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mbrodeur86

Groove Sharpeners - Do they work?

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My 59 degree Scor wedge does not spin the ball - at all. It's not a technique issue as my Mack Daddy's did. I've been looking around the net and have seen groove sharpeners. My questions are: Do they work? What do you recommend? 

 

I really need the ball to sit like it used to. Cost me some strokes yesterday. 

 

 

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Where were you hitting the shots from? Grooves themselves don't affect spin much if any except when you're in the rough and grass is getting trapped between the face and ball. The grooves channel debris and moisture away. They don't do much to actually grip the ball otherwise. Some say they do nothing at all if it's clean. The same principle for using slick tires for racing as long as the pavement is dry. If you have a clean strike from the fairway, you won't see a difference.

 

The sharpener can deepen the grooves some if you work at it. Make sure it's clamped solidly. Also know the club is not conforming once you do that if that matters to you.

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Just regular shots they don't spin. If I compare them with the mack daddy 2's I had there is no spin at all. Ball lands and rolls across the green.

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IMO, groove sharpeners dont work because all they do is cut the grooves deeper.  If the shoulder of the grooves are still worn down and rounded off, thats not going to really help.  What you really want to do is to CNC mill the face of the wedge, so that the shoulders of the grooves and sharp and square again, like when the club was new.

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Groove sharpeners work well on forged clubs because when you use them, rust develops in the grooves and from then on, they're easier to gauge out.

 

A machine shop works best on stainless clubs which won't wear nearly as quickly.

 

It's a sore subject with me.

 

The USGA will remain clueless forever, it seems.  All the rule changes are geared to tournament players when recreational players are the heart of the game. 

 

They decided the old 1.62" R&A size ball was insufficiently influenced by the wind. They not only banned it from their competitions, but bullied the R&A into adopting 1.68" as well.

 

They decided that playing with a complete set was too easy, so they came up with the fourteen-club rule. (I love having to leave clubs that cost me three figures each in my locker when I play in a member-guest.)

 

They came up with the 2010 groove rule, but not because the box grooves were making the game too easy for us.

 

Somehow, they allowed drivers to swell to a cartoonish 460cc, but when they realized their mistake, they established COR limits just not to admit that they were asleep at the wheel while somebody was impregnating the titanium drivers.

 

Finally, they set up the US Open venues so that a good, single digit club player couldn't break 100.  It's OUR game. Let the tour guys play at 6000 or 6300 yards so we can actually see how much better than us they are!   7200 yards with burnt out brown greens that have elephants buried under them doesn't even allow us a reference point.

 

As a boxing fan, I often lament the number of ridiculous, alphabet soup sanctioning bodies that have cheapened the sport.  Golf seems to have the opposite problem.  I think that the USGA really needs a competitor. It's not the R&A which, despite being the senior body, seems content to be the USGA's lap dog.

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Just regular shots they don't spin. If I compare them with the mack daddy 2's I had there is no spin at all. Ball lands and rolls across the green.

Badger said it. The face condition is the biggest factor. It's not like the ball squishes into grooves. A milled face with no grooves would spin the ball more than with grooves on a clean strike. Once you try that in the rough though, it would slide up the face more and have very little spin.

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Yes groove sharpeners work for cleaning up the grooves, squaring them out and redoing the radius of the edges. Thing is, unless you use a gauge, they'll be out of tolerances and outside the rules. The best one out there is the Golfsmith tool that looks like a screwdriver with replaceable heads. It'll do v and square groves.

 

Material doesn't matter, just remember to tape off both ends of the score lines in case you slip with the tool

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RB7 opines that the type of steel doesn't matter.  That's not my experience, but I wouldn't claim to be an expert on the subject.  Just try it, I guess.

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I have the exact same tool as Phil ! I haven't used mine in a few years but I think it helped clean up some rounded shoulders, etc. I like messing around with clubs so it was kind of fun to do. Did my club performance improve? Maybe. Do I think it did? Perhaps. Will it hurt to try it out? Neh.

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Just a different point of view.

 

I have never had Scors but I had 2 sets of Cobra SS Forged. SS=skid sole. A very similar grind to the Scors.

 

I noticed when chipping the ball would react differently than with non skid sole. Yes it was definitely more forgiving on the chunky shot but it also seemed like the ball would roll up the face a little more before it would grab (moreso on those slightly chunky shots). It spun less then.

 

I have no explanation for it. Just real world experience.

 

FYI I also use MD2s now and among all the newer wedges those and the RTX spin the most for me.

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I really liked the rtx 2.0 when I tried them at the demo day. I bought the Scor's after everyone here has raved so much about them. They are the best I've hit out of bunker without exception. I'm surprisingly tired of switching out clubs all the time too but I certainly do not want to make the grooves illegal. I understand the rule for us amateurs and stuff but for me it's principle. I'm not sure if I will sell the Scor's, or get the sharpener and take my chances. 

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I'll add a couple of thoughts if I may. I do believe that groves help/assist spinning the ball. Not just out of the rough but also from closely mowed grass. Additionally I believe a wedge should be replaced or even re-grooved when they get worn down. And they do. I'm come to notice from actual experience that the surface of the wedge helps grip the ball to some degree. My wedges for instance have normal grooves and a micro-groove etched or cut into the face in a circular type fashion. These wedges have the best stopping power of any wedges I've ever played. Some of my regular competitors have even remarked at how I'm able to stop my shots. They joke that have illegal clubs. They're not of course. Now with all that it's also a huge factor as to how you strike the ball. Perhaps the most important. As my game/ball striking has improved through the years so has my ability to control spin thereby hitting shots that hit, hop and stop. From short fairway grass I like to "pinch" it at times. 

I'd probably use my Groove tool again at least once before deciding I need a new wedge. Can't hurt and it's much cheaper than getting fit for a new wedge.

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My I20's came with a I20 gap (50 degree) a sand (54 with kbs shaft) and a 60 (I tour) wedge. I gave them a run yesterday and thought they were pretty good. I'm going to get the groove sharpener anyway and take my chances. I'll get one that says it makes them legal just to be safe and add some piece of mind. 

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RB7 opines that the type of steel doesn't matter. That's not my experience, but I wouldn't claim to be an expert on the subject. Just try it, I guess.

It's not an opinion it's a scientific fact with the tool I specifically mentioned. The head is made from carbide tool steel that's significantly harder than any base metal of any golf club. It cuts through them like butter. That's why I referenced the specific tool I did. Those cheap ones that look like a utility knife and the ones that are from groove sharpener.com on eBay and look like screwdrivers on both ends are made from significantly softer metals (the groovesharpener one is made from carbon steel) will dull quick in harder metals. If you buy a quality tool you'll get quality results.

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You cannot guarantee they will be legal after. I've seen one used and if you use it with extra effort the spaces and edges created could be illegal.

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I can live with that. I'm already an outlaw with my fifteen slot bag.

 

Not really illegal, though. At least none of the New England states have statutes demanding compliance with the rules of golf!

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