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ChappyEight

Businessman's Lunch Practice?

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Sorry if this thread already exists somewhere, but I couldn't find anything in the search.

 

I get ±60 minutes for lunch at work each day.  There is a golf academy ~10 min from my office that includes a full driving range, both indoor and outdoor, putting/chipping greens, bunkers, and a par 3 exec course.  So, I could practice any aspect of my game that I wish.

 

I figure I could probably get to this academy 2-3 days per week during my lunch hour and so I would love some suggestions on how best to practice during this time.  I'm a decent ball striker but my handicap sucks because I'm terrible around and on the greens.  So, that would obviously be where my time would be best spent.  

 

So, with that in mind, what would you suggest?  What would be some good drills to do and the amount of time for each drill to fill the 45 minutes of practice time?  Also, should I consider taking a long lunch onto the par 3 a couple times a month?I

 

I've never actually practiced regularly before but I badly want to start.  Your input is much appreciated.

 

- Chappy

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Two options here that I see.  Practice on your own, or try and get in for a 30 minute lesson build a game plan with an instructor.  There are pro's and con's to each route.

 

Going with an instructor would be my first choice, even if it's just for a couple lessons to help build a game plan and a solid practice schedule and routine.  It's usually not a bad decision to seek the help of a professional.  The down side is going to be instructor availability within your lunch hour time frame and then the cost of lessons.

 

Going solo isn't a bad choice, it's just not always the easiest way to see if you're doing it right.  I'd recommend picking up Dave Pelz Short Game Bible as some reading material.  It has a ton of great strategies and different things to work on within the short game.

 

Think of it this way, if you are ill or injured would you rather diagnose yourself on WebMD and hope it gets better or would you go see a doctor?  In the long run you might be OK doing either route, but DR is usually the better option.

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Agreed with everything Meyer said. Absolutely get an instructor if you want to get better. Here's what I can add in case that's not an option:

 

I'm in the same exact situation as you except my "facility" is just the local golf course. They've got a little green with 75y to approach. Like you, my wedge/short game was the worst part of my game. I got myself a shag bag and I like to follow this routine during a couple lunch breaks a week:

 

- 10 standard shots at 50y

- 10 bump and run at 50y

- 10 at 60 yards

- 10 standard at 75y

- 10 various flights (high/low/mid) at 75y

- 10 open faced flops to the 25y

- Chip the flops and everything else that missed onto the green and try to make them in the hole

- Pick 'em up and go back to work

 

I generally do the whole thing with one or two clubs trying to travel as light as I can. At this point, my wedge game has become a strength and I'm shooting lower scores because of it. You just have to be careful not to groove bad swings. If you're having a bad day or the swing feels funky, pack it up and go work on those TPS reports.

 

 

 

 

 

Sent by carrier pigeon using MyGolfSpy

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Another agreement with Meyer!!

 

And also while you're at it, you could ask the pro to help you develop a practice plan for those 2 to 3 days a week you're there but not working with him.   I think if you are able to find a good short game practice routine that addresses your weakness and focus on that at least once or twice a week, you'll see drastic improvement.

 

And I was in a similar work situation as you before, and i did opt about once a month or so to stretch that lunch hour into a quick nine holes.  If you're able to do that without it creating any problem at work. 

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If you need to improve your around the green game then you need to start seeing the balls drop. I'd start with 2 foot putts. Make 10 then move on to 3 foot or skip a foot to 4' make 10 then go to 6'. For lagging putt don't putt to the hole, just pick one edge of the fringe and putt to another try to get as close to the edge without going over.

 

That's really all you need for putting. Most golfer miss the greens by about 15 yard+/- a few so practice your pitch and chip from that distance.

 

Stick with the basic fundamentals then in a months or 2 you'll start seeing big improvement.

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I agree with everything suggested in the previous replies.   If I have any additional suggestion, it may be to dedicate each practice session to a specific part of your game.   As I understand, you have a 60 minute window with a total commute of 20 minutes, leaving 40 minutes for practice and that you will be able to practice 2 to 3 times weekly.   Accordingly, for example, you may dedicate your first session to your driver and fairway metals, the next session your irons and the third to your short game.   In this way, you will not be pressed to get though your entire bag and will have more time to concentrate on each swing for the proper technique for you.  In other words, you will be able to concentrate on the quality of your practice as opposed to quantity.

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I think a lesson from a professional teacher would be really useful. Shorter more frequent lessons are probably ideal. Alternatively, since you mentioned how you suck around the greens, I would highly recommend James Sieckmann's "Your Short Game Solution" and "Your Putting Solution". His books are short and loaded with training regime tips and methods to construct a 30 minute practice session. Sieckmann is a lot more simplified than Pelz, but you should still check out Pelz because he also has some good tips and his "Short game handicap" assessment is a really good indicator of how you are improving. 

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I would agree with Meyer, there is no substitute for a set of educated eyes looking at your swing.

 

Someone told me one time, "you can practice every day for the rest of your life, but if your practicing bad habits and a bad swing then you'll never get any better."

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I like the pro/game plan route but failing that I would work on random short game shots and play them out. That way you get simulated pitching, chipping and putting of all lengths from a variety of lies. Make yourself a deal that if you can make ten in a row you will have an ice cream or get to play the par three course the next day. Random short game practice can be fun and rewarding in regards to strokes saved on the course.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using MyGolfSpy

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Most efficient use of your time would be to spend most time on putting / chipping

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using MyGolfSpy

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I'll agree with the others, the FASTEST way to gain a few strokes is with practice on your chipping and putting.  But its important to realize that there's only so much you can improve those phases of the game.  You might gain 3 or 4 strokes, and you can probably do it pretty quickly, but eventually you'll need to improve your full-swing game to go any further.  Seeing a competent instructor early in the process is, in my opinion, the best way to get started.  I'd suggest spending a half-hour or so, maybe twice a week, on full swing work.  That would leave you a few minutes to practice putting on those days (you can hit lots of short putts in 10 minutes), and one complete session to work on chipping, pitching, and putting.

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