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2011 Callaway RAZR Hawk Driver


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What does it offer that is new and better? This is a serious question, not rhetorical.

 

I'm guessing nothing. Unless they've been holding out on face springy-ness (COR) or MOI... there isn't a whole bunch this club will do differently than what's already out there. It will have that snazzy new "it" shaft (whatever that might be), ensuring that it'll be worth every cent of the $500 it'll likely retail for.

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The head is "forged composite" material. It is an eighth lighter than titanium and ten times as durable. I talked to the rep today and he said Callaway wont be making titanium head drivers ever again. It also comes with a stock Aldila R.I.P shaft. Aadvertisers for the club say you will get 8 extra yards than your old driver. Its 46 inches but the extra inch only attributes to 3 or 4 yards of those extra yards.

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The head is "forged composite" material. It is an eighth lighter than titanium and ten times as durable. I talked to the rep today and he said Callaway wont be making titanium head drivers ever again. It also comes with a stock Aldila R.I.P shaft. Aadvertisers for the club say you will get 8 extra yards than your old driver. Its 46 inches but the extra inch only attributes to 3 or 4 yards of those extra yards.

They won't make titanium head drivers ever again.. till that becomes the "IN" thing. If it does they'll jump on the bandwagon like everyone else will do. LOL!

An extra inch is gonna equal 20 extra yards of dispersion too. People have a lot of trouble handling 45" shaft lengths.

Sorry, I'll pass.

•Never argue with an idiot. First, he will drag you down to his level. Then he will beat you with experience!•

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They won't make titanium head drivers ever again.. till that becomes the "IN" thing. If it does they'll jump on the bandwagon like everyone else will do. LOL!

An extra inch is gonna equal 20 extra yards of dispersion too. People have a lot of trouble handling 45" shaft lengths.

Sorry, I'll pass.

 

 

So once I cut this down to 44.5", I will be lucky to hit this as far as my current driver, right? Pass.

 

Callaway's getting just as bad with hype as Taylormade! I wonder what they're going to do when drivers get to the 48" maximum... They probably also failed to mention the "extra yards" were gained by a robot swinging 100mph... or ~10mph faster than the average male.

 

They're just recycling old crap lines. When drivers were persimmon, the cast steel heads were more superior because they were metal. As the manufacturing process got better, they could make bigger heads- they were better. Then, titanium entered the fray, allowing clubheads to be bigger while maintaining the same ~200g weight... so that meant they were better. Now, it's "fusion technology". There's three things I see wrong with that:

 

1. no metal (or wood) is better than the other. A steel driver at 10* isn't "better" than a Ti or persimmon 10* driver. The catch: if you hit it "on the screws", there is NO DIFFERENCE between materials/head sizes. Where Ti has the advantage is on off-center strikes; the MOI factor. That's it.

 

2. while lowering the center of gravity is good, if can be overdone. Too much weight low and in the backend can raise the effective loft of the driver at impact- turning your 10* driver into an 11-11.5 at impact. This isn't as important as:

 

3. the USGA/R&A's STRICT rules on head size. Lowering the CG throughout (not localized in the back) the head will help with feel; it has NOTHING to do with performance. If you lower the CG but maintain a ~200g head, you've gained nothing. As long as the driver is conforming within the Rules, there isn't much game-improvement you're going to see... unless someone is one of the "lucky" few who can handle a 45+ inch driver.

 

 

Chey and Saturn, I'm going to join you in the "pass" line.

 

 

 

Yeah, I edited this... sad it took me a few days to realize my error... It's what I mean, not what I say! LOL

Edited by Justin66
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Just to add a little to this. A guy I have a LOT of respect for, Tom Wishon, says:

"... the average driver length on the PGA Tour these days is 44.5 inches. If these guys could keep a 45-45.5-inch driver in play, believe me, they would be using that length because those pros who have a "paltry" 115-mph swing speed hate having to hit three clubs more into a green than the 125-plus-mph guys they compete against. So tip No. 1 for more distance is unless you are smooth as silk, neutral-to-flat on your swing plane and athletically gifted, get that driver length down to no more than 44 inches. The quicker your swing tempo and the more often you miss that sweet spot on your driver, the more reason to be at 43 inches or 43.5 inches with your big stick.

 

Caution: don't just head to the garage and pull out the hacksaw to shorten your existing driver. Shorter length drivers must be headweight balanced to that shorter length. So if you are contemplating better accuracy with your driver, head to your local clubmaker's shop to get it done right."

 

Regarding swing speed and loft...

"If your swing speed is under 100 mph and your driver loft angle is less than 11 degrees, 90 percent of you have more distance that you're leaving in the bag every time you play. If your swing speed is 80-85 mph, which is the average driver swing speed of a male golfer today, (That article is from 2005. I think today's stats might be higher, but I think that is because people are measuring their HEAD speed with a longer driver) you're giving up real distance increases of at least 10 yards or more if you are not using a driver with a loft angle of at least 12-13 degrees. And if you have a swing speed under 80 mph and you're not using a driver with at least 14-15 degrees of loft, well, you've got a lot more distance sitting in your bag too."

 

I know not everyone agrees with Wishon, but he's been right more often than not!

 

My swing speed is ~~96-97 mph. Just for my own satisfaction, since the Dymo is currently banished from my bag anyway, over this winter I'm going to get it cut down to 44 inches and see what happens to my dispersion pattern and distance when I use it. That will be 1.75 inches shorter than it currently is.

•Never argue with an idiot. First, he will drag you down to his level. Then he will beat you with experience!•

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Good to see that, Mike. There are so many people that get wrapped up in what name is on the soleplate, what brand shaft/grip is attached to it (when it really is as simple as proper length, shaft flex, loft and grip size) that they're missing the fact the OEMs are HURTING their games with stuff like that sold off the rack.

 

It's a fact that retailers can't feasibly stock every single option that a company provides... it would bankrupt them unless everything was flying off the shelves! That's why the OEMs went with the one "standard"... but they're abusing it. When a club is 46.25" (like most non-TP TMAG drivers sold today) and people are being advised to use 44-45" shafts... that's a problem; not for the OEMs, but for the average golfer.

 

Think about it: Tiger Woods was the last guy to give up steel shafts for the driver... he gamed a 43" (standard)model. When he switched to graphite, he went to 44.5"- and STILL hits it 300+ when he wants to. But notice? 44.5"... not 45.75" like the retail version sells at. If we want to be cynics, yes, he does have trouble with accuracy; but if he was gaming a 45.75" "stock" driver, imagine how much worse it'd be, since he'd have even more trouble squaring the face at impact...

 

The average golfer needs to realize that these are the BEST golfers in the world, and they have their stuff properly fit to their swings. If it's that important to the best players, it's just common sense that says we mortals should be doing the same thing.

 

I've said it before and I'll say it again: if anyone hasn't read "The Right Sticks: Equipment Myths That Could Wreck Your Game" by Wishon- read it. It opened my eyes and I'm sure it will others.

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And if you have a swing speed under 80 mph and you're not using a driver with at least 14-15 degrees of loft, well, you've got a lot more distance sitting in your bag too."

 

Interesting...

I wonder if that's why I can smoke a ball farther with my fairway wood (15 degrees) then my driver (10.5 degrees). I also choke way up on both as the shaft length is crazy long on them.

I laught at your claims to fight a zombie apocalypse when most of you can't stand up to a Spider

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Could very well be. :D I know I can hit my 3 wood as far as i can hit my 10.5* driver. And yet... I pull the driver on nearly every tee box... now is that dumb or what?? LOL!

•Never argue with an idiot. First, he will drag you down to his level. Then he will beat you with experience!•

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Heh, the only place I bring the driver these days is to the lessons when we work on the woods. Otherwise, that thing stays in my bag and I tee all driver shots with the #3. I'm thinking of nabbing a #5 as well since I've got 2 open club spaces in the bag.

 

Oh silly shiny drivers and how you try to seduce me everytime I walk into a golf store...

I laught at your claims to fight a zombie apocalypse when most of you can't stand up to a Spider

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Callaway's getting just as bad with hype as Taylormade! I wonder what they're going to do when drivers get to the 48" maximum... They probably also failed to mention the "extra yards" were gained by a robot swinging 100mph... or ~10mph slower than the average male.

 

They're just recycling old crap lines. When drivers were persimmon, the cast steel heads were more superior because they were metal. As the manufacturing process got better, they could make bigger heads- they were better. Then, titanium entered the fray, allowing clubheads to be bigger while maintaining the same ~200g weight... so that meant they were better. Now, it's "fusion technology". There's three things I see wrong with that:

 

1. no metal (or wood) is better than the other. A steel driver at 10* isn't "better" than a Ti or persimmon 10* driver. The catch: if you hit it "on the screws", there is NO DIFFERENCE between materials/head sizes. Where Ti has the advantage is on off-center strikes; the MOI factor. That's it.

 

2. while lowering the center of gravity is good, if can be overdone. Too much weight low and in the backend can raise the effective loft of the driver at impact- turning your 10* driver into an 11-11.5 at impact. This isn't as important as:

 

3. the USGA/R&A's STRICT rules on head size. Lowering the CG throughout (not localized in the back) the head will help with feel; it has NOTHING to do with performance. If you lower the CG but maintain a ~200g head, you've gained nothing. As long as the driver is conforming within the Rules, there isn't much game-improvement you're going to see... unless someone is one of the "lucky" few who can handle a 45+ inch driver.

 

 

Chey and Saturn, I'm going to join you in the "pass" line.

 

 

Amen to that. And who the crap doesn't agree with Wishon? Man is a equimpent genius.

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