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Graphite shaft for putters?

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3 minutes ago, GolfSpy MPR said:

Interesting, @yungkory. Is there some claims about what the KBS shaft is supposed to be doing? The description on their own website couldn't possibly be more generic: "The KBS CT Tour Putter Shaft is the first shaft for your putter to incorporate KBS Golf Shaft Technology into your game on the green."

Translation: "The KBS putter shaft is—wait for it—a putter shaft that's made by KBS!"

EDIT: I was looking at this as a cheap experiment option: https://www.ebay.com/itm/NEW-Graphite-Matrix-Kujoh-CFI-85g-Extra-Stiff-Flex-Iron-Shaft-40-370/202573802374

  • CONSTANT WEIGHT
  • STIFFER STRUCTURE
  • STIFFER TIP

 

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1 hour ago, GolfSpy MPR said:

Kicking this idea around, and so I thought I'd revive this old thread.

With the ascendance of the Stroke Lab putters, along with the Stability shafts, UST Frequency Filtered shafts, and DeChambeau playing graphite in his putter, anyone else try just a graphite shaft in their putters? I understand that Stroke Lab, Stability, and UST are all multi-material.

I just ordered a Gravity Grip, and I'm considering building it with graphite just to see if it makes any difference in feel and (especially) in my stroke.

I had a crappy old putter with a graphite shaft in it (still may be around in my attic somewhere). I liked the way the shaft felt, but the head was too light and I struggled quite a bit with long putts. I've wondered on occasion about getting another putter like that, but I'm happy with what I've got right now. I don't see a real need to change.

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Bumping this post yet again, because I'm thinking about (yet another) experiment.

I just finished my off-season putter test, and the winner was my Odyssey EXO with my DIY Stroke Lab shaft. A putter that did well but not enough to finish on top was my new Frontline Elevado slant neck.

Before the testing began, I put a Flat Cat Tek slim on the Elevado, and I think that was a mistake. The stock grip on the Frontlines is quite heavy (120g) and the Flat Cat is quite light (64g). Swapping the grips made the putter very head heavy, to the point that I really felt like I had to steer it through the stroke.

So I want to tweak it a little more. I was considering building up another DIY Stroke Lab for it, and I still might. But let me ask this: can anyone suggest a reason that a steel tip section is going to perform differently than if I just went all graphite? The core advertised benefit of the Stroke Lab isn't stability; it's that the weight distribution to the grip and head (and out of the shaft) improves the stroke.

I have a sneaky suspicion that the steel tip of the Stroke Lab has as much to do with aesthetics and advertising (Stroke Lab putters are immediately recognizable on Tour TV broadcasts) as it is performance.

Anyone have any thoughts on this?

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On 11/19/2019 at 8:47 AM, GolfSpy MPR said:

Bumping this post yet again, because I'm thinking about (yet another) experiment.

I just finished my off-season putter test, and the winner was my Odyssey EXO with my DIY Stroke Lab shaft. A putter that did well but not enough to finish on top was my new Frontline Elevado slant neck.

Before the testing began, I put a Flat Cat Tek slim on the Elevado, and I think that was a mistake. The stock grip on the Frontlines is quite heavy (120g) and the Flat Cat is quite light (64g). Swapping the grips made the putter very head heavy, to the point that I really felt like I had to steer it through the stroke.

So I want to tweak it a little more. I was considering building up another DIY Stroke Lab for it, and I still might. But let me ask this: can anyone suggest a reason that a steel tip section is going to perform differently than if I just went all graphite? The core advertised benefit of the Stroke Lab isn't stability; it's that the weight distribution to the grip and head (and out of the shaft) improves the stroke.

I have a sneaky suspicion that the steel tip of the Stroke Lab has as much to do with aesthetics and advertising (Stroke Lab putters are immediately recognizable on Tour TV broadcasts) as it is performance.

Anyone have any thoughts on this?

I would agree with this. Kinda like Bubba's bi matrix shaft. it stands out. they could have accomplished the same thing with an all graphite or all steel shaft right? 

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Ive owned a couple JDM putters that had graphite shafts, one a Mizuno and the other a Yamaha and they were OK.  They were very light and didnt have a whole lot of feel though.

I guess that I really dont see what the advantage to a graphite shaft in a putter would be.  With the rest of the clubs, they are lighter and give you more clubhead speed but in putters thats not really the issue.

I would think that steel would be better because it would make the club heavier and would make it easier to make a smooth, pendulum stroke.

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5 minutes ago, ZenGolfer said:

I would think that steel would be better because it would make the club heavier and would make it easier to make a smooth, pendulum stroke.

High total weight isn't always ideal.  This has been the trend in the industry and as heads have gotten heavier  people started counterbalancing to get back proper feel.  The problem is that the higher weight will influence the stroke and potentially make it worse.    Most people assume heavier leads to smoother which isn't always the cases.     The idea behind stroke lab is to lighten total weight and use graphite to distribute weight to the head and grip to give that same feel.  

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15 hours ago, cnosil said:

High total weight isn't always ideal.  This has been the trend in the industry and as heads have gotten heavier  people started counterbalancing to get back proper feel.  The problem is that the higher weight will influence the stroke and potentially make it worse.    Most people assume heavier leads to smoother which isn't always the cases.     The idea behind stroke lab is to lighten total weight and use graphite to distribute weight to the head and grip to give that same feel.  

Low total weight isn't ideal either.  One of the first putters I ever had was made by a local company no longer in business.  Looked very pretty... brass head and red/black graphite shaft, but it was so light, I couldn't control my stroke.

IMG_0206.jpg.621442bdedf07b6a9aa21a483ec0bc11.jpg

 

I moved on to the Heavy Putter and had a lot of success keeping the head square at impact.  That led to my Ping Sigma G Doon with a 400g head and counterbalance... perfect!  I tried every putter with head weights 340-370g and nothing felt right and results were atrocious.  We are all so different!!!

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20 hours ago, cnosil said:

High total weight isn't always ideal.  This has been the trend in the industry and as heads have gotten heavier  people started counterbalancing to get back proper feel.  The problem is that the higher weight will influence the stroke and potentially make it worse.    Most people assume heavier leads to smoother which isn't always the cases.     The idea behind stroke lab is to lighten total weight and use graphite to distribute weight to the head and grip to give that same feel.  

Im not sure that I agree with you on the Stroke Lab.  It isnt so much that they made it lighter as they made the head a little heavier, removed a lot of weight from the shaft but made it stiffer and added weight to the grip to counterbalance it.

In some ways, they made it even more head heavy that putters traditionally are.  IMO, much of the magic in Stroke Lab is in the stiffer shaft.

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Some very successful puttees have used very light putters. Crenshaw, Faxon and Tiger. I would venture a guess that Tiger's putter is the lightest on tour. One thing they all have in common is incredible feel. Something us mere mortals don't have. As with everything YMMV. 

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26 minutes ago, ZenGolfer said:

Im not sure that I agree with you on the Stroke Lab.  It isnt so much that they made it lighter as they made the head a little heavier, removed a lot of weight from the shaft but made it stiffer and added weight to the grip to counterbalance it.

In some ways, they made it even more head heavy that putters traditionally are.  IMO, much of the magic in Stroke Lab is in the stiffer shaft.

Does Odyssey claim any stability/stiffness benefits to the Stroke Lab shaft? All I recall when I looked it up is that they said that the weight distribution promoted a better stroke.

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I have a putter with a graphite shaft...my Frankly Frog.  I have two putters with hickory shafts, and of course, a bag full of putters with steel shafts.

Given that none of them are any good, not even the least bit good, I don't think the shaft matters.

Someday, somebody will design a putter with which human beings can actually putt a ball into a hole. (Maybe.)

It's already too late for me.

But will it happen in any of your lifetimes?

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56 minutes ago, NiftyNiblick said:

I have a putter with a graphite shaft...my Frankly Frog.  I have two putters with hickory shafts, and of course, a bag full of putters with steel shafts.

Given that none of them are any good, not even the least bit good, I don't think the shaft matters.

Someday, somebody will design a putter with which human beings can actually putt a ball into a hole. (Maybe.)

It's already too late for me.

But will it happen in any of your lifetimes?

 Perhaps the reason the putters aren't any good is that they don't fit your stroke pattern and they are moving against your tendencies.  Or that it isn't the putter at all but the ability to translate what you saw into a feeling that your could replicate in your stroke.   

Picking the putter is the easy part,  it is managing expectations and being able to properly interpret the information you collected into the proper stroke.  

Then there is the rub of the green,  the unseen bumps in the green that throw your perfectly struck ball offline.  

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8 minutes ago, cnosil said:

 Perhaps the reason the putters aren't any good is that they don't fit your stroke pattern and they are moving against your tendencies.  Or that it isn't the putter at all but the ability to translate what you saw into a feeling that your could replicate in your stroke.   

Picking the putter is the easy part,  it is managing expectations and being able to properly interpret the information you collected into the proper stroke.  

Then there is the rub of the green,  the unseen bumps in the green that throw your perfectly struck ball offline.  

Perhaps so, cnosil, but I spent a lifetime turning well struck approach shots into meaninglessness with erratic putting.

Too late now.  I guess that i didn't find the right guro while I was still able to play. Also, and I say this with regret now, but putting was the most boring thing to practice. 

 

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On 11/22/2019 at 2:56 PM, GolfSpy MPR said:

Does Odyssey claim any stability/stiffness benefits to the Stroke Lab shaft? All I recall when I looked it up is that they said that the weight distribution promoted a better stroke.

This is what I understand as well. 

 

https://blog.odysseygolf.com/strokelab/

HOW IT WORKS

Most putting strokes are inconsistent. Yet most putting technologies focus on improving alignment or the quality of roll. That’s all good, but there’s more help needed.
Our new Stroke Lab putters actually help improve the golfer’s stroke, including backswing length, face angle at impact, head speed through impact and tempo, all through a profound change in weight distribution made possible by an innovative new shaft. This is a completely new approach and only Odyssey has it.

 

 

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