Jump to content
JBones

OFFICIAL FORUM MEMBER REVIEW - SHOT SCOPE

Recommended Posts

Shot-Scope-8.jpg

 

 

 

OFFICIAL SHOT SCOPE REVIEW

 

 

 

 

 

Kanoito             - Stage 1 - Stage 2 - Stage 3

 

Evershady        - Stage 1 - Stage 2 - Stage 3

 

Orange Hog      - Stage 1 - Stage 2 - Stage 3

 

Downlowkey     - Stage 1 - Stage 2 - Stage 3

 

 

 

Visit Shot Scopes website HERE
Visit Shot Scopes Facebook HERE
Visit Shot Scopes Twitter HERE
Visit Shot Scopes Instagram HERE 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stage Two

Player Biography

The most important parts of my golf game were covered in Part 1, but you are free to shoot any questions you might still have.

I'm an impatient golfer, I hate anything that goes beyond 4.5 hours (in a foursome). I don't even stop to clean my clubs after a shot. I use my rock-hard beer abs to push my Clicgear and clean it while walking to my ball. I only use 2 mins to search for my own ball and will only invest as much time to look for yours. You get the picture. So I'm always willing to try new gadgets as long as they don't interfere with pace of play.

Go big or go home. That's how I like to play my rounds, always going for the shot with the highest risk/reward. Yes, this is totally not how course management should work, but the different challenges keep it fun and interesting for me.

I like to describe myself as a tech-savvy person, which involves soldering broken transistors on a PC motherboard, programming in Java, modifying apps for Android and tinkering with any gadget I'm able to get my hands on.

Why is this relevant? So you can have an idea how easy/difficult something really is based on your technical know-how.

Performance

Product setup

Installation was a breeze (almost idiot-proof). It took about 30 seconds to read the manual as everything was described clearly.

First thing I did was to charge the wristband. I usually try to use the same USB compliant charger for all my devices: phone, tablets, GPS watch, etc. and leave the new ones in their box as this helps to unclutter my desk. When I tried to charge the Shot Scope, the LED wouldn't blink at first. Upon closer examination, I realized my phone charger was too shallow and it wouldn't insert completely due to the rubber cap that protects the charging port when not in use.

port800.jpg

I then used the USB cable that came with the Shot Scope and it started charging without issues. This is not a problem, but perhaps worth mentioning. As you can see in the photo, this one is much deeper and can bypass the rubber cap obstruction.

connector800.jpg

However, I think certain users would appreciate having the USB wall adapter that is not included. For people who do not have this kind of charger (because they don't use a smartphone or whatever reason), their only option would be to charge it using a computer. Yes, modern computers offer a powered USB port that functions even when the PC is off, but if you don't have one of these, then you'll have to turn on your PC and leave it on for 2-3 hours to charge the device. Using a smartphone is optional, as you can also upload your round data to the PC directly.

Shot Scope suggests about 2 hours, I left it overnight. The blue LED's will blink while charging and remain on when the battery is full. In the meantime, I downloaded and installed the mobile app from Google Play.

The tag installation process is pretty straightforward: rotate clockwise with a little downward push. However when I asked my wife to help me install them, she said her hands hurt a little after 2-3 tags. So just a heads-up to our female golfers or gentlemen with delicate hands ;)

Hold the power button for 3 seconds and it will start searching for GPS satellites (5 LED's blinking). Once GPS has been fixed, you'll only see 1 solid LED lit. So it's recommended to turn it on a few minutes before your tee time. I then proceeded to press the Bluetooth button (hold for 3 seconds), turned on Bluetooth and location on my phone, fired up the app and pressed Connect. Voila

phoneconnect800.jpg

Overall, the set-up was a walk in the park. I'll only deduct 1 point for the missing wall charger.

Setup Score: 9 out of 10 points

Performance on the Course

New toy is ready to go, time to take it for a spin!

As suggested, I turned it on about 10 mins before tee off. The LED stopped blinking which signaled a GPS fix.

I usually play without a watch, because I sweat a lot and it sticks to my skin. It's still winter over this part of the world, so that was not an issue. I barely noticed I had something on my wrist.

However, my first complaint came on the first tee. I was trying to put my glove on (left hand) and the wristband was kind of in the way. I then thought about switching it to my right wrist and then I remembered somewhere in the manual mentioned you had to change the setting for a left-handed golfer. During winter, I only take off my gloves to putt (during summer, I take off after every shot), so it was bearable. When I got home, I decided to email the good folks at Shot Scope and asked them if there would be any problems wearing the watch on the right hand. The reply came promptly:

 

I thought about different methods to make it more comfortable, such as wearing it on the right hand with right hand settings or right hand with left hand settings. In both cases the tag would eventually go out of range (due to the right hand being further away from the tag) and you are risking a misread.

So if the wristband is interfering with your glove, wear it on the appropriate hand and just loosen it a little bit. Since the strap is made of rubber, it won't be sliding up your arm/out of range during your swing and you can easily move it when putting on your glove.

You'll need between 7 to 10cm for the tag to be detected

wristbandtag800.jpg

The whole system is automatic. Play golf like you normally would and just do the pin collection after you hole out. This function is extremely intuitive, so if you can count up to 4, then you won't have problems with it. I'm sure most people will forget to pin collect during their first 3 rounds, but once the muscle memory sets in, it shouldn't be an issue. And if by any chance you need a button that registers more than 4 putts… well, you can go edit your round or get a couple of putting lessons ;)The reason the wristband is worn on the left wrist is due to the distance it is from the tag. The closer the wristband is to the tag the more accurate the data. Wearing the wristband on the right wrist will cause data to be less accurate and there is a potential for shots to be missed.

 

Results

Round 1: Gut Kaden A + B

I played 18 holes, keeping score on paper in order to compare results later on. One of the first rounds of the season, cold day (5C ~ 41F), greens aerated, you get the picture… not the best scoring conditions, so I was satisfied with a 90. All distances are in meters, so you can roughly add 10% for the yardage

round1800.jpg

About 80% of the shots registered by Shot Scope were correct. About 5% were completely bogus such as shots from the cart path or 2 shots within 5m of each other (I swear I didn't chunk it). The final 10% were shots that were not registered. Interesting enough, the missing shots were always tee shots. Now, it was my first time using the Shot Scope and I forgot to pin collect almost every hole. So I suspect the wristband was somehow expecting a trigger to finish a hole and it never came. But hey, this is due to my own stupidity… I'm sure it'll get better in the next few rounds.

That's it! Play golf and push a button after every hole… it's that simple! The only thing you have to keep track of are penalties. Since Shot Scope traces your shots based on where you are standing, it is impossible for it to tell the difference between a legit 3rd shot you laid-up before the water hazard and a 4th shot because you failed miserably to reach the green in 2.

How accurate was the distance? If I looked at the distance of each tee shot separately (on the scorecard), I would say it's way off. 200m off the tee? Preposterous! I average 300m!!! *rolleyes*

shortdrive800.jpg

But then you consider elevation, terrain, cold weather, linear distance, wind, your constant duck hooks, your manly ego and suddenly... it doesn't look that bad.

Just to be really sure there was nothing wrong with the distances, I went over all my approach shots and they were close to my lasered numbers and the clubs I would usually hit from that distance. Here an 8i 145 yards into the wind.

approach8i800.jpg

Round 2: Gut Waldhof 18 holes

Went back to play 18 on my old course hoping the problems I faced in Round 1 weren't course-related. Second attempt to make Shot Scope work, no problems at all! Look at me shooting 25 at the back nine. I didn't play the last 3 holes due to a storm approaching

round2800.jpg

Round 3: Gut Kaden C + A

Back to my new home course, where I had trouble the first time. Remembered to pin collect after every whole, avoided anything that could cause a misread (drag the club on the wet rough with my glove hand, etc.). There was no need to edit at all, perfect! Shot a 90 with 5 double bogeys.

round3800.jpg

Round 4: Gut Kaden C + A

Final round before posting Stage 2 of this review. Not my best day. I forgot about 3-4 pin collects, so they weren't displayed properly on the map (my own fault), so I edited them. On A1, Shot Scope placed me on the fairway, but I was actually 1m into the fairway bunker. I guess it's still within the GPS tolerance specs, so not much you can do there. You'll notice 2 empty holes, I did play them, lost about 6 balls so I probably carded a 10-12 on each, but since I was too frustrated to keep score, I deleted the traces only to keep the accurate ones in the round

round4800.jpg

Performance Summary

The good:

+Shot Scope is extremely easy to use and non-disruptive, the only time I noticed it on  my wrist was when a) I was putting my glove back on and B) to pin collect

+This device completely fulfilled my expectations on the course, as it worked exactly the way I had imagined it would

+Accuracy far as I could verify was spot on (with laser range finder and with the usual approach clubs)

+The convenience offered by the Shot Scope is second to none. I can't imagine myself going back to the hassle of handheld devices. Besides the pin collect button press, you literally have to do nothing during the round

 

The bad:

-5% bogus shots from Round 1: I contacted Shot Scope to understand what may be causing a read on a car path. Again, their excellent customer service replied within 15 minutes and confirmed that a bumpy carth path could be the reason for that, but the wristband and tags would have to be very close to each other. Or if you start walking and cleaning the club with the wet rough while holding it with your sensor hand

-10% missed shots from Round 1: I paid special attention to pin collect in Round 2, 3 and 4 and the issue was solved

-After reading the initial difficulties some testers ran into, the device sometimes left me wondering if it captured the shot successfully. As it stands right now, you have to trust it and let it do its work. This could be avoided by implementing some sort of visual confirmation (LED blink or LED color change) after every registered shot

-The whole shot tracing process is pretty much automatic. Wouldn't it be possible to make the putting automatic too? The putter has a tag, so it knows how many putts you've taken. Instead of finishing a hole with pin collect, the algorithm could be something like “calculate # of putts based on number of putts registered after hitting another club (next tee shot) in a range > 10m outside the green. Then you eliminate players who forget to press the button

-I personally don't mind the current design, but I'm sure a sleeker, more stylish construction would sell to a bigger audience

I am deducting a total of 3 points in the performance part: 1 for the lack of feedback after a successful shot registration, 1 for the lack of automated putt calculation and 1 for the bogus shots that are still unexplainable until now. The last issue should have a deeper impact in the performance scale, but I would like to attribute it to a first-timer kind of phenomenon. Rounds 2-4 didn't show those annoyances and were captured flawlessly.

Course Score: 37 out of 40 points

Post Round

Editing

Once you are done with the round, you can either pair the device and look at everything on the phone while it's fresh or wait til you get home and analyze it all on a big monitor. Sync methods are via Bluetooth to your mobile app (also accessible on the PC dashboard) or using the USB cable to upload it to a PC directly.

The PC software you can download can only be used to upload data, change hand settings and reset to factory defaults. The editing is still done via the web dashboard

desktopapp.jpg

The only time shots were missed were during Round 1 (see Performance on the Course part). Editing is pretty straight-forward and intuitive. Click on your scorecard, “Edit" button, select which hole, you can drag and drop the shot location on the map (based on Google maps) and use the drop-down menu to select the club you used or alternatively add a penalty shot. Once you are done “Save/Exit”.

edit800.jpg

Editing under the dashboard is a painless and quick process. Assuming your shots were all captured correctly, you'll only need about 15 secs / hole to add a penalty shot.

One thing I loved was how easy it was to adjust the location on the map. Distance is then automatically recalculated with the new coordinates. This feature is useful in situations where can't hit from the usual spots, due to ground under repair, new tee boxes, etc.

The mobile app, besides functioning as a sync interface for your round data, it also serves as a portable viewer for your round details and performance statistics. You cannot edit your round via mobile app. That's fine since I prefer working with a full-sized monitor, keyboard and mouse.

mobileapp.jpg

mobileround.jpg


So now to the bugs/suggestions:

1) My course has 27 holes (A, B and C). The first round I played was A + B. Shot Scope dashboard was showing me course C. I emailed their support team and the issue was resolved within 1 hour

2) For some reason, my Shot Scope created a new scorecard and registered 1 single shot in addition to the correct round. I then proceeded to delete the bogus one from my PC, but to my surprise, the false round wouldn't disappear from my mobile app. New rounds were added properly, but the deleted rounds were still visible. I looked everywhere, pulled down to sync several times, but nothing happened

Then one day, after logging out by mistake, I went back in and it was fixed. I'm guessing a logout will trigger a more complete sync process than just refreshing

3) I also noticed that on the mobile app, even though the scorecard only has 9 holes, it will allow you to scroll from 10 to 18 using hole 9 data. This is probably a bug that's not too difficult to solve

4) While waiting for the Shot Scope to arrive, I went to their website to check if my home course had already been mapped. Unfortunately, the information was nowhere to be found. When you buy a GPS device that advertises 30.000 courses world wide, you want to make sure yours is in there. No big deal, but it shouldn't be difficult to maintain a list with mapped courses

5) I recently got a JetSpeed 5W to replace my Adams 3H. There are no tags for a 5W so you can only use the spare X tags. This shows as Club1 on my dashboard. Imagine if you had an unconventional bag set-up and you have to use all 4 X tags. You would have to keep track of which club is being represented by that X. The easier solution would be to allow the user to modify the club name, so instead of Club1 I can rename it 5 Wood

customclub800jpg.jpg

6) I played Round 2 on my old course, which is a standard 18 hole facility. The Shot Scope dashboard shows both the front and back nine as a whole. On the current course (3 x 9 holes) it treats them separately, thus only expanding the 9 holes I'm currently viewing. I would prefer if the dashboard can show me both 9 holes simultaneously (check if they are played the same day within 3 hours of each other, then count it as 18). Just a small annoyance

7) I would also like a “rotate” function on the map. You can do that Google maps, so not sure if there is any kind of technical limitation. It's much easier to visualize the shots when standing on the tee box

8) Something I feel it's missing is the ability to share a round with a friend. FB and Twitter buttons are there, but didn't work for me. If, by any chance, I happen to break 80, I would like to share the good news with the rest of the world. But just posting on FB and saying "hey… I broke 80" doesn't have the fireworks effect, does it? Ideally you could create a temporary or private link (only people with the URL can access it) to that specific round. They can view the scorecard, detailed club selection and distances and zoom into the interactive map. This would be read-only to avoid any modifications by mistake. I know GolfShot GPS has a similar function to share scorecards

Performance/Statistics

Now comes the fun part with all the numbers and graphs. The main page of the dashboard will provide you the “basic” stuff. These are the stats that we all know: average scores vs Par (on Par 3, 4 and 5), FIR, GIR, Scrambling % and average putts per hole. I think any golfer who takes his/her game seriously knows these figures or at least knows what they represent.

Shot Scope takes all this information and cranks it up a bit -> performance!

It is a detailed info panel that shows:

Distance and Usage of each club. You can view the numbers as average, performance average (which excludes outliers) and longest. The “Custom” club is my 5W (please refer to complaint #5)

 

clubs.JPG
 

Tee shots, which covers distances and accuracy. In this case, it tells me something I already know, I'm pulling all my drives, but nailing my 3W. Why not use my 3W on every hole? Because I'm stubborn.

tee shots.JPG

 

You also have details to your approach shots, which not only covers GIR, but also takes all attempts on the green into consideration.

approach.JPG

And your shot game stats that shows everything around the green, distance to the pin and scramble %.

short game.JPG

Putting stats as desired: average, off the green, average 3 putts, make percentage depending on distance, you name it!

putting.JPG

And finally, personal records just for bragging rights.

record.JPG

Post Round Summary

Shot Scope provides a complete tool to analyze all different aspects of your game. If you are serious about improving, you will find the answers. I only had 4 rounds in the system, so the sample pool wasn't big enough. But I'm sure by the end of the season I'll be getting normalized numbers.

The 3 points I am deducting are due to the bugs or missing features. They are nice-to-have, but not a deal-breaker. And I'm sure the folks at Shot Scope can solve/implement them easily.

Editing Score: 12 out of 15 points

Subjective

Looks

Rectangular shaped, sporty wrist-band, made of plastic, paired with rubber straps. Its main function it to act as a receiver for the tags, so obviously it doesn't need a display. Even if it did, I doubt you would be able to squeeze that many details into such a tiny screen.

This is no fashion accessory, so if you need the bling bling and glossy piano finish, you'll have to look somewhere else. It doesn't have the “premium” feel of an Android/Apple Watch, but it's not a deal breaker for me. Let's face it, you should be focusing on your game and not on how many compliments you catch for the new toy. The only time you'll interact with the device is to record the number of putts after each hole. Buttons are easy to press and offer good haptic feedback.

smartwatches.jpg

The bright blue LED's give the otherwise monotonous black plastic a little bit of flare and modern feel. My flight partners only started noticing the wristband after I activated the putt collection.

led800.jpg

Something that caught my attention was the number of pins used in the strap. A total of 4 pins are used to keep the wristband from falling. Makes me wonder if they had any initial issues with the watch falling off, so they decided to reinforce it. This is a design I haven't seen in other similar gadgets (GPS watches) but it doesn't make wearing it any more difficult.

pin800.jpg

The tags, once installed, went completely unnoticed for me

tags800.jpg

Looking at the current offerings, the Shot Scope falls somewhere between a traditional GPS watch and a modern smartwatch. I'll deduct 1 point for not looking more state-of-the-artsy.

Looks Score: 14 of 15 points

Likelihood of Purchase

 

If you had asked me a couple of years ago, when only Game Golf or Arccos were out, I probably would have said no way, Jose!
But after using Shot Scope and seeing all data available to you and the stupid-easy operating mode, spending GBP 185 (minus the 15% discount for Easter) for your personal on-course butler seems like a no-brainer.

Think of it as a personal assistant who walks 18 holes with you, notes every shot, every putt on your birdie book, then transfers the data to a computer and crunches some numbers, makes some spreadsheets… you get the idea… to finally offer you a 20 page presentation of the current status of your game. If you ask me, that's value and all for a one-time fee!

I would give it a 20 out of 20 if the putting part could be automated as well and if there was some sort of audiovisual confirmation after each registered shot.

LOP Score: 18 of 20 points

Subjective Summary

 

A simple and sporty design. It may not win a beauty contest and may not satisfy the fashionistas in need of eye-candy, but it fulfills its purpose: provide accurate shot tracking capabilities that can be synthesized in an effective, user-friendly analysis tool.
 

Total Score: 90 of 100 points

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stage Three

 

1. Will this product go in your bag? Why or why not?
Yes, it will, especially for practice rounds, where I'm too lazy to keep score. This nifty little gadget can do it for me.
Charge it once after every 2 rounds and it's not very different than the maintenance you give a GPS watch.

 

2. To whom, if anyone, would you recommend this product? Why?
I think it will suit most recreational golfers. It keeps your score well enough (provided you remember to pin collect, etc.) and provides stats clear enough to help you improve. But it might not be enough for really good players who require tour-level accuracy.

 

3. How, if at all, did this product change your overall impression of Shot Scope?
I had never heard of them before, not even an ad on TV. But they delivered a good product for the average Joe, combined with superb customer service, which left an overall positive impression of this company. Look forward to the next iteration of the Shot Scope and all the improvements it can bring.

 

4. What feature would you change or eliminate from the next generation of this model?
Please refer to Stage 2 details
Update on 5/6: if it's chilly outside and you are wearing long sleeves, it will definitely get in the way between your shirt and the gloves. So I really hope in their next iteration you can freely choose which hand you wear the wristband on.

 

5. What feature do you really like, and would most like to see continued or evolved in future models
Please refer to Stage 2 details

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am excited to be chosen to test the Shot Scope. I was a little hesitant to commit to trying the Shot Scope because I don't wear a watch; mainly because I want my arms to weigh the same (Thank you Mitch). But I really want to find out where I am actually hitting the ball. I have tried Game Golf, but always forgot to Tag my clubs so I stopped using it. Hopefully this automatic tagging Shot Scope system will work out better.

 

A bit about me, last year I got a full new bag of gear that I am trying to work out. I was on Season 3 of Hack To Jack and we all received a full bag of Wilson Staff. I am extremely happy with the irons FG Tour V4's they are excellent. Currently in the bag are 2I Utility and 3I-PW. I am also really enjoying the FG Tour PMP Wedges 52* bent to 51* and 56* with the blue finish, great looking and great preforming wedges.  The FG Tour F5 3w is pretty good although quite a bit shorter than my old Anser. With the jury still out on FG Tour F5 Driver, I am thinking about possibly moving to a two 3 wood setup with my trusty Anser set to 14* as the Driver and the Wilson set at 16*. I will also have to test the King LTD Pro, and my Ping Anser Driver as well to see which bag setup gives me the best distance with most reliability of finding fairways.  With the Shot Scope I really hope to find out if my distances are what I think they are, and where I am struggling so I can work on those parts of my game more. It's early in the season up here in Wisconsin, but I'm excited to have a new toy to test for the beginning of the year.

 

Bag.jpg

 

Now onto the Questions.

  • Handicap? Currently at a 10 and working to drop it even more.
  • Strengths of my game? My main strength has always been distance; my driver swing speed can touch 130 MPH with my 7 Iron running in the 105 MPH range. I have 5 clubs in my bag that have a longer carry than average amateur players drive.
  • Weakness? Accuracy and Putting. I have improved on putting but still averaging close to 2 per hole.
  • Typical ball flight? High, I can hit every club High. Working on hitting the lower shots that come in handy in the wind.
  • My miss? Is usually a slice that comes with the power shot or the over the top pull.
  • What kind of golfer am I?  I'm the Tin Cup type. I know I can pull off any shot, but not always the safest or smartest play. Occasionally I pull it off, more often than not I fail and my round goes down in flames. This is also one of the main things I am working on correcting but it's just so hard to play the smart safe shot instead of going for it.

Shot Scope 1.jpg

Shot Scope 2.jpg

Shot Scope 3.jpg

 

First impression is it's not a bad looking gizmo. Nice magnetic box, little lack bag for the tags. 20 tags so you have plenty of extra and can have clubs to swap out like extra drivers or hybrids. The wrist unit seems a little big, but we will see how it feels during the round. It has a rubber wrist band with plastic connectors and a plastic locker, hopefully those hold up locker seems like a nice touch. Instructions simple hold button turn on, screw tags into clubs, go play. It has 5 buttons, one each for putts up to 4 and the power for zero should make keeping track of putts easy.   I'm ready to play.

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

[shot Scope] – Official MGS Forum Review by [Evershady (Robert Bazal]

 

Player Biography

I will start the review by saying that the Wilson woods only lasted a few rounds in the bag. I put the LTD in play as a custom tag but in my last few rounds have switched it to the driver tag after I changed the shaft to a Grafalloy Blue. The Wilson 3w I liked but my Anser is my go to club.  I did do some experimenting with both 3w's; Anser as a driver and with the Wilson cranked all the way up as the gap filler between Anser and 2I, but settled on Cobra, Anser in the bag.

I really wanted to test the Shot Scope to see if I had a consistent miss. I also wanted to track my club distances to see if the distance I thought I was hitting my clubs is that actual distance I am hitting my clubs. I know I am long off the tee, but I'm not sure what my average actually is and could I save shots knowing what clubs I consistently swing better than others.

 

I will state that my first few rounds with the Shot Scope did not go well at all. Most of my shots were not picked up and I had to edit almost every single shot on the course. I contacted Gavin and the customer service was great. They had me try a few things my next round and determined my wrist devise was defective and sent a new one out right away. I will do the review on the new device not the defective one.

Wilson14.jpgSHOT4.png

Performance

Performance for a GPS device is split into two categories.  Setup and use on the course.  During setup how easy was it?  Did you run into any issues?  Did you need to look for help online or in the manual?  On the course was the use intuitive?  Did it interfere with your game or pre-shot routines?  Did you have to think about it or was it just something there and you didn't even notice it?

Product setup

Setup was a breeze. I barely looked at the instructions. Tags go into the grip of the club and Shot Scope goes on the wrist, easy peasy. I did check how to download the app for phone and computer and then just did the normal setup to register. I also checked how to connect to my phone hold down button 1. All the instructions and actions are simple and I believe most people who would be interested in purchasing a device like this will have no problems setting it up. The only issue I had was when adding my tags, they all come in a bag which is nice, but you have to look through each one to find your clubs. This wasn't a big deal, but I was using two woods at the time.  Anser as 3w and Wilson as 5w and when I looked at the data I did not have a 5w, it was a SW. So easy fix, put the SW in my 56 and I was done. Personally, I wouldn't mind if each one of the tags had the club name in color. White, Red anything to make them a little easier to read.

 

Setup Score: (9 out of 10 points)

 

Performance on the Course

As for on the course that is where this baby really shines. At my home course of Lake Wissota I only need to turn it on 20 seconds before my first tee and it finds the Satalites almost instantly. I don't mind the pin collector button and find it rather easy to remember, but I have kept track of my putts for a long time as that is a weak spot in my game. Since getting the working unit I have only had a hand full of shots missed with most of those being tough position punch outs. Shots where you're on a tree and may or may not actually have the device near the tag. I did have a small issue my first time playing 18 at Wissota. And that is the hole 7 tee box and the hole 10 tee box are shared and go to opposite sides of a lake. Well the Shot Scope got confused. I let support and Gavin know and it was corrected in two days, with zero issues after. The other thing that I am happy with is the accuracy of the shot distance. After using my range finder and hitting a shot I find them to be pretty spot on. Although I'm not as happy with the putting distance and pin placement. A few times after a round I notice the pin is not as close to where it was when I hit the pin collect. Had a few occasions where the pin was off the green instead of near the middle.  I wasn't sure how I would like to wear something on my wrist as I don't wear a watch or any type of jewelry in my daily life let alone on the course. I was pleasantly surprised that I barely noticed it even through it looks large it is rather comfortable. One thing I would like added to the on the course function would just be when you take a drop if you could hit one of the buttons and the drop would come in right there. I also recently switched to a counter balance putter grip and was already aware the tag did not fit, but I just put the tag in my pocket and when I was putting slipped it into the band.

 

Course Score: ( 32 Out of 40 points) 3 points for pin collect off, 5 points for no drop feature

 

Performance Notes

I really like how the Shot Scope preforms there is almost nothing to do and that keeps your mind on golf. Sometimes it would be nice to see a live update of your score on your phone. Maybe a Shot Scope GPS App that interacts with the wrist device. Sometimes you don't want to wait till later to see how far that drive went. Over all I like how all you do is make sure its charged, if you have 40% battery you can get 18 holes in, and make sure it's on.

 

SHOT22.jpgSHOT21.jpgSHOT20.jpg

Post Round

Editing

Post round editing is easy for the most part. Just a few clicks. You do need to remember if you lost balls. I tend to hit a lot of balls in the water or OB and like I stated earlier, would much rather hit a button on the course than fix it later. Missed shots do happen occasionally, but I have only had one or two every few rounds so I don't find that to be all that important. But you also need to do the update quickly before you forget what happened during the round. You can only update using the computer.  If you were take a week-long golf vacation you might not remember all the shots at new/unfamiliar courses over multiple days. Post round editing should be done right away.

 

The information gathered is helpful and/or depressing because I noticed that I don't do anything well except hit the ball far. It does show me some things I really need to work on. For example, my up and down season average is only 20%, that is lousy. My par and par 5 scoring is about a half stoke over par with par 4's almost a full stoke over. 

 

One of the features I really like is the P-Average compare to overall Average. The P-Average is your average distance used when outliers are removed from the data. Where the Average uses every shot taken with that club. This should give you a better understanding of your true average on full swings. I like to use my 4 iron for punch shots and other recover shots that tend to be really short shots. This causes my overall average distance to drop to 148 yards, but my P-Average is 215 yards.  Without the P-Average I wouldn't know my true distance on a full swing.

Overall Average

SHOT12.jpgSHOT13.jpg

 

P-Average

SHOT14.jpgSHOT15.jpg

 

Longest

SHOT16.jpgSHOT17.jpg

 

 

The feature I would really like would be real time connection between your phone and the device could check you score after every hole and make your edits right on the course.

 

 

 

 

            Editing Score: (10 out of 15 points) 5 points off for having to use the computer to make all the edits.

 

Subjective

Looks

Watch:

The looks of the device are not bad, just a rather large rectangle watch. As I originally stated I'm not much of a fan of watches in my everyday life so it takes a little getting used to. I would prefer it was a bit smaller, but it isn't all that noticeable. I dig the color scheme, black and red always look nice, not as nice as say blue and orange but they go together nicely.

 

I liked the locking tabs for the strap for the end of the band. They kept the Shot Scope nice and close to where I placed it on my arm. The latch I thought could be a little better, just a plastic piece that clips onto the band pin. This piece can fall off rather easily. I did lose the one on mine and took the one off the non-working watch.

 

SHOT5.pngSHOT6.png

 

 

Tags:

The tags are like just about every other device in this category and were not noticeable at all after installation.

Describe the following:

·         This watch has more of a minimalist style and rectangle. Just a few buttons and some lights.

·         The Shot Scope really flows together nicely smooth and you can barely tell where the watch attaches to the band

·         Tags are simple plastic they do wear out a bit after banging around on the bottom of your bag, maybe if they could add some rubber around the outside to absorb some of the rubbing and wearing.

·         Comparing the Shot Scope to other products like Arrcos and Game Golf I believe they are all similar in what information you get and accuracy. Where the Shot Scope leads the way is you just put it on your wrist turn it on and play golf. Only work you have to do is remember to mark the pin location with your number of putts.

 

Looks Score: (12 Out of 15 points) I like the looks nothing to distract you while swinging just a little big for me.

 

Likelihood of Purchase

How likely would you be to purchase this product? I am very interested in the new V2 if they have corrected the things I mentioned in the review like marking on course penalties and making it easier to edit the round with a say a phone.

 

LOP Score: (17 Out of 20 points)

 

Subjective Notes

 

Questions & Answers.

I am going to skip the Q and A in my review mainly because I was a horrible tester this time around and took forever to get it done. I can come up with reasons for this that are a mile long,(like my wife and I bought our first house, our 4 year had surgery(tonsils), Beef invited me to the Open Championship, our 10 month old had surgery (ear tubes) all of these are true, but they are just excuses, and I should have made the time earlier to get it done. Finally, the review is complete. I would like to thank My Golf Spy and Shot Scope for giving me the opportunity and a whole lot of extra time for finish this.

 

 

Conclusion

In conclusion I really liked the Shot Scope, it gave me the information I was looking for. I learned what parts of my game need work. The part I didn't like was I learned my whole game sucks, outside of distance. SHOT7.jpgSHOT8.jpgSHOT18.jpgSHOT19.jpgSHOT9.jpgSHOT10.jpgSHOT11.jpg

 

 

The setup was super easy, the customer support was amazing. Use on the course was very easy as well, you could just play and let the Shot Scope do its job. Remembering to mark the pin location is the only thing you really need to worry about. I would really like a drop button to help keep track of penalties. On course updating would be helpful to keep from having to go back later to update. I am really looking forward to the V2 and if they have addressed my concerns then there is a good likely hood I would buy that one as well. I am also excited to have the yardages right on the watch.

 

 

 

Total Score: I ended with a final score of 80, 5-point deduction each for computer editing and no drop. All other deductions were minimal. I look forward to using the Shot Scope next year and to see if I can improve.

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stage Three

 

1. Will this product go in your bag? Why or why not?
Yes, I might not use it every round, but it is a good product that give good information. Also by switching around using it and not using it I can better determine if it has an effect on my game. 
 

2. To whom, if anyone, would you recommend this product? Why?
I believe most of my golf buddies would enjoy the Shot Scope. We are always trying to get better and this can help identify weak areas. 
 

3. How, if at all, did this product change your overall impression of Shot Scope?
I didn't know anything about the company or the product. They both seem to be legit. the devise works as well as any other and the customer support is just fantastic. They seem like they are working hard to improve the product as well which is a good sign of a quality company. 

 

4. What feature would you change or eliminate from the next generation of this model?
I would like to see a drop button added, and phone editing. I just think these would make editing much much easier. 
 

5. What feature do you really like, and would most like to see continued or evolved in future models
The best feature is that you really don't have to do much for it to keep track of your round. Just turn it on and remember to hit pin collect. If they could get it just a little smaller I think more golfer would really take a hard look at it. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

SHOT SCOPE PERFORMANCE TRACKING SYSTEM REVIEW - STAGE ONE

 

About Me

The first time I picked up a golf club was my Sophomore year in High School.  It was really more of a joke at the time and that exercise in goofing around evolved into a small group of us forming a golf team.  We weren’t very good, the shop teacher was our “coach” and none of us had any kind of money to put into proper equipment.  Nevertheless, it didn’t’ take long before I was hooked.  I continued to play periodically throughout my 20’s but got truly serious about developing my game about 6 or 7 years ago.  I invested in a rigorous lesson program with a teaching pro at Golf Tec, as well as getting fit for the appropriate equipment with a fitter at Club Champion.

 

Growing up I played a lot of team sports so I was always in this environment where we were collectively pushing each other to do our best.  Golf was so different for me coming from that environment, though, because it was just me against myself every time out on the course.  I love to play competitive golf and actively play between 10-12 amateur tournaments every year.  It drives me to focus on how to get better, where to push myself as I practice, how to attack a golf course and the ups and downs of winning and coming up short.  Despite the competitive nature I also enjoy the fun side of the game, especially sharing it with my two young children who love to go out and play with daddy as often as possible.  Golf has definitely made me a more humble person but it has also helped me appreciate the spoils that come from hard work, patience and preparation.

 

Because of the two young ones at home I don't get out as much as I'd like to but still get out enough to feed my love for the game.  Currently I practice once or twice a week at the range and typically play 18 holes Friday afternoon and a quick 9 holes early Saturday morning at a short executive track near my house.  As mentioned I compete in approx. a dozen competitive stroke play events during the year on the Golf Channel Am Tour.  I'm very fortunate in that both of my kids love to play golf with Dad.  Hopefully their interest remains so I have a couple of golf buddies soon!

 

Currently I'm playing off a 12 handicap and am really working on getting into the single digits this year.  My driver swing speed is 105 mph, though the driver is the most inconsistent part of my game.  Ball striking, particularly with my irons, is the strong side of my game followed by short game and putting.

 

What's In My Bag (current):

Driver - Cobra Fly Z | 9.5 degrees | Fujikura Pro 63 Tour Spec (plays 44")

Fairway Wood - Cobra F7 | Fujikura Pro 65

Hybrid - Cobra F7 | 19 degrees | Fujikura Pro 75

Irons - Cobra Fly Z+ (4-PW) | Aerotech Steelfiber i95 Stiff *

Wedges - Titleist Vokey | 50 F Grind | 54 M Grind | 58 TVD K Grind

Putter - Edel E-3 Custom

Ball - Taylormade TP5X

 

 

 

Unboxing and Initial Thoughts:

 

 

 

Additional Photos:

 

Comparison of the depth of the Shot Scope tag vs Game Golf tag

 

IMG_2747.jpg

 

Side-by-side size comparison of the Game Golf to Shot Scope

 

IMG_2746.jpg

 

Comparison of the Shot Scope to the watch I wear daily (Casio Pathfinder)

 

IMG_2743.jpg

 

IMG_2744.jpg

IMG_2745.jpg

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

SHOT SCOPE GPS PERFORMANCE DEVICE REVIEW -- STAGE 2

 

Player Biography

 

As mentioned in my Stage One I have been using the Game Golf performance-tracking tool for a little over 2 years now.  Being an analytical guy Game Golf has been a Godsend, as it allows me to really look into the numbers behind my game and figure out where my strengths and weaknesses are and dial up a game plan to work on fixing some of those weak areas.  Since I started getting data from Game Golf I've been constantly working on several areas of my game and have already seen improvement.

 

Product Set Up

 

Setting up the Shot Scope out of the box was very simple.  First I had to let the device charge for a few hours before I could set it up so I just plugged it in overnight.  When it's charged you use the provided USB cable, connect it to your PC and follow the instructions from there.  It only took a few minutes to get everything set up and honestly couldn't have been easier.

 

Part of the set up process includes screwing in the appropriate tags in the butt end of the grip on each respective club.  Righty-tighty, lefty-loosy…it's that easy folks.

 

SCORE: 10 out of 10

 

On-Course Performance

 

The GOOD:

+ While I'm not a fan of wearing things on my wrist while playing the Shot Scope is lightweight and was generally comfortable during play.  I honestly didn't notice it for the most part of my rounds.

 

+ You aren't required to “buzz” or “tag” a shot like you do with the Game Golf device.  Just select a club and swing away.

 

The BAD:

- GPS acquisition seemed to take considerably longer than my Game Golf device.  One round, for example, I turned on Shot Scope as I got out of my car, went to the pro shop to pay for my round, got my cart, loaded my bag, and drove to the first tee and it was still trying to acquire a signal…and it was a clear, sunny day to boot.

 

- In my last few rounds I noticed the device didn't pick up a couple of shots for some reason.  I had to catch this during the post-round edit but I had to rack my brain as to where the shot location was and what club I used.

 

- Pin Collect feature is pretty much useless if you cannot screw in the Putter tag.  In my case, I have a backweighted putter so I can't use the tag.  Shot Scope is aware of the issue but doesn't have a work-around so I don't get the advantage of putting stats that are accurate, in terms of distances on the green.

 

Additionally, the Pin Collect feature is still something I struggle to remember when on the green.  Oftentimes I found myself getting in my cart and remembering to mark my putt count and even a number of times had to do it on the next tee box.  Again, not a huge issue for me because it really doesn't mean anything other than capturing number of putts but for someone who could use the Putter tag that could be a misstep when it comes to accuracy in your stats.

 

A few examples from my last round where there were either random "ghost" shots or where the GPS tag placed me well off from where I actually made the shot...

 

My actual tee shot ended where the 2nd shot is marked.  However, my 2nd shot actually ended up where the 5th shot is marked (to the right of the greenside bunker).  Shots 3 and 4 were ghost shots that never happened.

 

Screen Shot 2017-04-29 at 11.14.40 AM.png

 

On this hole my tee shot was actually in the rough but just between the fairway and the cart path.  Shot Scope picked me up approx. 20 to 25 yards from where I actually made my 2nd shot.

 

Screen Shot 2017-04-29 at 10.46.53 AM.png

 

Same thing with this one.  I had to punch out with my 2nd shot and landed in the rough to the left of that large fairway bunker (where it bulges out a bit).

 

Screen Shot 2017-04-29 at 10.29.05 AM.png

 

On this particular hole I hit my tee shot to the right side of the cart path, which is a really steep bank.  I fatted the punch shot I was attempting and it only moved about 5 yards forward.  Shot Scope never picked up the following shot.

 

Screen Shot 2017-04-29 at 10.53.21 AM.png

 

PERFORMANCE SCORE: 30 out of 40

 

Post-Round Editing

 

Once you've synced the device to your PC after your round the editing process is pretty straightforward.  You can add/delete shots, change clubs, move shot locations, and add penalties with ease.  So, from a pure editing perspective I really like what Shot Scope has built into their web interface.

 

A couple sample screenshots from the editing interface...

 

Screen Shot 2017-04-29 at 9.33.14 PM.png

 

Screen Shot 2017-04-29 at 9.33.39 PM.png

 

Most of the time shots collected were pretty spot on but I did have a few shots that either 1) weren't recorded at all or 2) were WAY off from where the shot occurred.  For example, I hit a tee shot in my last round into the left rough.  However, Shot Scope picked up my shot about 20 or 30 yards into the woods left of that.  I'm not sure if this is possibly related to the fact I was somewhat close to the tree line and maybe something with GPS location was interfered with or not but I had a few of those issues pop up during post-round reviews.

 

When I first went out with the Shot Scope to begin testing it I tried to search and see if the course I was playing was available in their system.  This is a feature available in Game Golf and if a course isn't already pre-loaded a simple email to their customer service can get the course available in 24 to 48 hours typically.  Unfortunately, Shot Scope didn't offer a search feature so I had to assume my course was available.  When I plugged in after my round, though, I discovered it was not and I had to send their customer service team an email.  Now, they were great to work with so kudos to them on being so responsive.  That said, not having a search feature made the editing a challenge, as I had to think back on my round to try and recall shot locations, club selection, pin locations, etc.  It was very annoying and is something that I'd love to see Shot Scope make available on their website.

 

Once everything was edited I clicked into the Performance tab to start reviewing some of the data analysis features.  This is where I feel Shot Scope really fell flat, particularly compared to Game Golf and Arccos.

 

Both Arccos and Game Golf have built in very dynamic data analysis features into their mobile and PC-based interfaces.  As a Game Golf user and data-junky I love the visuals I can get post-round to really dig into my performance.

 

Some samples of the data visualization from Game Golf...

 

Screen Shot 2017-04-29 at 9.36.40 PM.png

 

Screen Shot 2017-04-29 at 9.36.22 PM.png

 

Screen Shot 2017-04-29 at 9.35.59 PM.png

 

Screen Shot 2017-04-29 at 9.37.53 PM.png

 

Screen Shot 2017-04-29 at 9.38.30 PM.png

 

As I got into Shot Scope to review the data it felt very lackluster and vanilla.  While some of the data is useful comparing the analytics and presentation in Shot Scope compared to Game Golf was, frankly, night and day with the clear advantage going to Game Golf.

 

Some samples from the Shot Scope web interface...

 

Screen Shot 2017-04-29 at 9.40.26 PM.png

 

Screen Shot 2017-04-29 at 9.41.49 PM.png

 

Screen Shot 2017-04-29 at 9.42.07 PM.png

 

Screen Shot 2017-04-29 at 9.42.24 PM.png

 

I wish I could give two separate scores here because I do like the editing feature.  On that front I'd say it's easily a 5 out of 5 stars.  Where Shot Scope really lost me was in the analytics side.  I was anxiously looking forward to their interface and once I got into it felt like it couldn't hold a candle to Game Golf or Arccos.  This, in my opinion, is a massive competitive disadvantage.

 

My recommendation to improve Shot Scope on the analysis side is to really look at changing the interface to be much more dynamic in use and presentation.  I'd be taking a hard look at what Game Golf and Arccos do well and try to implement some of those features because the fact that you only have to wear a wristband is already an advantage compared to them, in my opinion.

 

EDITING & ANALYTICS SCORE:  5 out of 15

 

Subjective

 

Frankly, I don't have any issues with the aesthetics of Shot Scope.  It's functional and simple.  Could they make the wristband more “Apple Watch” in it's appearance?  Sure, but it wouldn't be my first recommendation.

 

One feature I really like is the depth of the screw on the tags.  It's deeper than the Game Golf tags and when those puppies go in they are very snug.  Not that I had any issues with Game Golf tags coming loose but it's nice to know that the Shot Scope tags are really secure.

 

LOOKS SCORE:  15 out of 15

 

Likelihood of Purchase

 

When you look at the GPS Performance Tracking space there are really two major competitors that Shot Scope is going up against – Arccos and Game Golf.  Arccos requires you to have your cell phone in your pocket during the round, which is incredibly annoying.  Game Golf is much more subtle as it clips to your belt.  Although, it requires you to tag each shot.  Shot Scope is much simpler, as it's a legitimate option to simply turn on and go.  On that front, at least on paper, I'd say the advantage goes to Shot Scope.

 

While I don't personally love having something on my wrist during the round it wasn't that big of a deal at the end of the day and is much more convenient than having a massive iPhone 6+ in my pocket or remembering to tag every single shot.

 

Editing was a breeze with the Shot Scope and I felt like the interface was solid, so maybe a very marginal victory over Game Golf there.

 

Post-round analytics, though, really shot down my interest level.  If there was some serious improvement made to the analytics interface then I'd turn my proverbial frown upside down but I have to say that bogey was just too much for me to seriously consider purchasing the Shot Scope over Game Golf or Arccos.

 

LOP SCORE:  10 out of 20

 

TOTAL SCORE:  70 out of 100

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stage Three

 

1. Will this product go in your bag? Why or why not?
Likely not at this time.  Shot Scope is a great product but when it comes down to this versus Game Golf the latter wins out for two reasons.  One, I'm not a fan of wearing something on my wrist.  Two, the analytics side of the website isn't quite there yet.  If Shot Scope updates that side of the website then I'd be more inclined to re-consider it, but until then I'm going to stick with Game Golf.

 

2. To whom, if anyone, would you recommend this product? Why?
Anyone looking to dig into their game and develop a practice plan to lower their handicap will find value in this product.

 

3. How, if at all, did this product change your overall impression of Shot Scope?
I'd never heard of Shot Scope prior to this opportunity to test/review their product so I didn't have much in terms of expectation going into this test.  That said, Shot Scope's customer service was on point so kudos to them for doing a fantastic job on that front.  I do believe they have a great product that can be a valuable asset to golfers looking to improve their game.  A few tweaks and they will be right there with Arccos and Game Golf.

 

4. What feature would you change or eliminate from the next generation of this model?
Go read my Stage 2 to more detail.
 

5. What feature do you really like, and would most like to see continued or evolved in future models
Again, I'd refer folks to the Stage 2 review for this info.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First and foremost, sincere thanks to MyGolfSpy for the opportunity and also to Shot Scope for doing the right thing and stepping up to the DataCratic plate. I'm not entirely sure what I did to deserve inclusion but I'm genuinely looking forward to sharing my thoughts with the community. Please feel free to reach out with your questions throughout the review process.

 

I have (mostly) enjoyed competitive golf for the past 23 years. My Dad was a pretty slick player but before I started High School, baseball was my sole focus. What little magic surrounded the game at the 9-hole Hatch Bend Country Club (Cow Pasture) hooked me immediately. I was very fortunate to come out of the gate hitting the golf ball straight and solid but had absolutely no clue how to score. After witnessing me sink a 30 footer for 79 with a 7 club set of Tour Models roughly 6 months into playing, Pops decided a used set of Hogan Edges might not be totally wasted on me. To this day, he remains my favorite golfing buddy and inspiration.

 

The past 2 decades have been devoted to steadily improving with some lofty goals thrown in to keep me focused. I grew up in South Texas and took to heart Hogan's advice about digging a swing out of the dirt; in the form of 500+ range balls a day. My advice, do not hit 500 balls a day; because your hands will be a painful bloody mess and when you're my age they will reliably remind you of any impending meteorological developments. I am currently a scratch golfer of the ilk that still sometime scratch their head in confusion. At this point in my life, after numerous injury rehabs (currently shoulder), I don't see myself ever rejoining the truly prolific ball-striker club. But cognizant of my merely adequate long game, I have cultivated a short game system capable of respectably grinding me around a loop on even my worst days. Unless it's a putt 'em out tourney round, I am most likely cracking wise; enjoying myself and hopefully also creating some enjoyment for my playing partners. That said, I really really don't like shooting over par. I characterize my even par rounds (probably my most common tally) as follows "It's like I was never even here". I regularly shoot under par mostly in the frustrating -1 to -4 range and the odd round on the wrong side of par inhabits the same spectrum. Over the Summer I take my game seriously and play a schedule of USGA Championship qualifiers but the body just won't allow me to play hard all year round anymore.

 

I was barely 5 feet tall and under 100 lbs when I got my first real set and played a comical hook to keep up with the older guys. I can certainly work it both ways when necessary and I've experimented with a fade heavy game but these days my most comfortable stock shot is a lazy little draw. I am extra stoked to share WITB because my new set of wrenches is supposed to arrive tomorrow; but decided posting a before/after of my iron setup might help be informative to some of you. So without further delay...

 

witb1.jpg

 

Tmag M1 430 - 9.5* (std loft, front neutral, back neutral) on Adila Voodoo SVS6

King Cobra S9-1 Pro 15* on Matrix Ozik XCON 7 S

Nickent Genex 3DX Ironwood 17*on Matrix Ozik Altus Hybrid SG

Cleveland Ta3 gunmetal 3-PW (0.5" long; 1* up) on True Temper Tour Concept X1

Cleveland 588 RTX black 52.10 and 56.10 on Dynamic Gold S400

Macgregor Bobby Grace M5K-GT; 32.5" with Super Stroke Slim

 

witb2.jpg

 

I currently use a Bushnell Tour Z6, old fashioned geometry and a very busy scored card to track stats. Hopeful the Shot Scope system will help me dial in distances, more specifically the yardage range I can comfortably hit each club. It would also be nice to make scorecards that look like this a thing of the past.

 

stats.jpg

 

First impressions:

Apparently my Shot Scope's journey across the pond was an arduous one.

 

IMG_1556.JPG

IMG_1558.JPG

 

Sharp outer sleeve and overlapping magnetic closure with a nod to environmentally conscious sensibilities as there is little wasted space.

 

IMG_1563.JPG

IMG_1566.JPG

 

Third from the tightest wrist setting is comfortable (I have small wrists).

 

IMG_1567.JPG

 

Because I imagine it's the foremost thing on everyone's mind, standard sharpie for size comparison.

 

IMG_1572.JPG

 

Side view (covered charging port located between 2 buttons).

 

IMG_1575.JPG

 

Package includes Shot Scope wrist unit, 20 club tags, 20" (usb/mini hdmi) charging cord and small carrying case. The half dozen extra tags seem like a nice touch for folks that rotate gamer clubs in and out of the bag.

 

IMG_1582.JPG

 

Let's see if we can get a GPS lock...successful sitting in my kitchen at 3 min, 51 secs (literature warrants up to 10 min for initial GPS lock)

 

IMG_1590.JPG

 

Bluetooth pairing with my iPhone was also a snap.

 

IMG_1591.PNG

 

The Shot Scope and my iPhone seem to be talking like old friends

 

IMG_1592.PNG

 

The new wrenches came in yesterday so I decided to get all my ladies dressed up in their Shot Scope formal wear. Pretty maids all in a row. I'll take that one in the middle, she's perfect.

 

IMG_1623.JPG

 

The Beatles claimed "Love is all you need". Shot Scope claims the hardware in this pic is all you need...on the golf course anyway. Because of the aggressive thread pitch on the tag shafts, getting them seated flat on the butt of the grips takes patience. I backed several of them out and tried again before I was happy.

 

IMG_1625.JPG

 

First 9 hole test: Shot Scope scored my round correctly and the wrist band didn't bother me a bit.

 

IMG_1629.PNG

 

More details (i.e. Was I actually facing a 35 foot birdie putt here as Shot Scope suggested?) to come in Stage 2...

 

IMG_1627.JPG

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Shot Scope – Official MGS Forum Review by downlowkey

 

IMG_1612.jpg

 

I was initially hesitant about applying to review the Shot Scope. Mostly because the original MGS photo looked as though strapping something akin to a deck of cards to your wrist was required. But Shot Scope's claims of "Tour Level Statistics" in a passive stat collection package was ultimately irresistible. I'm sure we've all heard the phrase "There are no pictures on the scorecard". I agree with the sentiment but the scorecards I tend to keep over the Summer are stuffed full of stats and from this an undeniable picture of the state of my game begins to take shape.

 

The golf course is the only place on Earth that I actually turn off my phone and watching my pals constantly fidget with their Arccos systems has never jived with my inclination to truly cut the cord for a few blessed hours of peace. Enter Shot Scope, a GPS stat tracking system that requires a single procedure from the player; when you grab your ball out of the hole, simply press the button that corresponds with the number of putts you took. Sounds simple enough right? Thus far, based on researching comparable products, I would concur with Shot Scope's claim that it's currently the most passive GPS based stat collection system on the market.

 

Product setup

 

Shot Scope Setup.jpg

 

My initial impression; the procedures outlined in the user manual are so simple it's hard to believe the setup experience could possibly be as intuitive as they suggest. Well they certainly made a believer out of me on the software side of things but I have some reservations about the club tags that I will address separately. Shot Scope lists compatibility with both Apple OS and Android smartphone platforms, I paired the device with my iPhone and it was a snap. Step 1 - Download the Shot Scope app from the source of your choice, open on your phone and setup your account. Step 2 - Power on the Shot Scope wrist unit by holding the "0" button for 5 seconds. Step 3 - press button "1" for 5 seconds to activate pairing function. Step 4 - press the "Connect" button within the app. You're ready to play!

 

Now for the club tag design/installation. The supplied Shot Scope literature suggests the following "Rotate the tag clockwise. A slight downward force should be applied". I tried that and wasn't happy with the results. The thread pitch on the tag shaft is very aggressive. What does that mean? It doesn't take many rotations to seat the tag on the butt of the grip. However getting them flatly seated on the grip is tough because while the aggressive thread pitch goes in quickly, getting the tag in perfectly straight is all on you. Several times I thought the tag was lined up nicely only to have it go wonky the last rotation. Most of my clubs took multiple attempts before I was happy with the tag installation.

 

note: initial crooked tag install

Tags.jpg

 

I'm deducting points on both the software and hardware side of setup for the following reasons: Shot Scope's own instructions vary from the user manual to their support page (i.e. User Manual denotes pressing on/off/pairing buttons for 5 seconds but the support page on their full site lists it as both 3 seconds and 5 seconds. I know it seems trivial but consistency is the key to simplicity and they are sending mixed messages. I'm deducting another point on the tag installation side because it's not nearly as simple as Shot Scope suggests. A gentler thread pitch would require more rotations to seat but I'm certain they would go in straighter with less effort.

 

Setup: 8 out of 10

 

Performance on the Course

 

For my initial test of the Shot Scope wrist band I had planned on merely hitting a bucket of balls to assess the personal comfort. I've had some work done on my left wrist and playing occasionally requires a pretty tight tape wrap. In comparison, Shot Scope was virtually unnoticeable. Based on pictures posted by other testers, I am wearing the wrist unit higher up on my arm. This was a conscious choice because I thought the hardware chassis felt very uncomfortable when it covered the head of my ulna (that knobby bone emerging from the outside of your wrist). However with the unit positioned away from the ulna, it had no impact on my ability to make perfectly comfortable full swings.

 

In the interest of full disclosure, I was actually doing a dual test the first time I took the Shot Scope out to the course because my new set of irons had arrived the same day. Striping the new wrenches on the range with a potential tour level stat tracker on my wrist proved too enticing so I abandoned the last half of my range balls and headed out for a real test. I powered up the unit and had a GPS lock within about 90 seconds. Because I was playing with a brand new iron setup I was tickled at the prospect of immediately getting reliable distance feedback. But I was not content to take Shot Scope data at face value on the initial test so I used my laser for every target distance and then subsequently stepped off my actual shot yardages (+/- in relation to the hole). Thankfully I was flagging the irons and had to do very little pacing to verify my yardages.

 

After wrapping up 9 holes in a tidy 33 strokes I hurriedly paired the wrist unit to my phone to start assessing data. Shot Scope correctly scored my round and the accuracy seemed to be well within tolerances one can reasonably expect from the civilian GPS signal source. What does that really mean? Under ideal conditions, the best you can expect with an unencrypted c/a GPS signal is accuracy within 2-3 yards and single digit (less than 10 yard) accuracy the rest of the time. That bears repeating, no company that utilizes a legacy GPS signal source can honestly offer accuracy better than ~10 feet. I can live with that tolerance on the long game but in my opinion Shot Scope's claim of "tour level statistics" completely falls apart around the greens. Why is this a big deal? Over half of your shots occur in this area and Shot Scope's platform simply cannot offer the accuracy required to glean any nuanced data about your short game. I hate to sound harsh but it's reality. That said, I think just having the unit on my wrist positively affected my decision making process. It was obviously mental but I honestly think it added an intangible that for me belongs on the enviable side of the pro/con list. Overall accuracy: tee shots - perfectly adequate; approach shots - surprisingly accurate (all within 1 yard of actual on initial test); short game/putting - nothing to write home about. On the long game side of the spectrum Shot Scope is accurate and completely passive but on the short game side we should all come back to Earth because in this area you shouldn't expect the unit to do much more than reliably keep score and even that requires simple input from the player via "pin collect".

 

Shot Scope Screen Shots.jpg

 

On-course Performance: 32 out of 40

 

Performance Notes

 

Because I got some strange putting data on an incredibly clean 9 hole initial test round, I reached out to Shot Scope support to see if there was anything I could do differently to tighten up my data returns. In the process they were very open about how the system actually functions and because it's not really explained anywhere in their available information, I am going to share it with you. Within the wrist unit you have a GPS tracker that stores data (up to 100 rounds of data between syncs!!!). I've been syncing data one round at a time and it's a snappy upload. The unit also contains a proximity sensor that tags your GPS coordinates anytime a club tag is within ~10 cm of the wrist unit. Their system executes a probability compensation formula and suddenly the traditional scorecard is obsolete. Seems simple enough but this is not by any means a foolproof system. For example, I tend to read putts while gripping the putter in my left hand. I also tend to fix 5-10 pitch marks on every green in the same configuration. This combination results in very confusing data between your wrist unit and the eye in the sky. I have discovered these habits are deeply ingrained and to be honest, because the short game data is so loose anyway, I'm simply not willing to make the adjustment. I spent an entire round attempting to fix pitch marks with my left hand while switching the putter tap down finish to the right hand. It reminded me a lot of the first time I tried to wipe my posterior after shattering my right hand; surprisingly awkward and poorly executed. Furthermore, I didn't realize any improvement in my short game data.

 

Post Round

 

Editing

 

note: highlighted yellow for emphasis (actually red within Shot Scope platform); stats - (before) Shot Scope data, (after) actual

Shot Scope Edits2.jpg

 

The amount of post round editing required is going to be directly related to how well you played. My experience has been that clean rounds (no hazards/lost balls) requires virtually zero editing with the long game but no matter how careful I was about removing tagging variables, the short game data didn't really improve and required a great deal of editing via personal recollection of my performance. It's helpful to know how far I'm hitting my tee shots and approaches on average but beyond that I found the short game proximity data to be pretty worthless. I did all my editing on the laptop and the interface itself is very intuitive and quick (few min per round). Their support pages adequately address any questions you might have regarding adding penalties, addressing lost balls, tagging positional layups, etc. Currently Shot Scope only offers editing within their full site and while it is optimized for mobile devices, I wouldn't recommend trying to edit on anything smaller than a tablet screen. In the current interface configuration trying to edit rounds on your smartphone is a pain, meaning I can't (interface prohibitive) clean up my short game data over a beer in the clubhouse. I would really like to see user friendly editing functionality added to the Shot Scope app but it would probably end up bogging down what is currently a pretty snappy platform.

 

Editing: 13 out of 15

 

Looks

 

note: plastic buckle closure; wonky club tag, mini USB comparison (left - Shot Scope; right - typical)

Shot Scope Design.jpg

 

The first time my regular playing partner saw me wearing the GPS unit, he jokingly asked why I was wearing an ankle monitor on my wrist. Despite every photo of it looking like a brick, I would actually characterize the size as comparable to a box of matches. The strap buckle is a double tang-type closure (think typical belt buckle x2) but made of rigid plastic that in my opinion is the weakest point in the design. The chassis has clean lines overall and the designers wisely surrounded all the buttons with a shallow collar to prevent unintentional pin collects. But it lacks the fit and finish that implies "Buy me and I'll never let you down". My unit arrived with very thin but noticeable gaps in the seam between the body and the backing plate secured with four small screws. Maybe not a big deal but it makes me somewhat concerned about water resistance. Shot Scope says if the unit is "briefly" immersed in water to power off immediately, let dry for 24 hours and full functionality should return. Me thinks YMMV but based on my experience with their support, if it drowns within the first 12 months I'm betting Shot Scope will make it right. All that aside I still think it's well engineered. When the tags are properly installed they have nice thin profile (1/8") and I don't notice them at all. However, much like the wrist unit, under close inspection they lack fit and finish. On several of my tags the threaded shaft wasn't perfectly perpendicular to the end cap. This complicates getting the tag seated perfectly flat on the grip. The overwhelming majority of my tags also had bite marks from being clamped too tightly with a tool during the assembly process. Again, not a huge deal but I'm trying to be completely forthright about the things I noticed. Because I think they should do a better job on the finished product quality control on both pieces I'm deducting 2 points.

 

Looks: 13 out of 15

 

Likelihood of Purchase

It makes me sort of nauseous to have to do it but the likelihood of me purchasing this unit is very unlikely. That decision is based entirely on a combination of what I now know about the limitations of civilian GPS accuracy and my nuanced needs in the short game stat department. "Tour Level Data" this product is not; but it is well engineered, simple, intuitive, comfortable and a piece of cake to operate.

 

LOP: 5 out of 20

 

I believe Shot Scope does the job the designers intended and I fully intend to continue using it on the course, albeit with some adjusted expectations. In the right hands, this product could be very informative but beyond just how terribly I have been swinging my driver, the system doesn't offer any new insights about my particular game. I have decided the pie in the sky sort of passive "Shot Link style" stat system I envisage eventually being available would currently cost ~$50K USD. So for the purists desiring solid stat tracking without constantly reaching for their phone, at $220 USD ($187 w/ current discount code SHOT15) Shot Scope is a very nice system; it's just not for me.

 

Total Score: 71

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stage Three - The Five Questions

 

1. Will this product go in your bag? Why or why not?
Yes, this product will stay in the bag; or more accurately on my wrist. Mostly because it's completely painless stat collection and ShotScope's upcoming software updates (performance analytics) means the entire system is only going to get better. I used to keep a ridiculously busy scorecard and now I just let the system keep everything for me. The "pin collect" procedure is already so ingrained after a half a dozen rounds that Sunday I was playing a tournament round without it and still instinctively reached for my wrist every time I retrieved my golf ball from the hole. I also intend to use ShotScope extensively for additional real world comparison feedback on my upcoming Matrix Ozik MFS5 shaft review.

 

2. To whom, if anyone, would you recommend this product? Why?
I would recommend the product to anyone wanting to track stats in an almost entirely passive package. Is it perfect? No. Is anything out there perfect? Nope... Well... ShotLink is pretty infallible but that system requires millions U$D in equipment and an army of volunteers to operate.

 

3. How, if at all, did this product change your overall impression of Shot Scope?
This is tricky question to answer because I was entirely unfamiliar with the company prior to the MGS call for testers. Even then, I didn't initially apply because I couldn't really find out much about the company or the product. So I suppose my initial impression was skepticism due to lack of information. The subsequent product support I have experienced makes me think both the product and the company are going places. And as you Arccos legacy early adopters recently realized from the Caddie beta release; there are sometimes benefits to being to being counted amongst the first to pull the trigger.

 

4. What feature would you change or eliminate from the next generation of this model?
There are a number of areas in which improvements are possible, so if it's alright with you I'd like to break this one into sections.

 

Physical product: I still don't trust the rigid plastic double-tang type buckle. My suggestion would be to get rid of the current rubber wrist strap entirely in favor of a fabric strap with Velcro closure. I think it would make the unit more universally comfortable and Velcro is fairly indestructible in this sort of application.

 

Capabilities: It's nice that the unit will function for 8 hours without a charge but no round of golf takes that long. I would redirect battery potential toward processing power. Your cell phone for example computes all sorts of compensation algorithms to improve location accuracy. I feel like with a stronger processor and shorter viable battery life ShotScope could drastically improve accuracy. As it stands, I have to really think my way through a round in the editing process; but I've decided that's not really a bad thing for my golf game.

 

Performance Analytics: As I have stated elsewhere in this thread, I think ShotScope totally "phoned it in" in this area. The current interface is abysmal; borderline depressing. But I also think their leadership team is completely cognizant how far behind the curve they are in the analytics game and it is my understanding that imminent software updates will show a marked improvement. So they rushed the bare bones system to market and intend to fill in the interface gaps via feedback; a lot of companies introduce tech under this formula. Hopefully we will see some updates soon.
 

5. What feature do you really like, and would most like to see continued or evolved in future models
I think this product is pretty unobtrusive but that probably would not be the opinion of everyone strapping on the current wrist unit. I hope they will put some more thought into construction with comfort and universal fit being the paramount goal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice start on the review Kanoito

I'm somewhat surprised the apparent size (as in large) of this thing didn't warrant a comment by you. I'd also like to see a photo of it on your wrist and next to an object we can all identify with for size reference.

 

I actually have some interest in a band type device for GPS - distance measuring  purposes. But everything I've seen to date are too large for my tastes. Even the ones that are actually somewhat smallish by todays standards. I'm waiting for a true Band type of device. Almost lays flat around the wrist. Certainly not any type of bulky device. It's coming eventually.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice start on the review Kanoito

I'm somewhat surprised the apparent size (as in large) of this thing didn't warrant a comment by you. I'd also like to see a photo of it on your wrist and next to an object we can all identify with for size reference.

 

I actually have some interest in a band type device for GPS - distance measuring  purposes. But everything I've seen to date are too large for my tastes. Even the ones that are actually somewhat smallish by todays standards. I'm waiting for a true Band type of device. Almost lays flat around the wrist. Certainly not any type of bulky device. It's coming eventually.

 

Hey Plaid, thanks!

Hmmm, the size didn't bother me... it's rather similar to the watch I wear on a daily basis to work.

Will shoot a comparison photo tomorrow for you :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@PlaidJacket

I updated the original post with a few comparison photos, hope that gives you a better idea!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First and foremost, sincere thanks to MyGolfSpy for the opportunity and also to Shot Scope for doing the right thing and stepping up to the DataCratic plate. I'm not entirely sure what I did to deserve inclusion but I'm genuinely looking forward to sharing my thoughts with the community.  Please feel free to reach out with your questions throughout the review process.

 

I have (mostly) enjoyed competitive golf for the past 23 years.  My Dad was a pretty slick player but before I started High School, baseball was my sole focus.  What little magic surrounded the game at the 9-hole Hatch Bend Country Club (Cow Pasture) hooked me immediately.  I was very fortunate to come out of the gate hitting the golf ball straight and solid but had absolutely no clue how to score.  After witnessing me sink a 30 footer for 79 with a 7 club set of Tour Models roughly 6 months into playing, Pops decided a used set of Hogan Edges might not be totally wasted on me.  To this day, he remains my favorite golfing buddy and inspiration.

 

The past 2 decades have been devoted to steadily improving with some lofty goals thrown in to keep me focused.  I grew up in South Texas and took to heart Hogan's advice about digging a swing out of the dirt; in the form of 500+ range balls a day.  My advice, do not hit 500 balls a day; because your hands will be a painful bloody mess and when you're my age they will reliably remind you of any impending meteorological developments.  I am currently a scratch golfer of the ilk that still sometime scratch their head in confusion.  At this point in my life, after numerous injury rehabs (currently shoulder), I don't see myself ever rejoining the truly prolific ball-striker club. But cognizant of my merely adequate long game, I have cultivated a short game system capable of respectably grinding me around a loop on even my worst days. Unless it's a putt 'em out tourney round, I am most likely cracking wise; enjoying myself and hopefully also creating some enjoyment for my playing partners. That said, I really really don't like shooting over par. I characterize my even par rounds (probably my most common tally) as follows "It's like I was never even here".  I regularly shoot under par mostly in the frustrating -1 to -4 range and the odd round on the wrong side of par inhabits the same spectrum.  Over the Summer I take my game seriously and play a schedule of USGA Championship qualifiers but the body just won't allow me to play hard all year round anymore.

 

I was barely 5 feet tall and under 100 lbs when I got my first real set and played a comical hook to keep up with the older guys.  I can certainly work it both ways when necessary and I've experimented with a fade heavy game but these days my most comfortable stock shot is a lazy little draw. I am extra stoked to share WITB because my new set of wrenches is supposed to arrive tomorrow; but decided posting a before/after of my iron setup might help be informative to some of you. So without further delay...

 

attachicon.gifwitb1.jpg

 

:taylormade-small: __M1 430 - 9.5* (std loft, front neutral, back neutral) on Adila Voodoo SVS6

:cobra-small:__S9-1 Pro 15* on Matrix Ozik XCON 7 S

:nickent-small:___Genex 3DX Ironwood 17*on Matrix Ozik Altus Hybrid SG

:cleveland-small:____Ta3 gunmetal 3-PW (0.5" long; 1* up) on True Temper Tour Concept X1

:cleveland-small:____588 RTX black 52.10 and 56.10 on Dynamic Gold S400

:macgregor-small: _____Bobby Grace M5K-GT; 32.5" with Super Stroke Slim

 

attachicon.gifwitb2.jpg

 

I currently use a Bushnell Tour Z6, old fashioned geometry and a very busy scored card to track stats. Hopeful the Shot Scope system will help me dial in distances, more specifically the yardage range I can comfortably hit each club.  It would also be nice to make scorecards that look like this a thing of the past.

 

attachicon.gifstats.jpg

 

First impressions:

Apparently my Shot Scope's journey across the pond was an arduous one.

 

attachicon.gifIMG_1556.JPG

attachicon.gifIMG_1558.JPG

 

Sharp outer sleeve and overlapping magnetic closure with a nod to environmentally conscious sensibilities as there is little wasted space.

 

attachicon.gifIMG_1563.JPG

attachicon.gifIMG_1566.JPG

 

Third from the tightest wrist setting is comfortable (I have small wrists).

 

attachicon.gifIMG_1567.JPG

 

Because I imagine it's the foremost thing on everyone's mind, standard sharpie for size comparison.

 

attachicon.gifIMG_1572.JPG

 

Side view (covered charging port located between 2 buttons).

 

attachicon.gifIMG_1575.JPG

 

Package includes Shot Scope wrist unit, 20 club tags, 20" (usb/mini hdmi) charging cord and small carrying case. The half dozen extra tags seem like a nice touch for folks that rotate gamer clubs in and out of the bag.

 

attachicon.gifIMG_1582.JPG

 

Let's see if we can get a GPS lock...successful sitting in my kitchen at 3 min, 51 secs (literature warrants up to 10 min for initial GPS lock)

 

attachicon.gifIMG_1590.JPG

 

Bluetooth pairing with my iPhone was also a snap.

 

attachicon.gifIMG_1591.PNG

 

The Shot Scope and my iPhone seem to be talking like old friends

 

attachicon.gifIMG_1592.PNG

 

Meat and potatoes to come in Stage 2...

 

That's one impressive scorecard !!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've enjoyed both intros so far.

As I stated in my initial impression back when this review/product was first announced.. this device is bulky. Not sure why it has to be so large. Also, thanks for the updated photos Kanoito. Yours were good to downlow.

 

I'll be most interested in your thoughts and impressions of the size one you're had some time with it on the course.

 

Thanks guys. Good work.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's one impressive scorecard !!

Thanks pards. It was the familiar tale of missed putts. The ball behaves nicely up here at 5500 feet and would credit the thin atmosphere with the tidy fwy/GIR stat line.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Daily Deals

  • Sponsors

  • Our Sponsors

     
     
     

  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      80,389
    • Most Online
      2,247

    Newest Member
    jaysat
    Joined
  • Similar Content

    • By cynogriffin
      This is a thread for those who are interested in reading or sharing golf ball comparisons! 
      Personally, I am in the stage of personal ball testing to try to find my next gamer for the next season or two. As such, I have been and am in the process of testing a variety of premium golf balls to see which fits my game and personal preferences. My posts in this site will be coming from off my new website (linked here for those who might want to check it out: https://griffinc6.wixsite.com/golfreviews) and will be in the form of a head to head matchup between two of the balls I am considering. During my tests, I will be taking two different models to the course and playing 9 holes with each in the same round, same day, and same conditions. In my posts, there won't be much in the way of technical data other than distance (measured via Shot Scope) but will rather be how I experienced the balls in terms of distance, spin, flight characteristics, performance and fell around the green, putting, quality, durability, and consistency. Once again, for my posts here, these are by no means a scientific test, but rather what I prefer, what I see, and how the balls perform for me. Therefore whatever performs for me might not translate to your game or your experiences with these products. I also invite everyone to post your own comparisons, head-to-heads, and reviews here as well!
      Now that that is out of the way, let the discussion begin!
    • By ChasingScratch
      Ping Sigma 2 Tyne 4 – Review
      A little background
      Let’s just start with this:  I am not a stellar putter.  I’m not even an average putter.  I’ve been known to be the ‘take a 6 footer for birdie and turn it into a 7 footer for par’ kind of putter.  I’d like to think part of it is due to the wide variation in greens I get to play on (anything from Plinko on the Price is Right to lightning fast U.S. Open greens), but the reality is I just haven’t been that good.  I’m a dad with limited income to spend on golf and little practice time.
      I started this journey to become a Scratch golfer about two years ago.  Since then, I won a free full bag fitting through Club Champion and had a blast doing it.  My favorite part of the whole experience was the SAM PuttLab fitting.  According to the PuttLab, I’m a consistent slight puller of the putter.  My wonderful human of a fitter recommended mallet style with some toe hang.  He laid out a bunch of putters that fit this mold and I immediately started arching the putter rather than pulling it.  I had never really seen that arch path before and I thought I was going to push every putt 3 feet right of the hole.  Needless to say, I made 25 straight 8 foot putts before we re-tested with my favorite putter of the bunch (the Ping Sigma 2 Tyne 4, which also happened to be the cheapest, go figure).
      The thing that was instantly attractive about this putter was the fact that it could be adjusted for length.  I’m 5’8”, take an athletic posture with my putter, and have long arms.  Long story short, I need a short putter, but everything you can buy off the rack comes between 33-35” (or so it seems).  We cranked it down to 32.5” and bent the loft to 1 degree.  Oh……….my…………GAWD!!!  I’m in love, I’m in love, and I don’t care who knows it!!!
      Eye Candy (aka Looks)
      First off the looks.  This think is a beauty! 

      I love the tynes off the back, makes me think of a fighter jet’s wings.  Who doesn’t love fighter jets?!?  As an added bonus, they are very useful when picking the ball up after you just lagged that 40 footer to inside of 1 foot! 

      Grip
      The stock pistol grip is phenomenal as well.  It really helps me to get my thumbs on top of the grip and parallel to each other. 

      Insert:
      People seem to either love or hate insert putters.  I get it, there is soft and then there is too soft.  Not many people want to feel like they are hitting the golf ball with a marshmallow attached to a shaft.  The dual insert on the Ping Sigma 2 putter line is perfect for me.  Soft enough to feel good at impact, but not soft enough to make you question if you hit it hard enough.

       
      Overall:
      I absolutely enjoy putting practice now!  Get this, you ready for it?  I’ve taken nothing but my putter to the golf course and spent over 1hr putting with my kids!?!  Crazy right? Who does that???  Not a single driver, iron, or wedge hit.  Pure putting. That’s how much I love this putter and how much confidence it gives me.
      I’ve only had two rounds with it, but I’ve had 30 and 31 putts with it so far.  Both of those rounds had at least 3 putts that either lipped out or stopped within 1” of the hole.  Only one 3-putt (and that was on a 60 foot putt, all of my playing partners 3-putted that horrible green lol).  From 5-8 feet, I feel like it is going in all the time.
      Had I the foresight to know that I would be joining MGS, I would have taken stats with my previous putters (yeah, I’m the guy who had like 7 putters all on the bench ready to get in the game whenever the starter started 3-putting) and run an ANOVA on putting metrics to see if this new putter is significantly better or if it is all in my head.  I have since sold those putters and am on the road to a single putter relationship.  You have to give this putter a try if you like the looks of a mallet style fang putter.  It also scored well this year and the previous model as well last year in the MSG putter tests.
      Give this thing a look!!!!  I think I’m going to go roll some putts on my carpet!!!
    • By Green Sheep Productions
      Hey all, 
      Anyone bought one of Vice's stand bags? The barrel of my bag is about to die, have been eyeing these off... But I hate buying something I haven't seen in the flesh (?) before. My favourite bag was from a gone bust company called Lind Golf, but can't find a bag with as many features. 
      Unfortunately not heaps of pictures of the Vice bag that aren't dolled up and taken from a romantic angle. 
    • By GolfSpy Dave
      Dave's Take: Cigar Product Review Compendium
      Follow the links below to the various cigar accessories that I have reviewed. Feel free to ask any questions about the products in this thread, or in the original product threads.
      Xikar VX-2 V-Cut Cutter

      Xikar Tactical Triple Torch Lighter

       
      Xikar XFlame Electronic Cigar Lighter
       
      Palio Triple Torch Lighter and Cutter

       
      Xikar HP4 Quad Jet Lighter

       
      Xikar Turrin Single Torch Lighter

       
      Xikar XO Double Guillotine Cutter

       
      Xikar Travel Humidor

       
      Xikar 19th Hole Gift Set

       
      The Cigar Minder Clip

       
      Bettinardi Milled Cigar Tray

       
      Mantello Catador Torch Lighter

       
      Alaska Bear Antique Copper Cigar Cutter

       
      Stay tuned for more great cigar products, and if you find something worthy of taking a look at, shoot me a PM. -Dave
       
       

    • By GolfSpy Dave
      Dave's Take: Jaybird Tarah Bluetooth Headphones
       
      The Jaybird Tarah headphones may have entry-level pricing, but they deliver great sound, especially when paired with the Jaybird app.
      Jaybird is the Word
      The Jaybird Tarah is the third pair of Jaybird Bluetooth headphones that I have taken through the review process, having previously reviewed the Jaybird X3 and Jaybird Run models. In both of the previous reviews, I was definitely impressed with the Jaybird products, especially since I had never even heard of the brand prior to the first review.
      Well it’s been about a year since I published the Jaybird RUN review, and I am happy to say that those headphones, and the X3 headphones, continue to perform flawlessly. The Run headphones are a staple of my golf bag, and my son uses the X3s at the gym on a daily basis. Nothing better than your kid pilfering your cool stuff, huh?

      Unfortunately for the Tarah headphones that I am writing about today, the previous experiences have elevated my expectations for this new model. It’s sort of like being the third kid to go to a high school when both of your elder siblings were valedictorians. 
      Although I understand that the Tarah's role is as Jaybird’s entry-level model, it still has some big shoes to fill.
      Jaybird Tarah: IN THE BOX
      TARAH Wireless Buds Silicone Ear Gels: S/M/L Cord Management Clips Cord Shirt Clip USB 2.0 Charging Cable + Charge Clip Color: Nimbus-Gray/Jade Price: $99.99 Comfort and Fit

      Since they are of similar construction, most of my comparisons ended up being between the Tarah and the X3 headphones. The Run headphones are kind of their own thing, and not really an appropriate direct comparison.
      Anyway, like the X3 model, the Tarah headphones fit into your ears using a combination of silicone fins and ear inserts. The difference here is that while the X3s had separate fins and ear buds, the Tarah headphones come with the buds and fins fused into single units.
      Obviously this is going to cut into the versatility of fitting a bit. No longer can you pair small buds with large fins, or something like that. You really now only have three fit options. Hopefully one will work. For me, medium ear gels worked just fine.
      One thing that I really like about the new single-piece system is that the buds and fins are always in proper alignment with each other. Occasionally, the fins can twist out of place on the X3, and the Run, headphones. On the Tarah, this can’t happen since they are single piece units.

      Like the other Jaybird headphones, the Tarah headphones had no trouble staying in place through practice sessions on the range, or during workouts at the gym. Once I had the proper ear sock size, I just adjusted the cord a bit to secure them. After that, it was all about the music.
      Ease of Use

      Pairing is immediate. Not only for the first time that I paired them with my phone, but also when I paired them to my iPad later for movie watching. Just press and hold the power button and they are discoverable. So easy.
      The controls are very intuitive. Press +/- for volume control; hold them to skip songs. Nothing crazy here, which I like. They work like they should.
      Like the other Jaybird headphones, the Tarah headphones have a microphone and can be used to make calls. That’s not really a primary use for me, but they did perform just fine during some test calls.
      Sound Quality

      One of the things that I like about the Tarah and other in-ear headphones is that they block out a great deal of ambient noise when you insert them in your ear. They are not noise canceling, but they definitely block the noise.
      The nice thing about this is that when outside noise is reduced, you can now hear your music at lower volume, saving your battery and maybe your ears as well. The Tarah headphones can still get plenty loud, but it’s not necessary.

      The sound out of the box was good, but had a bit of that small speaker feeling. Bass was pretty absent, and overall I was not that impressed. However, after pairing the headphones with the free MySound app, and tweaking the EQ sound profile to add more bass, my mind changed completely.
      Once you adjust the setting on the app, the sound from the Tarah really blossoms. It was a huge difference. If you buy a pair of these, or any Jaybird headphones, the MySound app is a must use. You’ll be very pleased with the sound changing option and likely find an EQ mix that suits your style.
      Battery

      The Jaybird Tarah only features a six-hour battery as opposed to the eight-hour battery found in the X3. This is likely going to cover any single-setting headphone need that I have, though it will probably require more frequent recharging than other models.
      The cool thing is that the battery charges quickly. You can get an hour of play with only 10 minutes of charge.

      Like the Jaybird X3, charging the Tarah requires a special USB cord. If you are not prone to losing stuff, this is not likely a big deal. If you are one that spends hours searching for missing cables, then maybe you should order an extra cable.
      Jaybird Tarah Headphones Review: Summary

      The Jaybird Tarah headphones are solid entry-level Bluetooth headphones. For $99, you get a lightweight, easy to use, and great sounding headphones. If you need more fit versatility, then you can go to the X4 model. If you want a longer battery life, you can go to the newly released Tarah Pro with a 14 hour battery!
      I think that the Jaybird Run headphones will still be my go to headphones for the driving range, because of the charging case, but for most other applications, I’m going Tarah.
      Find out more at the Jaybird website, and at Amazon.
       
      Detailed Specifications: Jaybird Tarah
      AUDIO
      Type: In-ear style Noise-isolation: Passive Impedance: 16 Ohm Speaker sensitivity: 99 +/- 3dB at 1KHz Output max. 10mW RMS (with level limit) Total harmonic distortion <5% (1KHz, 1mW) Audio format: 16-bit stereo Codec: Bluetooth SBC implementation Response bandwidth: 20Hz - 20kHz Driver size: 6 mm BLUETOOTH
      Bluetooth version: 5.0 Frequency band: 2.4 GHz Profiles: Handsfree , Headset , A2DP , AVCRP , SPP Wireless range: Class 2 standard range 10m/33ft INTEGRATED MICROPHONE
      Type: MEMS, omni directional Sensitivity: -38dB +/- 1dB (Test conditions: 1KHz, 0db = 1V/Pa) COMPATIBLE PRODUCTS Any Bluetooth device with HFP, HSP and A2DP WEIGHT & DIMENSIONS
      Headset: 528mm x 13.25mm x 23.6mm Controller: 45.7mm x 11.7mm x 5.6mm Charger: 112mm x 33.6mm x 7.2mm Weight of headphones (without ear gel): 13.85g Weight of charger: 6.5g BATTERY
      Play time: 6 Hrs* Charging time: 2+ Hrs Quick charge: 10 min = 1+ hour playtime Charging: Via USB charging cable with Pogo pin connector Input power: DC 5V 1A Type: Lithium Ion Battery voltage: 3.8V Energy voltage in watt hrs per battery: 0.2wh *May vary dependent on usage, device & aging  



  • Recent Topics

  • Latest from the Blog

  • Happy Birthday Today!

×
×
  • Create New...