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How to know if shafts are spined?

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Just wondering......does it make a difference to have the shafts spine aligned, then use the various adjustments that come with the club (8.5 - 11.5 degrees)?  How does the club adjustment change the spine alignment?

As long as the shaft isn't rotated then it won't matter. So basically, it depends which type of adapter you have. I can change the loft on my razr fit extreme without changing the spine.

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Just wondering......does it make a difference to have the shafts spine aligned, then use the various adjustments that come with the club (8.5 - 11.5 degrees)?  How does the club adjustment change the spine alignment?

Find the setting that works best and then have the adapter pulled and the shaft aligned and put the tip back on.

This is a point about adjustable drivers I am often making. It's their biggest caveat in my opinion.

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I haven't read all of the this thread, but my question is, if I Can find the NBP of a shaft, what position in relation to the head should the NBP be located? Should it face the target, should it face away from the target?

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Find the setting that works best and then have the adapter pulled and the shaft aligned and put the tip back on.

This is a point about adjustable drivers I am often making. It's their biggest caveat in my opinion.

Some (Callaway) adapter sleeves use cogs instead of turning the shaft to achieve the different settings,
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Some (Callaway) adapter sleeves use cogs instead of turning the shaft to achieve the different settings,

Precisely why I like the Titleist adapter as well!

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Here is a question, if there was an iron shaft that you didn't have to spine align, would you use it? I've heard of one that is almost perfectly round.

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Here is a question, if there was an iron shaft that you didn't have to spine align, would you use it? I've heard of one that is almost perfectly round.

I doubt I would prefer it over my x7s but if it fits me better than sure.

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Here is a question, if there was an iron shaft that you didn't have to spine align, would you use it? I've heard of one that is almost perfectly round.

What is it BTW?

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Jaskanski is pretty spot on here.  Not many shafts are truly round.  Some are notoriously "unround".  Feel this with your own hands and you too will be a believer.  As for me and mine....we spine.

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not sure if serious or sarcasm :-|

Ha ha, whoops. I totally misread your post. Thought it said what is BTW? Missed the "it"

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Can I ask why the spine goes to 12 and not 6? I've always heard 6

Look again. He shows the spine at 12-6 and nbp at 9-3. The spine will be in one direction and nbp 90° to that.

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Can I ask why the spine goes to 12 and not 6? I've always heard 6

 

Good question. 

When most club fitters refer to a "spine" it also refers to an imaginary line that bisects the cross section of the shaft. It doesn't rely imply that the spine itself that is on one side of the shaft of the other, but rather that the shaft is essentially asymmetrical in cross section or slightly oval (we're talking microns here) in other words. 

This may well be true in some designs of graphite shafts, but in the manufacture of some steel shafts it's an inescapable fact that a well seam will be on one side of the shaft - this is basically where the steel is rolled to form a tube and welded together. 

This means that the actual walls of the shaft will incur a variable mount of thickness in relation to the rest of the shaft (again we're talking microns here) which puts a "spine" fairly and squarely in a detectable portion of the shaft.

So, the NBP is aligned at right angles to the club face in the 3 o'clock to 9 o'clock plane. Many fitters align the "spine" at the 12 o'clock position for two reasons - 1. 12 o'clock is at the top of most clocks and fits with the graphic in terms of how the club appears at address (lol)

2. (and possibly more importantly) positioning at 12 o'clock takes into account toe droop. A shaft is least likely to bend in the upwards plane (towards 12 o'clock) in any part of the swing towards impact due to the force applied and gravity during the swing. It actually does go toe up during the back swing and through transition, but this has little to do with where the ball wants to go.

If nothing else, keeping with a theory and sticking to it has a better chance of creating some sort of consistency when building set - and that is what it is all about after all. It can be a bit confusing sometimes, but a little bit a simple science applied can cut through a whole heap of conjecture and guesswork. And I certain like to keep it simple. I hope it makes sense...

 

http://www.tutelman.com/golf/shafts/ShaftLab3.php

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