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Fresh from the Inbox - Swing Oil

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 What the what?

 

Like many of you, I have a certain connotation with the term “swing oil” – and it has nothing to do with Glucosamine or Turmeric. But you've probably seen this product popping up in banner ads or advertisements featuring Jason Day.

 

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Essentially, each pack of Swing Oil is a 3 oz. serving (Lemon-Lime, Strawberry-Banana, Orange) containing 7 primary ingredients, each with a different purpose.  The purported benefits are Increased focused and energy and decreased inflammation and recovery time. It's a pretty simple platform, but it's unique in that it targets all of this with one product.

 

Does it work? 

 

I tried it and I liked it, but as always, you're mileage may vary – largely depending on what you currently do for nutrition during a round and whether or not Swing Oil provides something which would actually help you.

I didn't notice anything super-natural or other worldly, but I wasn't hungry or lacking for energy during my several rounds. I took one dose at the range before I tee'd off, one at the turn and one on the way home. I'd have to play a lot more (and in different situations – tournament play in particular) to see if this is something I'd invest in (if you buy in bulk you'll spend a bit over $2.50/serving).

 

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Typically, if people can't get over how something tastes (or the texture of it) it doesn't matter what it might be able to do. Because energy drinks and similar products have been around for a while, most people aren't expecting a product like this to taste like lemonade or your favorite strawberry smoothie – but it isn't far off. Actually, my favorite way to consume Swing Oil was by leaving them in my freezer and tossing a couple in my bag on the way to the course. Instant slushy magic.

 

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Admittedly, I tend to be more of Diet Coke, water and Cliff Bar guy, but I would certainly be willing to give this product a more extended trial run and see if it's something to which I could commit long term.

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If you believe it will help..then it probably will. Placebo effect. But 11 g of sugar... Hydration and proper nutrition would be the way to go for ones health.

 

Sent from my SM-N910W8 using MyGolfSpy mobile app

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I've never been one to hold much credence in things like Gatorade, or sports drinks/foods in general. I was involved in competitive martial arts for 20 years. I found that good old water and a banana did the trick. I did the same when I took up cycling (non competitive). All I carried was two water bottles filled with water, a banana and sometimes a high carb bar of some sort.

 

No need to spend so much money on "magic" drink/food. Just my .02 for what it's worth.

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Here's the deal with every supplement out there...

 

It's not regulated by the USDA. 

 

The manufacturer could tell you anything they want and no one will hold them to it. Granted, there are a few groups out there that sport organizations rely on to certify supplement nutrition labels, but most of these items can be found in natural foods. And anything that's an 'extract' should call in to question as to the quality of the extract. 

 

As far as the gatorade comment goes, a sports drink is in fact proven by registered dietitians and sport scientists to have an effect on ones workout IF the workout is over an hour long. Yes, Gatorade's electrolytes are simply water, sodium and potassium and yes, a banana, some salty snacks and water could do the trick, but sports drinks are beneficial if the workout calls for it. People who drink Gatorade because they broke a sweat mowing the lawn or ran for 15 minutes on the treadmill are just filling their bodies with unnecessary stuff. 

 

Natural foods that help with joint mobility: High in omega-3s (salmon, tuna, walnuts, flax seeds), or apples, almonds, or pineapple all have natural components to help joint mobility and repair. 

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I used to drink a chocolate flavored - powered sport recovery drink after playing a round. I can't recall the name or brand but you'd probably recognize it. Anyway... I haven't bought anymore of it in a while but I thought it seemed to work as far as easing post golf muscle soreness. I don't have any joint or mobility issues so I wasn't looking for relief in that regard. I just followed the directions and would drink the stuff within 30 minutes of finishing my round. I think it helped. Perhaps I'll try it again??

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