long time, I am frustrated at the slow pace that I am achieving results.  I now need to be smarter about how I play and realize that my body is not what it once was (but that is just a decision to not accept it and work to get it back).  Most importantly, I understand far better what I am doing (and why), and have the knowledge of how to make needed adjustments.  If ever there was a time to be patient and stay engaged, it is now.

      I write this on a Sunday, having hit balls quite well while practicing during the week, but still not quite able to translate those swings to the golf course.  Knowing how to miss, and a decent short game still led to a 73 this morning, but there were a lot of strokes left on the golf course today.  The journey continues.

      This Forum looks like a logical progression for my second chapter.  I was introduced to it back in 2012, but clearly wasn't ready to be involved.  Now I am.  I will engage when I can and look forward to hearing comments from others.  One goal is to be a competitive scratch player again.  So at some point, tournament golf must follow.

       

      ​Santa
    • By bigtedrx
      Hey guys, just wanted to share the deal I got on the Evnroll ER3 WingBlade. Retailmenot.com has a 20% off coupon online good for today. Evnroll is not excluded from the coupon and I got the ER3 for $263.20 plus Free shipping. Hope this helps someone!
    • By GolfSpy Dave
      Dave's Putter Profile: The Miura KM-009

      "This classic toe-weighted design proves it is possible to match looks with performance."
      -Hoyt McGarity, President of Miura Golf.
       
      Miura Makes Great Irons (and Putters!)

       
      Since I've actually never owned a set of Miura irons (sadness), I'm actually going with a bit of faith on the first part of that title above. However, I've never met a person who has bemoaned anything about Miura irons. OK, so maybe I've heard some grumblings about price, which is why I don't own a set of them, but I have never heard anyone talk trash about the irons themselves.
       
      I do have first hand experience with Miura putters though, and to a putter, the build quality has been exceptional. Putters for Miura Golf are not just haphazardly produced to fill that fourteenth spot in the bag. They are a legit Miura product, and they live up to the Miura name. For reference, you can read my takes on the KM-007 and the KM-008 putters by clicking those links.
       
      Today, we are going to take a closer look at the newest Miura Golf putter model, the KM-009.
       

       
      "Although putters aren't our core focus, the Miura family has never attached their name to any product that did not live up to their extremely high standards."
      -Hoyt McGarity, President of Miura Golf.
       
      The KM-009 is not a Cameron 009

       
      Let's get the potential elephant out of the way first. Some of you leading the putter-obsessed lifestyle are well aware that Scotty Cameron makes a 009 model as well. The Miura KM-009 is in no way intended to mirror that putter at all. In this case, KM-009 just happens to be the next number in the putter naming sequence. You saw the KM-007 and KM-008 numbers above, right?
       
      Though both the Cameron 009 and the Miura KM-009 are heel-toe-weighted blades, when you look at the putters, you'll quickly see that their common ancestor was a while back on the putter tree of life. These are cousins, not twins.
       
      With that out of the way, let's explore the looks and play of the KM-009.
       
      Looks

       
      The KM-009 is a classic in the looks category. I love the lines of this putter at address. Though the topline is rolled, it still has that overall rectangular profile that I like to see behind the ball.
       
      The one thing that stands out is the thickness of the topline. Here is a shot next to my Vault Anser 2 so you can see just how much thicker the top of the KM-009 is in comparison.
       

       
      This thicker topline is one of those putter visual elements that some of you will like, and some of you will not like. I had one friend tell me that the thicker top makes it appear closed to him. I don't get that, but the point is that these little visual tweaks will affect each of us a little differently.
       

       
      The white chrome finish is a bright one in full sun, but not to the point of needing to only look at it indirectly like a high polished stainless finish would require. You are not going to get Twilight-vampire sparkle with the sun overhead, but this finish is a bright one for sure.
       

       
      In terms of precision, the milling on this putter is pretty darn spectacular. I know that zero Miura fans are shocked at this, but even so, the tightness of the milling really stands out. I love that they have mixed in a bit of flair on the bottom with the giant logo. Most of the putter is subtle; then the bottom gives you BAM. Love that design element. The milled lines on the back corners are a cool aesthetic touch as well.
       
      Performance

       
      The KM-009 gave me a bit of a surprise on the course. I anticipated the feel being a bit heavy for my tastes, and it was a bit heavy feeling during the swing. No fault to Muira there, of course. My preferred head weight is around 345g, and the KM-009 weighs in at 360g. The extra weight does make it very stable during the swing, but I just like it a bit lighter. Again, you may go the exact opposite of me on this, preferring the feel of a heavier head.
       
      One aspect of play that sent me back to the spec sheet was the firmness of impact. In a blind taste test, I probably would have said that the KM-009 was made of stainless steel. It's not. The KM-009 is made of mild (carbon) steel, but it feels firmer at impact than what I usually associate with carbon steel. It's carbon though. I did the magnet test to be sure...
       
      The firmness culprit is likely that thick front section. There is a bunch of mass behind the ball at impact, this likely imparting that thicker/firmer feeling at impact. It's a thunker, not a clicker. The firmness is coming from mass, and not metal. Those of you who have rolled the thick-fronted Kronos Touch would know what to expect from the KM-009.
       

       
      Once you get used to the impact feel, you'll see that the overall feedback is excellent. You can definitely pick up the differences when the ball hits various parts of the face. Just play some dead-off-the-toe putts on those short downhillers, and you will feel how the KM-009 lets you know where the ball hit the face.
       
      All in all, the performance and play of the KM-009 is old school. It relies on shape and metal to roll the ball as opposed to modern materials and fancy groove technologies. It is probably not a putter that will make you immediately better on the greens once you roll it. This is more of a long-term relationship putter. You spend time with it, roll balls with it, discover its nuances, and with the investment in discovery, you will likely find that you have developed an effective putting relationship with this finely-crafted flatstick. 
       
      And the price...

       
      Here is where things get crazy. The price on the KM-009 is only $400! Wild stuff there, right? Now before you frugal crusaders attack your keyboards, think about the fact that most premium putters in the market today are above $300, with the new 2018 Scotty Cameron Select line also costing $400. Like it or not, that's what these putters run these days.
       
      I actually thought that the KM-009 would cost more. Miura irons are expensive after all, and the KM-008 was priced at $450...
       
      The thing is, I have a feeling that this putter will be exactly what some golfers are looking for in a market that has not satisfied their needs. Some putterheads are not happy that the last few lines of Camerons have had the face insert, as opposed to being fully milled. The KM-009 is forged mild steel, through and through. Nothing but milled metal here.
       
      Milled putter purists should welcome this one with open arms.
       
      Miura Golf is known for making some of the finest forged irons in golf. Why would their putters be any different? Hopefully you have a Miura dealer near you so you can check out the Miura KM-009 first hand. If you've never rolled one of their putters before, you are in for a treat.

       
  • Recent Topics

  • Latest from the Blog

  • Happy Birthday Today!

×
×
  • Create New...