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Sluggo42

Stupid pin placements

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There are a few young guys that are new at my course and you can always tell when they are the ones moving the pins because they end up on crazy slopes....they also tend to create "volcano cups" by not getting the area level when they cut the new hole...so you end up having putts get right to hole and then roll backwards or to either side. It can be very infuriating.

 

 

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There are a few young guys that are new at my course and you can always tell when they are the ones moving the pins because they end up on crazy slopes....they also tend to create "volcano cups" by not getting the area level when they cut the new hole...so you end up having putts get right to hole and then roll backwards or to either side. It can be very infuriating.

 

 

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Oh man the dreaded "Volcano cup". One of my worst pet peeves. No reason for that.

We r usually the first group out in the morning so we deal with it 1st.

 

 

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Another issue our Super has to deal with. We have extremely small greens. Money was running out during construction so one of the areas they decided to save was the size of the greens to cut down on maintenance cost.

 

So combine that with all the unrepaired ball marks, sometimes he pulls his hair out trying to find suitable locations for pins

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Working at a golf course the thing I despise most about really dumb or tough pin placements is how it affect pace of play. Especially at a busy course where there are a lot of weekend warriors have the course set up really tough only slows things down and upsets ppl more.

It's far nicer when it's set up on the easier side so players enjoy themselves more and the pace keeps up. Even if you can fix bad golf, you can still try to make it easier.

From a playing perspective I don't mind tough pins, but agree with a lot of you where there are some pins that truly aren't fair...however that's golf! And in the end if it helps me become a better golfer I'll take the pain of them in the short term and hopefully get better in the long run.

 

 

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What's all this pin talk; are you guys bowling? The word "pin" appears nowhere in the USGA Rule Book. The object you fellas are ranting about is referred to as a flagstick.

 

 

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What's all this pin talk; are you guys bowling? The word "pin" appears nowhere in the USGA Rule Book. The object you fellas are ranting about is referred to as a flagstick.

 

 

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Pin is easier to type on my phone than flagstick or hole location. Ha

 

I think I read a story about this once and where the tne term pin came from. But I can't recall where it was.

 

 

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I've had a few conversations with my pro about this. The most common reason for this is that the guy cutting the pins is not a golfer and isn't paying attention and/or doesn't care. Pins on knobs, pins 4 feet off a green those are the things that indicate it.

 

Though every once in awhile the pro knows a group outing or tourney is coming ans he decides to torture them for a day.

 

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I've had a few conversations with my pro about this. The most common reason for this is that the guy cutting the pins is not a golfer and isn't paying attention and/or doesn't care. Pins on knobs, pins 4 feet off a green those are the things that indicate it.

 

Though every once in awhile the pro knows a group outing or tourney is coming ans he decides to torture them for a day.

 

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Yes that's called the Superintendent's Revenge.  I used to set up a few of those during my days working on the grounds crew at ANCC.

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Whenever going to the course, I always hope that whom ever is setting the pins had a real good night with their spouse or significant other.

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I've had a few conversations with my pro about this. The most common reason for this is that the guy cutting the pins is not a golfer and isn't paying attention and/or doesn't care. Pins on knobs, pins 4 feet off a green those are the things that indicate it.

 

Though every once in awhile the pro knows a group outing or tourney is coming ans he decides to torture them for a day.

 

I ve heard the "Super's Revenge" term B4 and it's true.

 

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Another issue our Super has to deal with. We have extremely small greens. Money was running out during construction so one of the areas they decided to save was the size of the greens to cut down on maintenance cost.

 

So combine that with all the unrepaired ball marks, sometimes he pulls his hair out trying to find suitable locations for pins

What course is this at?

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I have set pins for several tours including Majors. Every tour will issue guidelines for pin placements and for many events, will supervise the placement of dots at the beginning of the week. While there are no specific rules, they would never allow a position where the ball rolls up to the hole and then rolls back. It happened once in modern history (US Open at Shinnecock) because the greens became incredibly dry and the governing bodies have never forgotten it.

A good rule of thumb for your club should be; 6 easy, 6 medium, 6 hard - 6 front, 6 middle, 6 back - 9 right, 9 left. Easy is considered, away from hazards and 15-20 of relatively flat ground around the pin. Medium is usually flat, the length of the flagstick around the hole. Hard is near a hazard, edge of the green or only 3 feet of flat surface around the hole (about the length of the cup cutter).

It is almost impossible to do this as you change the cups, it takes planning. If your superintendent doesn't have preplanned pin placements, I suggest that you and your buddies create one for him/her using the guidelines above. If they don't use it, then you have good reason to ****** and I would loudly.

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What course is this at?

Compass PoInte in Maryland.

 

 

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Call me crazy but... I like tough flag placements! Putting is usually boring, if I have to aim 45* in the wrong direction, that's fun!

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Call me crazy but... I like tough flag placements! Putting is usually boring, if I have to aim 45* in the wrong direction, that's fun!

Yes it is ....sometimes.

 

 

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I have set pins for several tours including Majors. Every tour will issue guidelines for pin placements and for many events, will supervise the placement of dots at the beginning of the week. While there are no specific rules, they would never allow a position where the ball rolls up to the hole and then rolls back. It happened once in modern history (US Open at Shinnecock) because the greens became incredibly dry and the governing bodies have never forgotten it.

A good rule of thumb for your club should be; 6 easy, 6 medium, 6 hard - 6 front, 6 middle, 6 back - 9 right, 9 left. Easy is considered, away from hazards and 15-20 of relatively flat ground around the pin. Medium is usually flat, the length of the flagstick around the hole. Hard is near a hazard, edge of the green or only 3 feet of flat surface around the hole (about the length of the cup cutter).

It is almost impossible to do this as you change the cups, it takes planning. If your superintendent doesn't have preplanned pin placements, I suggest that you and your buddies create one for him/her using the guidelines above. If they don't use it, then you have good reason to ****** and I would loudly.

I've heard that B4 about the 6,6,6 from a course Super years ago.

Yes we were at Shinnecock that US Open weekend, WOW that was terrible.

There was also a US Open at Wing Foot that came close to to dry/fast.

You must have some good stories from setting pin placement at major venues.

 

 

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I've heard that B4 about the 6,6,6 from a course Super years ago.

Yes we were at Shinnecock that US Open weekend, WOW that was terrible.

There was also a US Open at Wing Foot that came close to to dry/fast.

You must have some good stories from setting pin placement at major venues.

 

 

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Not Really. Usually a bunch of stuffy, boring men, rolling balls all over the place for 30 minutes a green while you stand there staring into space. Only to put the pins within inches of the same place they used the last time. I decided to document the process at one particular Major, only to have my disposable camera smashed in front of me (yes this was before smart phones).

 

One side note, I got very good at manipulating the Stimp Meter to give them whatever reading they were looking for. Dave Pelz actually invented a system to prevent that and get accurate readings and demonstrated it for use. Unfortunately, hardly anyone used it. I think he stopped making them but not sure.

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Last Summer I had a tee time at a Denver Metro course that is typically tough but fun. When I walked into the Pro Shop the sweater folder working the register warned me about the special setup that day. Once a year, they put on a tournament for the members called "War of Attrition". The superintendent pulls up everything but the tip tee markers, double cuts/rolls all the greens and sets the holes in what he believes to be the most ridiculous locations. It was absolutely nuts. Just one of many sadistic examples; on the 9th hole I had a 9 footer for birdie and walked off with double after sinking a really tough 15 footer. At the time I was playing around +2 index; my 52 putts on the day added up to a total score of 89.

 

 

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One good thing of tough/tricky/unfair pin placements is that while teaching a younger kid to play it makes them think about the putt, even if it's only 2' or so.  I've on-course mentored many kids who take the tricky "short ones" for granted.  It provides an excellent learning experience.

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