Jump to content
chemclub

Ben Hogan Hybrids

Recommended Posts

Posted this already in the PTx iron forum but thought I would start a new thread for the hybrids (I don't know if this is good forum etiquette). I am in the market for a new one and the offerings from Hogan look really interesting. Love the design.

 

http://www.benhogangolf.com/hybrid

hogan-hybrid.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's a sweet looking hybrid. I like the weight adjustability. Looks very Adams-ish, I read somewhere in MGS that some Adams people went to Hogan. I'd definitely give it a go, only issue is actually testing it on grass, not sure where retailers/fitters are.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The idea pro that looks like this new one from BH is quite possibly one of the best hybrids ever made IMO. It looks like they've done a great job at updating and improving upon that head. Should perform extremely well!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The idea pro that looks like this new one from BH is quite possibly one of the best hybrids ever made IMO. It looks like they've done a great job at updating and improving upon that head. Should perform extremely well!

I loved that hybrid only got rid of it because the shaft became too stiff for me. In fact my kid has the 20 in his bag still and kills it. This hybrid just made my list of must try clubs and its a short list.

 

Thanks for the thread chemclub!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Much like the Adams line of hybrids, I'm sure I'm in the minority here, but I think these are quite ugly, and don't appeal to me at all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Has anyone found any info on price. The website talks about a new HybridFit web app but it doesn't look like it is up yet either.

 

I wonder if BH has plans to launch a line of driver/fairway woods? Terry Koehler is a wedge guy so it seems natural natural for them to sit in the "iron" space. I also feel like there are so many driver companies out there do we really need another 'me too'

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted over on the blog some of the basics on the VKTR, including where the heck the name came from, and the designer who already has some pretty legendary hybrid designs in his resume...

 

Click here to check it out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The first hybrids that I remember seeing came out right around the turn of the millennium. These were the TaylorMade Firesole Burner Rescue clubs. They were made of titanium rather than steel, painted an orange copper color, and came in four lofts--15, 18, 21, and 24º. I remember hitting some cage shots with them in a shop at Caesars Palace. There was no monitor, so I had no idea what I was hitting.

 

Now it's hard to find someone who doesn't play hybrids, but for the most part, they're described as long iron replacements. People often start their iron sets with a strong five iron now, equivalent to a vintage 3-iron. In other words, the 5-iron is now a long iron, and it's often still not replaced.

 

I guess that I never really got the long-iron replacement concept because I've regularly bagged fairway woods of 20º loft and more, all the way, at one point, to a 29º Stan Thompson Ginty. Even now in the metal-wood era, I've got a 25º Spalding Top Flite Intimidator 400 7-wood that's perfectly playable, even with its weird .400 tip Fenwick shaft.

 

So now the thing is this: I can understand how hybrids are easier to hit than 1, 2, 3, 4, and maybe even the new strong-lofted 5-irons. Strong-lofted irons require lots of brute force to go along with the square hit in order to yield good carry. Slower swing speed players are going to have better luck with the hybrids.

 

But why are hybrids easier to hit than high loft fairway woods? They still have the bulge and roll so you can't pick with them--you've got to sweep them like woods. They don't launch the ball out of thick rough as well as the keel- or rail-soled metal wood. I guess that I never needed hybrids because I was already playing 5- and 7-woods. I prefer the "driving-iron" type utility. They're sole and perimeter weighted, very forgiving, they have no bulge and roll, and they're just very comfortable to hit on scary driving holes.

 

This being the case, as much as I laud the new Hogan Company, these new hybrids don't excite me too much.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am intrigued......just need to see what custom shafts you can get since 85g is a bit light for my taste.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The first hybrids that I remember seeing came out right around the turn of the millennium. These were the TaylorMade Firesole Burner Rescue clubs. They were made of titanium rather than steel, painted an orange copper color, and came in four lofts--15, 18, 21, and 24º. I remember hitting some cage shots with them in a shop at Caesars Palace. There was no monitor, so I had no idea what I was hitting.

 

Now it's hard to find someone who doesn't play hybrids, but for the most part, they're described as long iron replacements. People often start their iron sets with a strong five iron now, equivalent to a vintage 3-iron. In other words, the 5-iron is now a long iron, and it's often still not replaced.

 

I guess that I never really got the long-iron replacement concept because I've regularly bagged fairway woods of 20º loft and more, all the way, at one point, to a 29º Stan Thompson Ginty. Even now in the metal-wood era, I've got a 25º Spalding Top Flite Intimidator 400 7-wood that's perfectly playable, even with its weird .400 tip Fenwick shaft.

 

So now the thing is this: I can understand how hybrids are easier to hit than 1, 2, 3, 4, and maybe even the new strong-lofted 5-irons. Strong-lofted irons require lots of brute force to go along with the square hit in order to yield good carry. Slower swing speed players are going to have better luck with the hybrids.

 

But why are hybrids easier to hit than high loft fairway woods? They still have the bulge and roll so you can't pick with them--you've got to sweep them like woods. They don't launch the ball out of thick rough as well as the keel- or rail-soled metal wood. I guess that I never needed hybrids because I was already playing 5- and 7-woods. I prefer the "driving-iron" type utility. They're sole and perimeter weighted, very forgiving, they have no bulge and roll, and they're just very comfortable to hit on scary driving holes.

 

This being the case, as much as I laud the new Hogan Company, these new hybrids don't excite me too much.

Given my experience with fairway woods (my best clubs), hybrids (meh) and 4 or 5 irons (usually very good for me), I have the same questions, especially since I can't hit a hybrid consistently out of the rough and not nearly as well as a five or six iron out of the rough.  If I didn't have a Packer head cover for my hybrid, it would probably be out of my bag.

 

Oops, just realized this was a Hogan new product thread-we should take  our hybrid blasphemies to another thread.  We bad.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The first hybrids that I remember seeing came out right around the turn of the millennium. These were the TaylorMade Firesole Burner Rescue clubs. They were made of titanium rather than steel, painted an orange copper color, and came in four lofts--15, 18, 21, and 24º. I remember hitting some cage shots with them in a shop at Caesars Palace. There was no monitor, so I had no idea what I was hitting.

 

Now it's hard to find someone who doesn't play hybrids, but for the most part, they're described as long iron replacements. People often start their iron sets with a strong five iron now, equivalent to a vintage 3-iron. In other words, the 5-iron is now a long iron, and it's often still not replaced.

 

I guess that I never really got the long-iron replacement concept because I've regularly bagged fairway woods of 20º loft and more, all the way, at one point, to a 29º Stan Thompson Ginty. Even now in the metal-wood era, I've got a 25º Spalding Top Flite Intimidator 400 7-wood that's perfectly playable, even with its weird .400 tip Fenwick shaft.

 

So now the thing is this: I can understand how hybrids are easier to hit than 1, 2, 3, 4, and maybe even the new strong-lofted 5-irons. Strong-lofted irons require lots of brute force to go along with the square hit in order to yield good carry. Slower swing speed players are going to have better luck with the hybrids.

 

But why are hybrids easier to hit than high loft fairway woods? They still have the bulge and roll so you can't pick with them--you've got to sweep them like woods. They don't launch the ball out of thick rough as well as the keel- or rail-soled metal wood. I guess that I never needed hybrids because I was already playing 5- and 7-woods. I prefer the "driving-iron" type utility. They're sole and perimeter weighted, very forgiving, they have no bulge and roll, and they're just very comfortable to hit on scary driving holes.

 

This being the case, as much as I laud the new Hogan Company, these new hybrids don't excite me too much.

 

My love of hybrids started 5 years ago when I replaced all of my woods. I picked up a TM R11 18* Rescue and absolutely crushed it, still do. I only picked up the matching 21* last year for $30 so I could replace my 3-iron which I could never really hit. Hybrids, like fairway metals just have the lower center of gravity to help get the ball in the air (my issue with my 3i). I still do pretty well with my 4i but still might consider dropping it for a hybrid. So for me at least it is just a style thing. I could probably play fairway woods just the same, but I played for so long with a Titleist PT 980F 15* that I could hit a mile ( (just not very ofte, small face)

 
My guess for why hybrids over higher lofter fairways… Ladies hit 7-woods brah. A pretty silly macho idea that real men hit long irons. I would rather hit the green than slap shot a 2-iron with a low slice. The hybrid is simply not a wood in many peoples eyes so they stay manly I guess. Any other ideas.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I really like it. One of my favorite hybrids is the Hogan CFT. As I look at these I see a bunch of Adams and a Bunch of Original Hogan influence. The weighyt system on the out side is interesting and its good to see another (taylormade used to do this) company put the weights on the back like the driver. This could also help people who say Hybrids are hook machines for them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nifty and Jax its a matter of what fits the eye. Also I know that Nifty isn't a fan of strong lofts. To be fair newer irons need stronger lofts because of the way they are weighted. You'd balloon the ball with the old weaker lofts.

 

Personally I like having at least one hybrid and one fairway wood in my bag, at least one, I actually have two of each right now but five iron is making a strong case to return. The Adams Idea pro was my favorite hybrid ever and this hybrid looks like a remake of it.

 

If we all thought the same clubs were appealing then what would be the sense of this web site? :)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've never been a fan of hogan clubs (preferring mizuno) even though they were top notch quality when forged in Texas.

However, these hybrids as others have stated, follow the Adams designers are beautiful!!

Best part is you can pick the exact loft! I have all the previous generation Adams hybrids in 3,4&5h (idea pro, 9031, super pro tour issue, idea pro 9031 tour issue, xtd, ). My only minute complaint was that I couldn't get a 22* 4h ( only idea pro did I even find one on eBay ) so I extend my 23* slightly to kinda match a 22*

And I've never been a fan of the current Taylor hybrids with adjustability (imho current TM engineering after using all of the Adams left over intellectual property)

I may get a couple off these - the updated idea pro original! :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Daily Deals

  • Sponsors

  • Our Sponsors

     
     
     

  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      79,994
    • Most Online
      2,247

    Newest Member
    RMD
    Joined
  • Similar Content

    • By Golfspy_CG2
      Testers Announced!
      These are the forum members who will be testing the Tour Edge Exotics CBX 119 Hybrid:
      @fozcycle @MattF @bens197 @dhartmann34 ______________________________________________________

       
      Hybrids have long been a love/hate club for many players.  Many love them and the forgiveness they offer, and many hate them for their tendency to hook.  Finding the perfect or even dependable hybrid is often an ever going process for many players.   It's also not one you see a lot on the PGA Tour.  But if you have spent any time watching the PGA Tour Champions over the past couple months, you no doubt have noticed two things. 
      1) A big tour presence by Tour Edge, in not only it's well established fairway woods, but more recently the  Exotics CBX hybrid popping up in the bags of Scott McCarron and others.  The club has been vital to McCarron as he has won two events in the last three weeks.   What makes this hybrid so attractive, well  we'll if a picture is worth 1,000 words, then a video must be worth at least 2,000.   So see for yourself
       So there it is, we're looking for four testers to test, review and keep a Tour Edge Excotics CBX 119 hybrid of your choice.  Follow the instructions below. 
      Per the OEM's request this testing is open to Right Handed Golfers in the US. 
      Do Not Quote this post in your entry:  Doing so may lead to disqualification.
      Provide the following information:
      First Name/City, State
      Handicap/SS
      Current hybrid model Played
      What loft you think you would choose and why
      We'll be picking the testers sometime next week so check back to see if you've been selected.  Good Luck!!
       
    • By Golfspy_CG2
      CONGRATULATIONS TO THE FOLLOWING MEMBERS FOR BEING SELECTED...STAY TUNED FOR MORE INFO FROM ME
      @revkev
      @TSauer
      @PAgolfer2017
      @mr.hicksta
       
       
      Sit Down This is A Big One!! 
      What's your most effective club after your last iron and before your driver, 4-hybrid, 5 wood,  utility iron?  And how does that club fit with the rest of your clubs in that gap?  Were you fit for it?  Well according to the people I met with at PING at the PGA Show, most golfers don't pay as much attention to this area as they pay to the driver, irons and putter. Sure it may not be as thrilling as a driver fitting, and being covered up with head covers they may not bring the attention to your bag that shiny new irons do.  But properly fit and gapped, they absolutely will save strokes in your long game. 

       
      So we are looking for four testers to join myself in putting the latest line of PING G410 fairway-woods/hybrids/crossovers to test to see how they help improve your long game.  Which clubs will you be testing?  Well that's where part of the real fun comes in. Once selected, the testers will be set up with a FREE fitting by the local rep or an authorized top fitter in the area, for the gap between driver and irons.  When the fitter has determined the setup those specs will be sent to PING and you will receive the clubs to test/review and keep. 
      It's imperative that anyone that applies for this testing, understands and agrees that they will receive exactly what the fitter recommends, and not what you think you'd prefer or think you'd be more comfortable with. If you're not willing to put your trust in the hands of professional fitters, than this testing isn't for you. So put all egos aside and go into the fitting open minded. I know I did exactly that and was quite surprised and even more pleased at the results. I'll share my experiences and setup once the testing has begun. 
       
       
       

       
      Also just want everyone to know, while the recent partnership announcement between PING and Arccos is very exciting, they will not be an option for this this testing.  
      How to apply.
      This is important, so please follow these instructions carefully:

      1. If you haven't already, make sure you're a registered MyGolfSpy Forum member
      2. In this thread (and ONLY in this thread - please don't go back to the blog and apply - it won't do you any good!), tell us the following:

      - Your first name
      - City/State  
      - Your swing speed and handicap
      - Your current setup of FW/Hybrid/Utility,....for example:   17* Utility iron, 5 wood, 4 hybrid
      Right Hand or Left Hand


      This review opportunity is open to any golfer who resides in the US (due to fitting logistics).  We'll be announcing the testers in this thread next week, so make sure to check back. 

      Please do not 'quote' this post when applying...
       

       
    • By GregB135
      Spent a couple of hours this afternoon at the Tampa Bay Golffest event. A really nice though not especially large demo day event hosted by Tampa Bay Downs. Had a chance to hit some of the new offerings out there in the marketplace and some potential GolfSpy test candidates. 
      Hit several drivers. The new Mizuno ST, Ping G410, Wilson Cortex, and Cobra F9 Speedback. Keeping in mind it wasn't full fitting for each, but the reps did ask enough questions to get you close enough spec wise so you were hitting something close to your current gamer. Of the 4, my least favorite was the Mizuno, it just didn't have the same feel as the others. The Ping G410 just felt AWESOME. The Cobra felt good, like the ball was exploding off the face, but the ball flight was a little higher than my preference, and the ball was airborne for.....ever. The Cortex was a surprise. Felt good and solid, sound and ball flight were right there with all the others. I hit a smattering of irons, but wasn't focused enough on those to include data. The latest of the Mizuno JPX forged though was a very solid feeling club. In any case, I didn't put anything back on the rack thinking "boy that sucked" so be encouraged GolfSpy universe, there is some really good equipment coming out this year.
      Also spied some of the new Bridgestone e12 golf balls in the sale tent. I'm sure we are all waiting for the revelation of those testers (my fingers are crossed).
      Last, I got some Trackman style feedback on the effectiveness of the SuperSpeed training system (about to start week 9 for me). Participating in the skills contests, included 4 Trackman assessed shots with driver. With a mis-fit glove, no warm-up, no golf shoes, and a random selection of not my drivers to choose from, I got all 4 swings onto the grid with 3 going past 270 at 100mph. About a 15-20 yard gain from last season!! Still waiting on the promised email with the Trackman video/data and pro comparison.
      A pretty cool afternoon.

    • By WhiskeyBanjo
      Just trying to get back into the game.   Been away for a few years.    Hope for good convo and tips.
       
      Thanks guys,
      WB
    • By jlukes
      https://mygolfspy.com/2019-taylormade-m5-m6-drivers-fairways-hybrids/

      Please use this thread for all discussion, impressions and reviews of these clubs
  • Recent Topics

  • Latest from the Blog

  • Happy Birthday Today!

×
×
  • Create New...