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1 hour ago, pulledabill said:

Congrats..do you IF every day? Im laying here in bed with black coffee thinking to not IF today as its my day off, but Im feeling okay if I decide to IF. I tried to find  info on when to stop an IF for a day or two time wise. Im eating10a-6p.

IF has no set rules other than the types of IF. 16:8, 20:4 or a 24 hour fast 1-2x/week. 

IF is nothing more than one way to control caloric intake and usually used to make eating in a deficit easier, but it’s possible to over eat in using IF.

 

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20 hours ago, txgolfjunkie said:

Chisag, I think you post some fantastic reviews for golf equipment, courses, etc. However, I had to cringe a few times reading your post on healthy eating. This is not a social media attack, just a difference of opinions...a good old fashioned disagreement...

Fear mongering is rampant in the weight loss industry. Don't eat this, don't eat that, demonize carbs, demonize sugar, etc. While a very small percentage of folks thrive on fear mongering, mentally, it's an unhealthy approach to your relationship with food. Fear mongering tells people that certain foods are evil, deadly, etc so they stay away as best they can, then when they give into temptation, they binge and bust their 'healthy' habits. How do you know if the person prescribing a diet may not have a full grasp on nutrition? They eliminate large food groups/ingredients/macros in order to achieve the same goal: caloric deficiency. You can be healthy eating the occasional pizza, just eat a salad beforehand. You can be healthy eating oreos, just stick to two, not a dozen. You can be healthy eating Arby's but limit it to once every other week, not every three days. 

Sugar, salt, fat, gluten, dairy, red meat, GMOs, and non-organic produce/food are all healthy...in the right dose.

Let's start with sugar. Sugar is not addictive like cocaine. The study performed with rats back a few years ago was flawed and many have spoken out about it. The rodents were only fed sugar every 2 hours. What human only eats sugar throughout the day? I would be hungry too if I was only given a dose of sugar every two hours instead of something satiating like a turkey sandwich or a hamburger. Sugar, in the right dose, is not harmful. Should you eat sugary foods/drinks every meal? No. Should you shun sugar? No, because your body NEEDS sugar. That's right. Your body NEEDS sugar, whether its glucose, fructose or sucrose. Does it need a lot? Well of course not. Cutting out sugar from your diet means cutting out fruits, vegetables, bread, dairy, every condiment, as well as every alcoholic beverage. A true sugar free diet is certain animal proteins, some vegetables and some nuts. Your body will not like that diet. 

Salt. There are studies that show salt are not as detrimental to those with good blood pressure. Basic overview is that if you have high blood pressure, watch your salt. If you have good blood pressure, it's not nearly as severe. The mineral content in fancy salt is so minimal, you would need to eat a crazy amount of salt for your body to benefit. Iodized/table salt is not unhealthy. However if you consume 1/4C of salt a day, then you should be more concerned with your intake than if you use Himalaya, pink sea salt, iodized salt, etc. 

Let's talk food advertising. Did you know there are only 10 GMO crops approved by the USDA? Those 10 are corn, potatoes, soybeans, canola, sugarbeets, apples, papayas, cotton, squash and alfalfa. You know what's not listed? Wheat. If you're buying Non-GMO pasta because of fear, guess what, you've been fooled. And the USDA has funded 82 studies concerning GMOs found in various ingredients/produce and 6 studies showed the GMO were healthier/safer than conventional foods, 62 showed no difference, 7 were inconclusive and 6 were shown to be less healthy/safe than conventional foods.

Organic foods might be the biggest sham by the food industry. Let's take the 'dirty dozen' produce list. Oh man, according to fear mongers, if you eat a regular strawberry, then you'll get cancer from all the pesticides. Guess how many regular strawberries one would need to eat in order to consume an unhealthy amount of pesticides? 186.

Did you know that when you spend the extra $2/lb for organic/antibiotic free chicken, you're buying the exact same chicken as the regular, less fancy chicken? USDA hasn't given a true definition of antibiotic free so if you see it on your food label, you're paying extra for nothing in return. 

While some food additives have unfamiliar names and are demonized left and right, the truth is that food and color additives are more strictly studied, regulated and monitored than at any other time in history. Those that spread the fear of additives, GMOs, non-organic foods, etc. cite rodent studies where the rate or mice were fed hundreds to thousands of times more of a given substance than are allowed in any food. In reality, those additives are at such low levels in foods, the risk is minimal. You have a better chance of getting e-coli from broccoli than an illness from additives. The ingredient/food is never the poison, it's the dose. 

Why live in fear when it comes to food? 

 

 

... I over stated ALL sugar and have edited my post, sorry about that. I can supply link after link form health sources and you can provide link after link from the food industry refuting them.  I have educated myself on what food is and the thousands of years of farming and hunting compared to the last decade of chemically laden food like substances from Agro Biz that have created a very sick and obese country.  But I do not live in fear of food like substances masquerading as food, much the opposite we know our farmers and ranchers and really enjoy cooking and eating great food. 

... I have been down this road on another golf forum and agree we should leave this at we disagree. The 3 people I "fought" with about this worked for Monsanto, Kraft and owned a grocery store and we ended up quite adversarial and I don't care to go down that road again. 

... For anyone else reading this, I highly reccomend starting out with 2 documentaries Food Inc and Food Matters. I think they can change your life. Previews below:

 

 

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8 hours ago, pulledabill said:

Congrats..do you IF every day? Im laying here in bed with black coffee thinking to not IF today as its my day off, but Im feeling okay if I decide to IF. I tried to find  info on when to stop an IF for a day or two time wise. Im eating10a-6p.

Not every day for me. I have moved my eating window a few times but right now I eat early stop around 1pm after lunch. I am picking back up to 3-4 days a week to start losing again. 

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... Congrats to all of you trying to make positive changes in your life!!! I have always been very active and never got more than 20lbs over weight in winter but thankfully my family is extremely health conscious so I want to share a few things I have learned from them. 

... Agro Biz has really done a number on the American public. The most egregious is sugar. Sugar is a once in a blue moon treat and should most definitely not be included in anything but deserts. It is highly addictive, as much as cocaine and once in it's grip it is extremely difficult to do without it. Getting rid of ALL high fructose and most processed sugar in your diet is a really great place to start. 

... The bad news that most just don't want to hear or believe is food is not and was never supposed to be "delicious".  It is a real eye opener for most. Quite simply food is fuel and the nutrients in food are necessary for a healthy and active life style. Now the good news is once you change your palate, you will find lost of really good tasting food you would have never thought possible. Kale, a superfood that is sooooo good for you gets a bad rap because raw it is tough and not very tasty. But massaging Kale, actually squeezing and breaking it down, and then adding virgin olive oil, cranberries/cherrries/raisens, lime/lemon juice and a little honey is one of our favorite foods and is really quite tasty! Green beans with some Fresno chillies and a baked potato slathered in grass fed butter and sour cream are excellent side dishes to Ribs, Burgers, Steaks, Grilled Chicken and Pork Chops.

... The other good news is the reason most over eat is because their bodies are not getting the nutrients they need. If you eat a salad with fresh vegetables and an oil/vinegar/lemon dressing and a nice grass fed steak or burger (sans bun) and some broccoli bathed in grass fed butter you will enjoy the meal and be satiated until your next meal because you are getting the fat and protein your body needs. But eat some CAFO meat of any kind (Concentrated Animal Feeding Operation) that is stripped of nutrients as well as added chemicals and hormones for cows standing in there own feces, with some boxed Mac and Cheese and some chips and a sugary desert and your body still wants more nutrients NOT more food so you eat more, because what you ate is not really food. Once you change your eating habits to nutrients that you need, instead of food-like-substances that you want you can eat as much as you like because when the body gets the nutrients it needs, you cease to be hungry. Ever eat a box of flavored crackers but you are still hungry? You have triggered your body's need for nutrients but there are so few in processed foods that your body still wants more, More, MORE!

... And more good news is you can eat salt, just not table salt that has all the minerals stripped out and adds iodine, but Himalayan Sea Salt that has 84 natural minerals that balance the sodium and has no detrimental effect, in fact quite the opposite as our bodies need salt for basic cellular function. 

... Eat organic or better yet grow your own vegetables. Find a local rancher that provides grass fed beef and pastured chicken and pork. We eat a TON of meat from a rancher/farmer we know in Iowa and we are all in excellent health. It isn't cheap but that is the scam Ago Biz has pulled on the American public, because food never was cheap. If it is cheap, it isn't real food.

... I used to be a typical American male eating fast food and all the junk corporations have produced for profit knowing full well it is bad for us. Once I saw the light, thanks to my wife and 2 boys about 10 years ago, I have been happily surprised by just how good REAL FOOD tastes and again YOU CAN EAT AS MUCH AS YOU WANT because once you get the nutrients you need, you just aren't hungry. That said, the hard part is giving up the sh!t that passes for food, ridding you body of its chemical addiction and then taking the time to make good food a priority. We are the fattest and sickest country in the world because we don't eat nutritional food, we eat junk. 

... I could go on and on but hopefully you get the idea. Sorry for this soapbox post but I think it is just so very important to truly understand what real food is, why we eat crap and why we are so over weight and so sick. You are posting and reading this thread so you must want to be healthier. The change isn't easy, but once you dedicate yourself to real food and a healthy diet you will find real food actually tastes great and after some time away, gong back and trying to eat processed junk is impossible because it isn't food and it states terrible, like a mouth full of foul chemicals. I used to eat Cheese Puffs by the barrel and now they taste like garbage. I wish all of you the best of luck in your journey to better health! 


All I’ve done is a modified form of this sprinkled with moderate exercise and fish (I live where you can take a poll spend an hour in the water and bring dinner home). Lost 45 in 9 months and have kept it off for a year with no hiccups.

I keep seeing stuff lake fasting or fad type things pop up. It reminds me of our golf threads where without professional advice we cut our clubs, change our swing, buy a 700 driver because it works for Rory or whatever else.

My advice here is the same as for golf - consult your doctor and ask him to recommend a fitness expert - like a trainer - there are even golf specific trainers if you’d like to double up. As an added bonus your health insurance may cover your fitness program.

If you are struggling to keep the weight off it’s because you need a lifestyle change. The dads don’t work.

165.7 today - less than I weighed in college. I ate fish twice yesterday - it was delicious


Sent from my iPhone using MyGolfSpy
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On 10/2/2019 at 5:19 PM, chisag said:

 

... I over stated ALL sugar and have edited my post, sorry about that. I can supply link after link form health sources and you can provide link after link from the food industry refuting them.  I have educated myself on what food is and the thousands of years of farming and hunting compared to the last decade of chemically laden food like substances from Agro Biz that have created a very sick and obese country.  But I do not live in fear of food like substances masquerading as food, much the opposite we know our farmers and ranchers and really enjoy cooking and eating great food. 

... I have been down this road on another golf forum and agree we should leave this at we disagree. The 3 people I "fought" with about this worked for Monsanto, Kraft and owned a grocery store and we ended up quite adversarial and I don't care to go down that road again. 

... For anyone else reading this, I highly reccomend starting out with 2 documentaries Food Inc and Food Matters. I think they can change your life. Previews below:

 

 

I'm more than happy to let sleeping dogs lie, but if you're going to leave a rebuttal with those documentaries, I'd like to offer my final rebuttal as well...a challenge, if you will.

Anyone can offer nutritional advice because of social media. While the vast majority have no business offering up nutrition advice that either flies in the face of science or is complete hoakum, you can find those that practice and study nutrition on a daily basis if you know what to look for. Look for people who are registered dietitians (RD, RDN, MSRDN), have masters or PhDs in nutrition science, have a degree in chemical engineering with a focus on food science, etc....something that would equate years of study and are in the nutrition field every day of their life. Would you take legal advice from a sports broadcaster that dabbles in law? Would you take nutrition advice from an author or mommy blogger? Would you take golf club/ball advice from a doctor? Hopefully you'd be cautious in all of those scenarios and that's what leads me to these documentaries. 

Food Inc was written by Robert Kenner (film producer), Elise Pearlstein (film producer) and Kim Roberts (film writer). Food Inc touts the leading men, Eric Schlosser and Michael Pollan, as their 'experts'. Well, the first challenge is to look at their backgrounds and see if these men have any sort of nutritional background. Both are authors. Eric has written books on the Syrian conflict. Michael Pollan has written many self-help books. Do either spend their days in the world of nutrition or do they focus on one subject for a few months and then hop over to the next? Who would you take advice from? Someone who practices nutrition every day or someone who took an interest for a year or so and is now onto something else? I'll let you make that call. 

Food Matters was produced by, well, Food Matters, a natural health and wellness company in Australia. Food Matters is owned and operated by vegans. They push natural health and their 'expert'  PhD has written books that are aptly titled: Fire Your Doctor! and Doctor Yourself, a Natural Healing that Works. Do you know what we call alternative/natural medicine that works? Medicine. If going vegan helps you get to that healthy weight, then go for it, but the vegan lifestyle is one that is notorious for being malnourished. The diet lacks key nutrients like iron, vitamin B12, omega-3s, zinc and Vitamin D. Also, if you're comfortable taking advice from folks who don't think you need to go to your doctor, then have at it. I, personally, trust my doctor and my health is dependent on someone who believes in western medicine. 

There are other folks out there that have disguised themselves as nutrition experts, yet have no background or expertise other than trying to make a buck off the uninformed public. Please, please, please do your homework next time you see someone touting nutrition information. Also, look up research studies on topics you have questions about. Most of it is published online for free. Question about sugar? Look up studies and read the entire study, not just the summary. Questions about the safety of certain ingredients? Chances are someone has done a study on it. My wife is a registered dietitian and we receive the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics on a monthly basis. Just this past month they had a long-term study published about food exposure in childhood and how it relates to neophobia in college. It's fascinating stuff and it's all free. 

Science is not the enemy. In fact, the irony is that science has gotten us to a point where we are living longer and healthier than ever before, yet some want to deny that very science and go against it because it fits their personal narrative. 

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The Obesity Code: Unlocking the Secrets of Weight Loss 

The Diabetes Code.

 The Complete Guide to Fasting.(with Jimmy Moore).

The lead or sole author of each title is Dr. Jason Fung, M.D. He studied biochemistry at the University of Toronto where he also completed medical school and his residency in internal medicine. After residency he studied nephrology (kidney disease) at the University of California, L.A. Mostly at Cedar Sinai Medical Centre and West Los Angeles VA Medical Centers (then known as theVA Wadsworth).

Sufficient qualifications for me to carefully consider the opinions of this specialist. BTW, each book is replete with references to the numerous studies on these subjects, many of which were contradictory. Explanations regarding how contradictions occur are provided. For anyone looking for a thoughtful and in-depth professional opinion on these topics this is reading that I, as a layman, am happy to recommend.

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Well, I got the treadmill Saturday and got it into the basement by myself...heavy little bugger too.

First go on it this morning. I'm really liking the weight loss setting as it automatically inclines to simulate hills and made me work up a little bit of a sweat going at 3.5 mph.

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Well, I got the treadmill Saturday and got it into the basement by myself...heavy little bugger too.

First go on it this morning. I'm really liking the weight loss setting as it automatically inclines to simulate hills and made me work up a little bit of a sweat going at 3.5 mph.



Great job! ♂️


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On 9/21/2019 at 11:31 AM, skrupa15 said:

Thanks everyone for the great responses.  It's been a really good few days since my post.  I'm focusing on what I can reasonably do before the wedding: count calories, limit salt, make healthier choices, be more active.  I'm already encouraged by your support.  

@Pug, despite taking such poor care of myself, my blood glucose is fine.  But I do have a family history of diabetes so it's something that's always on my mind.

You’re off to a great start. You will find there can be many different paths to get to where you want to be. Intermittent fasting, for example, is not for everyone, and there are numerous variations on that theme. I think that it’s important that you have made a start. Processed carbs (as opposed to those naturally occurring in whole foods) and added sugars are my personal bug bear, but we each have our own.

Like anyone who became badly de-conditioned will tell you, the hardest thing about working out 🏋️♀️ is getting through the gym door!  The same applies to cleaning up our diet. Starting is the hard part.

Good luck.

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On 10/2/2019 at 12:40 PM, RickyBobby_PR said:

IF has no set rules other than the types of IF. 16:8, 20:4 or a 24 hour fast 1-2x/week. 

IF is nothing more than one way to control caloric intake and usually used to make eating in a deficit easier, but it’s possible to over eat in using IF.

 

You might also check out The Complete Guide to Fasting by Dr Jason Fung and Jimmy Moore. It covers a wide range of fasting modalities and stresses the need to fit fasting around your life, and not to fit your life around fasting. I committed to a fairly rigorous 36 hour fasting schedule three times a week. I start after dinner on Sunday night, fast Tuesday through to breakfast on Wednesday. Repeat fasting through Thursday to breakfast Friday than again starting Friday after dinner.

 I started that regimen 21 Sept. On 14 October my doctor took me off my diabetes medication. This is just a test to see if I can keep my blood glucose under 5.9.  I will assess again in 5 weeks to determine if a longer fast in the 4 to 5 day range is required to break through insulin resistance or if my current regime has done it. If so, I will reduce the fasting duration to 24 hours two or three times a week  and adjust as required.

 I was Type 2 Diabetic for at least the last 7 years. 

Chalk one up for intermittent fasting.

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I'm gonna try to keep this short. First....I've never been grossly over weight or obese. I'll be turning 50 in July 2020. On Thanksgiving morning of 2018, I hauled my ass to the gym and have done it 4-5 times per week all year. In just over a week from now, will be 1 year since "I" decided to change. This is the key point....I didn't decide to go on a diet....I didn't decide to try a new wonder pill.....I drug my butt out of bed and went to the gym. It was hard at first......but, started seeing results just inside of 60 days. Started at 212 lbs. Today, I weighed in at 192.4 lbs and down 2" in waist size. I have lost lots of fat and am up in muscle. My strength and flexibility is WAY better and I'm sleeping like a baby again. I haven't changed my diet all that much really.....just making better decisions. Staying away from bread as often as I can (But I friggin love bread). I honestly can't remember the last time I felt this good....would have to go back to my late 20's for sure. Coincidentally, my golf game is as good as it's been in a long time. Handicap has been trending down for several months. Started 2019 as a 12...as of today, I'm at 6.6. I attribute a lot of this to my weight loss and increase in flexibility. Lastly, I'd like to add that this has happened by lifting weights, not walking on a treadmill. I hate cardio and typically use a bike or elliptical 10-15 minutes (rigorous) a couple times per month. I get plenty heart rate elevation lifting.

Good luck to any and all who make an attempt improving your health!! It's a mindset....convince yourself your going to make a lifestyle change....not go on a diet!

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16 minutes ago, dalejbrass said:

I'm gonna try to keep this short. First....I've never been grossly over weight or obese. I'll be turning 50 in July 2020. On Thanksgiving morning of 2018, I hauled my ass to the gym and have done it 4-5 times per week all year. In just over a week from now, will be 1 year since "I" decided to change. This is the key point....I didn't decide to go on a diet....I didn't decide to try a new wonder pill.....I drug my butt out of bed and went to the gym. It was hard at first......but, started seeing results just inside of 60 days. Started at 212 lbs. Today, I weighed in at 192.4 lbs and down 2" in waist size. I have lost lots of fat and am up in muscle. My strength and flexibility is WAY better and I'm sleeping like a baby again. I haven't changed my diet all that much really.....just making better decisions. Staying away from bread as often as I can (But I friggin love bread). I honestly can't remember the last time I felt this good....would have to go back to my late 20's for sure. Coincidentally, my golf game is as good as it's been in a long time. Handicap has been trending down for several months. Started 2019 as a 12...as of today, I'm at 6.6. I attribute a lot of this to my weight loss and increase in flexibility. Lastly, I'd like to add that this has happened by lifting weights, not walking on a treadmill. I hate cardio and typically use a bike or elliptical 10-15 minutes (rigorous) a couple times per month. I get plenty heart rate elevation lifting.

Good luck to any and all who make an attempt improving your health!! It's a mindset....convince yourself your going to make a lifestyle change....not go on a diet!

Congrats on the improvements.  As you mention it’s really a lifestyle change and not a diet that will result in changes. Nutrition is key but those who approach as a diet tend to fail because it’s unsustainable. I’m a firm believer in for flexible dieting and macro counting. 
 

unless you have some sort of allergy or health condition that is affected by eating bread I say enjoy it and just account for it in your daily calories. 

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16 hours ago, dalejbrass said:

I'm gonna try to keep this short. First....I've never been grossly over weight or obese. I'll be turning 50 in July 2020. On Thanksgiving morning of 2018, I hauled my ass to the gym and have done it 4-5 times per week all year. In just over a week from now, will be 1 year since "I" decided to change. This is the key point....I didn't decide to go on a diet....I didn't decide to try a new wonder pill.....I drug my butt out of bed and went to the gym. It was hard at first......but, started seeing results just inside of 60 days. Started at 212 lbs. Today, I weighed in at 192.4 lbs and down 2" in waist size. I have lost lots of fat and am up in muscle. My strength and flexibility is WAY better and I'm sleeping like a baby again. I haven't changed my diet all that much really.....just making better decisions. Staying away from bread as often as I can (But I friggin love bread). I honestly can't remember the last time I felt this good....would have to go back to my late 20's for sure. Coincidentally, my golf game is as good as it's been in a long time. Handicap has been trending down for several months. Started 2019 as a 12...as of today, I'm at 6.6. I attribute a lot of this to my weight loss and increase in flexibility. Lastly, I'd like to add that this has happened by lifting weights, not walking on a treadmill. I hate cardio and typically use a bike or elliptical 10-15 minutes (rigorous) a couple times per month. I get plenty heart rate elevation lifting.

Good luck to any and all who make an attempt improving your health!! It's a mindset....convince yourself your going to make a lifestyle change....not go on a diet!

I don’t know what impressed me more: loosing 20 pounds or taking 6 strokes off your handicap 👏👏👏👏👏

I am also in the lifestyle works diets fail camp on this topic.

Well done 👍

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On 11/16/2019 at 7:33 AM, Pug said:

I don’t know what impressed me more: loosing 20 pounds or taking 6 strokes off your handicap 👏👏👏👏👏

I am also in the lifestyle works diets fail camp on this topic.

Well done 👍

LOL. Thank you sir. Yeah....sounds like a lot. Truth is....I’m just now getting back to where I once was at a 6 handicap. I had hip replacement surgery 8/16....so, didn’t play much golf for about a 3 year period. Fast forward several years and I now live on the 18th green of a country club and have my own cart.....which equates to lots of practice time. The weight loss and the strength gain has equated to better move through the ball and my ball striking is pretty crisp right now.

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So I had a bit of a back slide - got up to 168 (which was my target weight when I started my program.). I’ve hit it hard the last couple of weeks and am now back under 166. I’d like to get it under 165. That’s where I was living most of last year.

Remember that summer in Florida is like winter for most of you. It’s tough to stay active. Now it’s beautiful and the activity level has gone way up.


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I don't know, Rev.

People grow.

I boxed as a welterweight in novice class, middleweight in open class, and light-heavyweight as a club pro.

[This was a million years ago, of course.]

Now, anything under 240 is doing really well from my perspective.

Otherwise, I have to give up bread, pasta, potatoes, pastry, and Guinness for a while.

You're too hard on yourself!

 

 

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"Atomic Habits," by James Clear.  Subtitled "Tiny Changes, Remarkable Results," and "An easy and Proven Way to Build Good Habits and Break Bad ones."

I first became aware of the book "Atomic Habits" through golf websites.  It was recommended by a several instructors/writers because of it's application to improvement in golf.  (Google "atomic habits golf" to find the different articles.)

 

I then started seeing references to the book on weight loss sites and fitness sites.  (Google "atomic habits weight loss", "atomic habits diet", and "atomic habits fitness.")  

 

I finally downloaded and read the book.  I highly recommend it.  

 

It is not a golf book, or diet book or fitness guide.  It looks at habits--those things we do during the day without really thinking about them.   It helped me recognize all sorts of things I was doing out of habit, what triggered the habitual response and best of all, how to change the bad habit into good.  Small changes, but changes that lead to big changes.  

 

I recommend the book, for golf and for weight loss.  

 

 

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On 11/26/2019 at 12:47 PM, NiftyNiblick said:

I don't know, Rev.

People grow.

I boxed as a welterweight in novice class, middleweight in open class, and light-heavyweight as a club pro.

[This was a million years ago, of course.]

Now, anything under 240 is doing really well from my perspective.

Otherwise, I have to give up bread, pasta, potatoes, pastry, and Guinness for a while.

You're too hard on yourself!

 

 

Give up Guinness? That’s a putt too far for me. The first 4 on your list, no problem, but giving up Guinness? I doubt if life would be worth living...

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On 11/17/2019 at 7:29 PM, dalejbrass said:

LOL. Thank you sir. Yeah....sounds like a lot. Truth is....I’m just now getting back to where I once was at a 6 handicap. I had hip replacement surgery 8/16....so, didn’t play much golf for about a 3 year period. Fast forward several years and I now live on the 18th green of a country club and have my own cart.....which equates to lots of practice time. The weight loss and the strength gain has equated to better move through the ball and my ball striking is pretty crisp right now.

I can relate to the reduction in your playing time - I also had a hip replaced  on 6 Dec 2018. The surgery didn’t go well and I am still using a cane. Tough getting a decent cardio workout when you can’t walk unassisted. I lost about 35 yards off of drives and fairways became erratically elusive. I am working on getting it back. Good for you for persevering. I intend to do the same.

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