Jump to content
dang3rtown

2017 "Most Wanted Golf Ball"

Recommended Posts

MGS, the driver test was fantastic but, I think there are one or two OEMs that still aren't sufficiently enraged by your unbiased data. So, when do we get to see a, "Most Wanted Golf Ball" study?

 

I saw that back in December the subject was unofficially broached. Is this in the works?

 

I would love to see this in a similar format as you do for drivers. Get a bunch of testers, have them use their own clubs and a control set of clubs. Data collected using the testers' own clubs could be compared ball to ball relative each tester's average performance, with control clubs you could just put the raw data out there. Perhaps use a driver and a 7i.

 

For short game, you could use a combination of launch monitor data and player questionnaires.

 

For putts, you could use a similar format as was used in the "Most Wanted Putter" test, looking at strokes gained per round.

 

I realize, a proper ball test is a huge endeavor but I think it's what MGS was made for!

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the trouble with a ball test is do you compare a 4 piece ball to a 2 piece ball or a 3 to a 4... ect

There are so many different types and manufactures out there it become a very difficult task to do a proper test.

 

I think the only fair way to do a proper test is you have to do a 2 piece ball test and then a 3 piece test and a 4 piece test and have them all separate. 

 

I would love to see MGS do this as I believe that the golf ball is the most untruly marketed piece of golf equipment out there. everyone clams to be long and soft and straight. Which ones provide what they are actually claiming? 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Time to invest in a swing robot and put every ball to the test. Those would be some interesting numbers.

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Time to invest in a swing robot and put every ball to the test. Those would be some interesting numbers.

Hmm.

 

 

- Alan

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the trouble with a ball test is do you compare a 4 piece ball to a 2 piece ball or a 3 to a 4... ect

There are so many different types and manufactures out there it become a very difficult task to do a proper test.

 

I think the only fair way to do a proper test is you have to do a 2 piece ball test and then a 3 piece test and a 4 piece test and have them all separate. 

 

I would love to see MGS do this as I believe that the golf ball is the most untruly marketed piece of golf equipment out there. everyone clams to be long and soft and straight. Which ones provide what they are actually claiming? 

 

Honestly, I don't care how the ball is built, I care how it performs. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How the ball is built is directly related to how the ball performs. Different golfers with different swing types (slow or fast swing speed, hooks/slices tendencies ect..)  have different needs from the balls they use.

 

The correct ball type selection for your swing will help you be more consistent in your shots.

 

example - if your swing speed is say 70 or 80mph and you slice the ball why would you use a ProV1? Just because it's a "performance ball"? in most cases a ball like that will actually make your problems worse not better as you're getting a lot more spin which will increase your slice.

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Time to invest in a swing robot and put every ball to the test. Those would be some interesting numbers.

 

Would it? Personally, I think any results would be pretty boring reading. Unless we can allow robots to hit balls for us during a round, then any data collated from those machines would be useless.

I care how a ball feels first and foremost. Next is how receptive it is to spin. The trajectory part can be controlled by myself. The distance part is down to the rules of golf and what makes the ball conforming.

In just about any test I've ever seen the results were inconclusive, or not worth caring about. Interesting? Er....no.

If anyone can find a ball that they're happy with and at a price point that they like, I would say that the robots can go and jump in lake and rust.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How the ball is built is directly related to how the ball performs. Different golfers with different swing types (slow or fast swing speed, hooks/slices tendencies ect..)  have different needs from the balls they use.

 

The correct ball type selection for your swing will help you be more consistent in your shots.

 

example - if your swing speed is say 70 or 80mph and you slice the ball why would you use a ProV1? Just because it's a "performance ball"? in most cases a ball like that will actually make your problems worse not better as you're getting a lot more spin which will increase your slice.

 

Yes, I still don't see that as an argument for separate tests. Let everyone test everything. See how the data plays out. You can group people and balls by any sub set you want later. Don't limit the test to what you think "should" be right, just let the data speak for itself!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ain't gonna lie, I doubt I could tell the difference between many golf balls in similar class. ie: v1 vs tp vs zstar etc.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I might be in the minority here, but I'm not interested in this at all. Because golf balls are so plentiful, and the results would have to be so detailed, the time this would take to do (to the MGS standard of course) would make it ridiculous. Testing every golf ball out there from every situation, with launch monitors, and multiple testers, is just too massive an undertaking. I would hate to lose things like glove tests, shoe tests, etc. just for balls.

 

Guys on youtube are reviewing balls all the time. In general, when you group balls by what type they are, they perform basically the same. Dean Snell has been saying for years that testing for distance is useless because almost all balls go about the same distance. 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know if they need to do a full blown golf ball test, but I would be interested to see an update of the smaller market balls compared to one another. I know MGS blew the golf world away with the Costco Kirkland ball review, but I would be interested in seeing a report of Kirkland vs Snell vs Vice etc to see what the best value of those are. For example, the Kirkland may perform well, but if the cover is going to wear twice as quickly as the Vice counterpart, how does that factor in to the value you are getting. I think a story was done similar to this a couple of years ago before other boutique golf ball companies all went out of business because of lawsuits for patent infringement, but it would be interesting to see an update of how the players still left in that "tour caliber but affordable" sweet spot stack up. 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd love a test of all the urethane balls out there.  I play the Taylormade Project (a) a lot, and love it because it is affordable, has great feel, but doesn't spin like crazy off the tee or for long iron shots.  That said, there are lots of urethane's out there, and I'd like to see MGS see what I'm missing. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@jhellrung, I too use the Taylormade project A and love it. I've tried other balls in similar construction,  Callaway, Snell, Titlelist and found with the A's to be more consistently straighter off the tee and more green control with my wedges.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm actually pretty curious to see an honest and comprehensive test of the main golf balls out there (e.g. Pro V1, ChromeSoft, etc.), and see how they compare to the new kids on the block (Snell, Forte, Kirkland, etc.). Realistically, the biggest differences between them all (if any) would become apparent on the full wedge shot (~120-150yd) and pitching into greens (~50yd), as well as any "feel" comments made from simply putting the balls across a green (that's how I know if a ball is worth keeping in my bag or not).

 

Potentially, you could use the winning entry as your control ball in any future "Most Wanted" club tests.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just don't see how's it going would be possible to get statistically relevant data to do a test worthy of the MGS seal. Just way too many variables

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The thing I'd most like to learn about choosing golf balls is how different balls actually affect your game, based on specific knowledge of your game.

 

For example, if I know I swing my driver 104mph on average, how does a ball that is claimed to be for under 105mph swings affect my game Vs. a ball that is claimed to be for over 105mph.

 

Is swing speed actually the best measurement for choosing a ball, or is there too many variables and that's simply the best constant?

 

I think I'd actually rather see a test of how balls react to miss hits. Which ones are able to minimize swing errors (if that's at all possible)

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How about refurbished v straight from the box. Lost golf ball and websites similar offer the best economics of premiums however a head to head would really make a statement

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using MyGolfSpy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How about refurbished v straight from the box. Lost golf ball and websites similar offer the best economics of premiums however a head to head would really make a statement

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using MyGolfSpy

+1 would love to see this type of study. Most of my balls are refurbished for cost and I have always felt there's no difference whatsoever.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using MyGolfSpy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am a self professed ball snob! I wont play refurbished or second hand balls and my bag will always be full of one model which currently is the Chrome Soft Truvis. I would be interested in seeing the balls tested and ranked according to their type and price point.

 

I think this may be a tremendous undertaking but since I'm not doing the work lets see what MGS can come up with!.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...