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This is probably the 3rd thread I have started about putting.

I don't feel like I putt poorly considering I don't 3 putt very often, but I really don't make many putts either.

Lately I have been really struggling with coming up short, on everything. Yesterday I had 7 birdie putts, and 4 par putts that came up short. All of them were tracking on the correct line, but every one camenup short, some were 3 feet short, and some were 2 rolls short, this has been a problem for the last 6 weeks or so, and no matter what I tell myself, or whatever drill I try I cannot seem to roll the ball all the way to the hole. It hasn't mattered whether the greens are slow, medium, or fast speed I am short on all of them.

Am I alone with this issue, has anyone else or does anyone else have this problem. How do I go about correcting the problem. I feel like I am stroking the ball at the correct speed, but nope it's short again.

Please don't say go get fitted, it's not the putter, I believe it to be a mental issue. Does anyone have experience with this issue and can you help.

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Just my opinion as I've suffered from the same issue.  It's being scared of the comebacker.  Sorry I don't have an easy fix for you either.  But I agree it's a mental thing and it stems from not wanting a knee knocker for a 2nd putt.  

 

You have to keep reminding yourself not to be scared of hitting it by.  After all, if you watch the putt roll past you already know exactly how it will break.  

 

One drill you can do to help with speed control is not putt to a hole.  Lay down a piece of string on the putting green and try to hit it as close to the string as possible without being short.  

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Another speed drill is a ladder drill.  Hit your first put to a target, any target.  Then each succeeding putt must go past the previous one.  See how many you can hit before you get to a specific landmark, maybe the edge of the putting green.  If you leave one short of the preceding putt, start over. 

 

Its important to remember that even the best players make very few from outside 10 or 12 feet.  From 20 feet, the pros average about about 14%, or about 1 make for 7 attempts.  Your goal is to 2-putt, and it sounds like you do that pretty well.  Leaving a putt just a little  short from this range isn't really all that bad.  

 

Just my opinion as I've suffered from the same issue.  It's being scared of the comebacker.  Sorry I don't have an easy fix for you either.  But I agree it's a mental thing and it stems from not wanting a knee knocker for a 2nd putt.  

I agree with this.  So another thing to do is to practice the short ones, to decrease the "fear", or to increase your confidence.  If you know you'll make the next one from 4 feet, its easier to plan to hit the first one 2 feet past.

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I never thought about a ladder drill. That makes sense for helping to make sure you get the ball past the hole. 2 putting is what my goal is, and I succeed 99% of the time. So I have very few 3 putts. It's just really disappointing when I make a really good shot only to miss the putt.

 

I don't consider myself a bad putter, I just can't get anything to fall. It's a proven fact that putts that are left short don't go in 70% of the time.

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Make a bigger swing with the putter?  There really isn't a secret to hitting a putt farther;  just have to make the right length stroke for the distance.    

 

Does this happen at a particular distance or do you leave all putts short?

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I don't consider myself a bad putter, I just can't get anything to fall. It's a proven fact that putts that are left short don't go in 70% of the time.

But even for the average on the PGA tour, when you hit a putt 5 feet past, you miss the next one 1 out of 4 times.  2 feet short is a whole lot better.

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Make a bigger swing with the putter? There really isn't a secret to hitting a putt farther; just have to make the right length stroke for the distance.

 

Does this happen at a particular distance or do you leave all putts short?

Lately it's been pretty much everything. I dont expect to make eveything, I would like to make a few of them, most of the ones I missed on Saturday we're from the 10-15 foot range. Either for par or for birdie. I think I'm going to have to start knocking them 3-4 feet past in order to get through the mental block. It seems no matter how often I tell myself, hit it harder and get it past the hole, for what ever reason I just don't. It really is frustrating.

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Lately it's been pretty much everything. I dont expect to make eveything, I would like to make a few of them, most of the ones I missed on Saturday we're from the 10-15 foot range. Either for par or for birdie. I think I'm going to have to start knocking them 3-4 feet past in order to get through the mental block. It seems no matter how often I tell myself, hit it harder and get it past the hole, for what ever reason I just don't. It really is frustrating.

 

Shouldn't be missing short from that distance.  Try to make sure you are finishing your stroke and make the putt with some authority and not dying the ball in the hole.

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I tried the pendulum motion; rocking the shoulders, longer backswing and followthrough for longer putts.  It wasn't for me.  The longer my backswing, the more offline I get.  I don't hit the ball square in the center.  I just can't control the stroke.  I also had moments of indecision which led to deceleration, especially after I just blew one by the hole on my last putt.  Like I have said; I was a lousy putter.

 

Three years ago I changed my putting stroke.  My backswing is much shorter which allows me to keep the putter head inline with my intended path better.  I gauge the speed of the putt and then impart the correct amount of acceleration, trying to keep the putter head inline with the path as long as possible.  It took a lot of practice, but I have better control of both speed and line.  I found this to be critical for me since I look at the hole, not the ball when I putt.  A long backswing, not looking at the ball, is a disaster for me.

 

I have one issue that I have to continually practice in order for me to make a good accelerating stroke.  I use the normal trail hand low grip, and I must maintain hands ahead of the ball and a cupped trail wrist.  If I lose the cupped trail wrist, I lose speed control.

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I tried the pendulum motion; rocking the shoulders, longer backswing and followthrough for longer putts. It wasn't for me. The longer my backswing, the more offline I get. I don't hit the ball square in the center. I just can't control the stroke. I also had moments of indecision which led to deceleration, especially after I just blew one by the hole on my last putt. Like I have said; I was a lousy putter.

 

Three years ago I changed my putting stroke. My backswing is much shorter which allows me to keep the putter head inline with my intended path better. I gauge the speed of the putt and then impart the correct amount of acceleration, trying to keep the putter head inline with the path as long as possible. It took a lot of practice, but I have better control of both speed and line. I found this to be critical for me since I look at the hole, not the ball when I putt. A long backswing, not looking at the ball, is a disaster for me.

 

I have one issue that I have to continually practice in order for me to make a good accelerating stroke. I use the normal trail hand low grip, and I must maintain hands ahead of the ball and a cupped trail wrist. If I lose the cupped trail wrist, I lose speed control.

Just to clarify I didn't say that you needed to use the rock the shoulders approach. I am left side dominant in my stroke.

 

You sound like you are better at controlling face angle and use different speed/tempo with a single stroke length for different length putts. The cupped wrist and always having the same stroke length is how you get the face angle correct at impact.

 

But your point about acceleration is still important. You need to make sure you complete the stoke to get the ball to roll the right distance consistently.

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One of the things that I have been working on is hitting my puts solid.  It might sound easy but this last year my percentage of puts hit solid was around 50%.  Pathetic right??? Haha

 

If the strike is not consistent then getting a feel for distance is almost impossible. On a day were things are coming up short your putter head speed might be perfect but a miss hit takes a couple feet off every put.  Another benefit that I have noticed on a solid strike is the ball just rolls better.  It looks like the ball is stuck to the ground rolling end over end instead of bouncing half way to the hole.  

 

This is the one thing that I am focused on over the winter.  Hopefully it will pay off int he spring.  

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Just to clarify I didn't say that you needed to use the rock the shoulders approach. I am left side dominant in my stroke.

 

You sound like you are better at controlling face angle and use different speed/tempo with a single stroke length for different length putts. The cupped wrist and always having the same stroke length is how you get the face angle correct at impact.

 

But your point about acceleration is still important. You need to make sure you complete the stoke to get the ball to roll the right distance consistently.

You are right.  I need to ensure that the face angle is correct and repeatable, since not looking at the ball, I have to trust it.  It's also why I need to continually practice putting drills to keep it that way.  It works for me.

 

Yes, I always complete the stroke, and I have also found that the putts roll better when I keep the putter head low on the followthrough.

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A “quick” fix for me when I get in a funk of leaving putts short is to lean the shaft forward delofting the putter. Most of the time it works until I start running them by 5-6 foot. Then I go back to my regular stroke.

 

 

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Deceleration is big issue for me I think. I want to say there are a lot of things I do correctly, but there are some small details that I struggle with. Deceleration, continuing the stroke through the ball, sometime I find myself having a sort of pop stroke,(Snedeker),but I am not intending to do that so there is no acceleration to the ball with it. Very simple small things thoughout the putting stroke, but very necessary in being able to get the ball all the way to the cup

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With a 'strong arc' putter swing I found my most accurate putts are with a short backswing. Now that winter is here my putting green is set up in the basement. The Ping putting app has been very helpful in understanding my putting stroke - but as they say the best teacher is the golf ball

 

 

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If I started a thread every time my putting starts to deteriorate again, I'd be well past the 5,000 mark by now. Try keeping the clubhead low to the ground on your follow through. Also, make sure your not decelerating. That one can sneak into your stroke sometimes!

 

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Practice putting at various length putts on the putting green but put 3 tees in the ground behind the hole .... about 12" from the hole.  Try to putt to the tees instead of the hole.  Just imagine the hole isn't there & the hole just gets in the way.  That way you are putting to the tees, a specific target which are behind the hole .... if you miss, fine ... you are still within tap in range.  But you got it to the hole.  Then imagine those tees are there during your play on the course.

 

The key is to get the correct pace.  If you are getting the line right, then it's not your green reading ability.  Putting is all about confidence.

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I've found it best works for me to practice dominant handed only (lefty playing righty). To practice, I setup on a straight putt and place 4 balls in increments (2ft, 4ft, 8ft, 10ft) using left hand only. Usually stop when I get a good streak. Then I putt from distances I expect to be from on the course, but if I miss, I use Harvey pennick method moving ball 1 club length further.

 

I've tried numerous putters (B60, 2-ball tank, anser 2, pal) and different grip sizes (all SS versions, pingman, tour traditional). Even tried claw and pencil grip.

 

Finally, found what works; ping craz-e( g2i/sigma)pp62 grip, utilizing double overlap.

Also keep head down, on the spot where ball was and only turn head, resist moving head vertical; started making putts. If I miss 1st putt, I have a high percentage 2 putt from short distance.

 

Best of luck, hope this helps

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using MyGolfSpy

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I've found it best works for me to practice dominant handed only (lefty playing righty). To practice, I setup on a straight putt and place 4 balls in increments (2ft, 4ft, 8ft, 10ft) using left hand only. Usually stop when I get a good streak. Then I putt from distances I expect to be from on the course, but if I miss, I use Harvey pennick method moving ball 1 club length further.

 

I've tried numerous putters (B60, 2-ball tank, anser 2, pal) and different grip sizes (all SS versions, pingman, tour traditional). Even tried claw and pencil grip.

 

Finally, found what works; ping craz-e( g2i/sigma)pp62 grip, utilizing double overlap.

Also keep head down, on the spot where ball was and only turn head, resist moving head vertical; started making putts. If I miss 1st putt, I have a high percentage 2 putt from short distance.

 

Best of luck, hope this helps

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using MyGolfSpy

I'm using a similar approach on my indoor putting practice. I'm a lefty (and playing lefty). and using my right hand as the dominant. Left hand is on the club but very light touch - so right hand is doing all the work. Pretty successful so far but wish I had a longer putting mat as mine is only 9' long.

 

 

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I'm using a similar approach on my indoor putting practice. I'm a lefty (and playing lefty). and using my right hand as the dominant. Left hand is on the club but very light touch - so right hand is doing all the work. Pretty successful so far but wish I had a longer putting mat as mine is only 9' long.

 

 

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Good to hear. My mat is only 12ft, but stuck using it until weather clears and fertilizer dissipates.

 

Excellent vibes for season though.

 

 

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