Jump to content
MattF

Shaft aligning, is it for me?

Recommended Posts

My question is this: adjustable hosels, the spine will be all over the place as one changes the orientation of the shaft for fade/draw/loft, correct?

If so, why do it with a driver shaft, or any other one that will be rotated?

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Well if you're fit for a driver and shaft, would you really be messing with the settings afterwards?

 

You're exactly right, it'd be a waste of money if you do play with the settings after having your shaft spined

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So according to Modern Golf (this may be specific to the 917D3, not sure) I can adjust my driver in one of the four settings as long as I don't change the number. So for example I have mine set to D1 right now. As long as I operate within A1/B1/C1/D1 it won't effect the spine of the shaft. If I would leave that setup, it will effect it and that is where the offer to pure the shaft for me again would come in.

 

Here is the SureFit chart for reference.

 

DY34Url.jpg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

People I really trust since I know them are True Spec and Modern Golf. Their business ethics are beyond reproach and would not do it for money alone. Hoyt is well connected on the Tour scene and does plenty of Tour players, Justin Rose and Gary Woodland (that I know of) and a bunch of LPGA girls and then top college players and then people like me, just out for fun. Like others have mentioned (as I have no axe to grind here) whatever makes you think you've covered all the bases off, then I think that is great. For me, it all goes back to having my things dialed in as much as possible for me and I think the puring process is a part of it. 

Years ago the owner of SST (Dick Weiss) sent me their hat to wear. Funny thing I got stopped by a Police Officer as he only saw the SST Pure and not the rest. He thought I was promoting something else :)

Pure Hat.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well if you're fit for a driver and shaft, would you really be messing with the settings afterwards?

 

You're exactly right, it'd be a waste of money if you do play with the settings after having your shaft spined

In thinking back to my ECPC "fitting", yeah, I'd definitely be messing with the shaft!

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Even after a fitting that was professionally done and provided proof that a specific setting is the optimal choice for you?

 

That idea was always intriguing to me...

 

Sent from my Pixel XL using MyGolfSpy mobile app

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In thinking back to my ECPC "fitting", yeah, I'd definitely be messing with the shaft!

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

That wasn't a fitting.
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Even after a fitting that was professionally done and provided proof that a specific setting is the optimal choice for you?

 

That idea was always intriguing to me...

 

Sent from my Pixel XL using MyGolfSpy mobile app

See above. ^^^

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Even after a fitting that was professionally done and provided proof that a specific setting is the optimal choice for you?

 

That idea was always intriguing to me...

 

Sent from my Pixel XL using MyGolfSpy mobile app

There's a whole thread of answers, I'm sure, for what constitutes a TRUE fitting, so I'll keep this short: many demo days, brick and mortar stores, and OEM locations say they do "fittings"... Most I've gone to aren't TRUE fittings where one wouldn't need to touch their driver settings. That's why I asked the question about "puring" and making adjustments. By the way, Titleist is the only company who has done a true fitting at a demo day that I've participated in, where the shaft and all adjustments were completely done and I wouldn't have to mess with everything, but alas, this is for another thread.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ahhh!

 

You're talking about one of THOSE fittings. I know exactly what you mean and have been through a few myself.

 

I supposedly got crazy low numbers from an M1 combo fitting at a demo day. When I was at modern I tried to recreate that performance with the combo and couldn't come close. Not sure which was right or wrong, but it truly is amazing how much your expectations have to shift based on where you go/who you end up with. Sometimes it's just luck of the draw.

 

I've had fittings at golf Galaxy (both Edel fittings) and they are some of the best fittings I've ever experienced. I also had another fitting at golf Galaxy which led to me walking out with stock Nike equipment with no data to back up the performance and no help whatsoever from the fitter. Worst experience I've had!

 

Sent from my Pixel XL using MyGolfSpy mobile app

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

... I will add two things to this discussion. First, steel shafts were notoriously out of round. I had some dynamic gold shafts that bowed so much they could not roll on a concrete floor unless really pushed. There was an absolute need for puring imo so your set could have some consistency. Modern high end steel shafts are produced at a much tighter tolerance and I am not sure how much Puring will help. I have played granite in my irons for well over 10 years so I don't have a definitive position on current steel iron shafts.

... Secondly and most importantly, I spent some time with the VP of Engineering that developed the original NV and most of the other Aldila shafts and he says there is zero need for puring or floing wood shafts OR graphite iron shafts. In high speed photography, the very first pass of a shaft with a laser is always perfectly straight. Subsequent passes of poor quality shafts will begin to wobble and some very badly, but of course the ball is long gone after that very first pass so that is all that matters as far as performance is concerned. Quality is a different subject. But most modern graphite shafts are so close to perfectly round over their entire circumference is is useless to align them. After checking the flo on the Extreme NV I was playing at the time and having it straight line in every alignment as well as having virtually no spine, I have not fooled around with aligning any shaft since. 

... All that said, if I could get my steel iron shafts pure for free? Sure why not, but I wouldn't pay for it. But I would pass on aligning graphite shafts with logo's all over the place when it makes no difference according to one of the foremost experts in shaft design. 

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All shaft manufacturers, graphite especially, do a form of spine/flo. They do it to orient the graphics on the shaft. Check the butt of any new uncut graphite shaft. There will be a mark from the process, whether a cut notch or a grease pencil marking. Graphics will be oriented based upon that marking and how they choose to mark them

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


Announcements

×
×
  • Create New...