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Lonnie96

Increasing weight of club

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A little do it your self project here after trying a buddies set.He had a set that felt heavy to the extreme.His late father was a club fitter-successful golf tracher that believed in a heavy club versus a light one for his clients.

 

His son is a great golfer but never participated in learning his fathers craft of club fitting.Through a few sources I've acquired a lie /loft machine - measuring tools- and basic club fitting equipment and knowledge.I practiced on a demo club and took the swing weight of a 3 iron from d1 to a high e rating.Used tungsten powder mixed with fine course moist limestone near the tip of the shaft by the clubhead.I than corked and regripped.Club feels amazing.The moist limestone won't rust the shaft, and once settled it turns hard.

 

My question is what is the max weight a club can handle before it impacts a negative result to the sweet spot?My demo club is basically hook proof now.Which was a major swing flaw that I could never fix.This heavy weighted club towards the head fixed this issue for me.

 

What issues would I have doing this to a entire set? What effect would this plugging have on a graphite shaft stress wise ? What is the max weight before a shaft becomes stressed?

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It's not a great idea to use moist limestone in steel shafts. Limestone is naturally alkaline in it's properties and will cause rust, but if you combine it with two dissimilar metals you have effectively created electrolytic corrosion which will speed up the process.

Secondly, how much stress can you handle rather than the club? It is not a matter of club to shaft stress (we'll come to that later) but physically moving that amount of heft in the swing will have an impact on how well your body can cope with this. Moving several swing weight points heavier will create problems with shaft flex (it will become much weaker) and for graphite, it will introduce stress which could break the shaft.

How much that maximum weight is related to stress fracture, or indeed your personal physical capabilities is not exactly a finite figure, but anything outside which is considered the "norm" by fitting standards would need careful consideration before it can be attributed to any benefits.

As a general rule of thumb, club modification on any level should be the last resort to a swing flaw. If you have a tendency to hook for instance, that is usually the fault of the golfer - not the equipment. Fix the swing flaw before looking to alter any club component or specification. Certainly club tweaks and mods can be employed to compliment or enhance certain swing styles and tendencies, but they have never had the ability to "fix" a swing flaw.

Raw club weight and swing weight are two different things ultimately, but both units have their purpose in club fitting. If your swing style and technique dictates that you definitely don't need a heavier shaft or swingweight, then nothing whatsoever can be gained by using the kind of set up you are proposing.

My 2 cents.

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I love the heavy feel. And am hitting the ball the best I have ever hit a long iron. In my bench I received there is also metal shaft plugs that the previous owner used.Im also sure it is masking a swing flaw. I'm just amazed how I can swing so freely and it never over hooks. Distance loss is very minimal , but accuracy is just uncanny so far

 

Every golf club just feels like a feather to me. This new feel is so addictive.

 

Thanks for the response. Rookie at all of this

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Jaskanski sorta nailed it overall on my opinion. Weight and feel is a subjective thing. I have all the equipment but rarely swing weight my personal clubs. I will swing them and hit them on the range and add lead tape as I need it. But with all that being said I am strictly an old school feel player. One thing I can for some reason pick up on immediately is if a club has been shaft weighted in the hosel or slugged in the hosel as some of us old timers call it. Nothing wrong with that at all it just does not fly for me. I recently caught some flack at my club because I am playing a pristine set of Nicklaus Muirfield blades (see my signature) and have lead tape on the back. Like I told one of the guys they ain't worth a s**t to me if I can not hit them. I bought them to play with not look at. I have a couple of sets of irons to look at for display including a set of fully restored 1959 Macgregor MT-2s with the original shafts and leather grips. I also have a set of 1942 Armour with steel shafts that have the original steel shafts but not the original grips but I have played them in the past but they are rare so I retired them

 

IMHO it is ok to do whatever you like as far as weight distribution etc to make a club playable for you

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Driver Homna  G1- X Stock Homna Regular shaft

4 wood Adams Tight Lies 

20* Hybrid Adams Boxer Ozik Matrix R shaft

24* Hybrid Adams A 10-OS Pro Launch Red R

Irons 5 thru PW 1980 Macgregor VIP Hogan Apex #2 shafts

SW- Macgregor LRA 56* S-400

Putter 1997 Santa Fe rusty as heck

 

 

 

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Thanks stu. The ones I altered were D2 now F8.

 

Really fun working on your own clubs.

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Took them out for a round and it was fabulous. All tiny draws and no wild rights or lefts.For some reason, all the weight in the shaft allowed the toe to speed up and heel slow down. It's almost like they all have a tiny draw built in now.I don't understand how this happened.The draw was universal with every club I reworked in my bag

 

Next I'm going to use lead weights on the outside of the shaft and clubhead on my driver.I have special metal adhesive to hold it in place. I'm thinking i going to place all the weight on the sole

 

Again, brand new to this.But the massive weight increase gave me a tiny draw.And a feeling of the club starting down slower. Maybe beginners luck ? Or just where the weight settled down in the shaft.? I switched to play sand almost the whole shaft with 2) 14 gram lead weights bottom and 3) top

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Bought a set of hogan edge hybrids a few years back and the guy I got em from had put lead tape on them. It was stuck on pretty good so I just left it on. Have been crushing these clubs since I got em and don't think I can ever give them up now.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using MyGolfSpy mobile app

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Lead tape is the best way to get it right, if your in the general feel ball park.

 

I agree that putting weight in the hosel just feels weird.

 

I get my swing weight where I want it than I use self-stick tape and wrap it around just below the grip. When I re-grip, if I still have the club, I move it up a tad and put grip over it.

 

When I sell it, take off the lead on the head and grip and no issues.

 

Lead tape rules.

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IMG_5288.JPGi use this.Lead weight rolls are so over priced.And I believe a marketing golf scam in the industry.Can get a whole box of these for $10.Can mold these / bend and melt down.My clubs feel so solid now.Putting weight in the hosel made them right proof.Next i will mold a few to fit down graphite shafts.

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