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New handicap system coming - WHS

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Allowing non competition rounds to be entered will be a massive cultural shift for Australian golf. That is by far the biggest change for us.

Peaksy - A couple of questions:

 

1. How frequently does your club hold tournaments?

2. How frequently do daily-fee courses hold tournaments?

3. How much are entry fees?

 

I need further education on this, but it's my understanding that clubs/courses in Australia hold tournaments far more frequently than we do in the US. Which I think is great for you and bad for us. I'd love to be able to play a competitive round once a week, even if it's just a Stableford or a stroke-play with a maximum score for a hole. It'd make me a much better player.

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Peaksy - A couple of questions:1. How frequently does your club hold tournaments?2. How frequently do daily-fee courses hold tournaments?3. How much are entry fees?I need further education on this, but it's my understanding that clubs/courses in Australia hold tournaments far more frequently than we do in the US. Which I think is great for you and bad for us. I'd love to be able to play a competitive round once a week, even if it's just a Stableford or a stroke-play with a maximum score for a hole. It'd make me a much better player.

My club is probably typical of most private clubs.

 

Competition run most days.

 

Monday Men's and Women's ~75 men, 20 women

Tuesday Women's 9 hole ~ 20

Wednesday Men's ~ 140

Thursday Womens ~ 75

Saturday Mens and Women's ~180 men 20 women

Sunday Mens and Women's, smaller fields with mostly green fee and social groups on the timesheet.

 

Men's Saturday competitions are roughly half Stableford, a quarter each Strokeplay and Par. We have an occasional 4BBB thrown in as well.Mid week competitions are rarely Strokeplay.

We pay a competition fee each competition of $7 plus $1 for the "golden shot" which is winner take all for NTP on our 17th hole. About 3/4 of competition fees are returned as prizes.

 

We have major events, which usually involve a qualifying round and then Matchplay (handicap)

Club Championships are now running as 3 rounds of Strokeplay. First Saturday of each season is quarterly medal, which is always Strokeplay.

 

Competitions (other than Quarterly medal) are graded, with 2,3 or 4 grades depending on the size of the field.

 

Our results are automatically sent through to the handicapping system on completion of the competition, and are adjusted daily.

 

I play 30-40 competition rounds a year, plus the occasional matchplay round.

 

Daily fee courses don't often run competitions, but a lot of them have "clubs" associated with them that run their own competitions. Some have regular "black tee challenge" type events at reduced rates, and the better ones attract good fields.

 

A lot of private clubs have Tournament Weeks, with lots of events. These are mostly run by country clubs as a means of attracting visitors.

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Peaksy - A couple of questions:

 

1. How frequently does your club hold tournaments?

2. How frequently do daily-fee courses hold tournaments?

3. How much are entry fees?

 

I need further education on this, but it's my understanding that clubs/courses in Australia hold tournaments far more frequently than we do in the US. Which I think is great for you and bad for us. I'd love to be able to play a competitive round once a week, even if it's just a Stableford or a stroke-play with a maximum score for a hole. It'd make me a much better player.

 

We have a similar case in Germany.

 

Only competitive rounds count towards your HCP. All golf clubs are members of the German Golf Federation and they provide an intranet that syncs your tournament rounds, no matter where you play. During competitive rounds, you'll always have someone keeping score for you and after the round, you both sign the score cards. Yeah, it's not cheater-proof, but at least you don't just submit whatever you want as a single.

 

If you feel there are not enough competitive rounds, you can always register for an EDS round (extra day score) which makes the round competitive. You'll need at least a witness that keeps score for you and signs the card after the round.

 

Most clubs will hold at least 1 competitive round per week (usually weekends). Then you have after-work tournaments, men's day, women's day, etc. If you are a member of the club, entry fees are usually EUR 5-10. Usually prizes for the first 3 places depending on partcipants.

 

If you fancy, playing a competitive round somewhere else, you can do so as well and your score will be submitted directly to the Golf Federation and sync with your home course.

 

There are both Stableford and stroke-play events (both count as competitive rounds). Stableford rounds use this system to determine both HCP and winner. Stroke-play rounds will use Stableford for HCP, and obviously strokes to determine winner.

 

Now, since many of you asked about weather, here's how they do it in Germany:

 

It's basically just a curve that adjusts the results of that round based on all scores submitted and compared to the average. The first version was CSA (Competition Stableford Adjustment) and it was then replaced by CBA (Computer Buffer Adjustment).

 

In case you are not familiar with Stableford, that awards 3 pts for birdie, 2 pts for par, 1 pt for bogey and 0 pts for anything worse than bogey (net). So regardless of HCP, the ideal scenario is you shoot (net) par, which would be 36 pts for 18 holes.

 

We then have index categories (not sure if it's like this globally or only EGA):

 

Category 1: up to -4.4

Category 2: -4.5 to -11.4

Category 3: -11.5 to -18.4

Category 4: -18.5 to 26.4

Category 5: -26.5 to -36

Category 6: -37 to -54

 

If you shoot over 36 pts, HCP will go down (how much depends on the index category)

If you fail to shoot 36 pts, your HCP will increase.

But you have a buffer where your HCP doesn't change:

 

Category 1: 2

Category 2: 2

Category 3: 3

Category 4: 4

Category 5: 5

Category 6: -

 

That means if you have a HCP of 15, category 3, you can shoot between 33 and 36 pts and it will not affect your HCP.

 

So let's say it was a shitty rainy day with extreme low temps and most players shot 1 or 2 pts below their buffer zone.

Instead of adjusting the HCP of the whole field, they'll modify the buffer zone with CBA by let's say +2 strokes.

 

In the example above, the guy shoots 31 pts, but with CBA +2, his HCP won't be affected. And this applies to all players that day.

 

CSA used to add the +2 to your score, CBA now only changes the buffer zone. Your score is your score.

Sorry for the long explanation, I wasn't sure if the EGA rules were known in other countries.

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I'm intrigued by the weather component.

 

It makes sense to have all world handicaps calculated the same way. 8/20 rather than 10 plus the other changes will lower handicaps. That's good news for guys who are honest about their scores.

 

Always remember that your handicap measures your potential, not what you normally shoot. It also compares to course rating and not par.

 

I like the changes

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using MyGolfSpy

I read an article that said the new handicaps actually will be based off of par rather than course rating, but I don't see that anywhere in the USGA rollout.

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I read an article that said the new handicaps actually will be based off of par rather than course rating, but I don't see that anywhere in the USGA rollout.

If you look closer, you'll see that the USGA Course Rating and Slope system will be used.

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If you look closer, you'll see that the USGA Course Rating and Slope system will be used.

 If you look closer lol? Daaaamn Dave

 

Here's what I was referring to. It's a Golf Digest article from yesterday

https://www.golfdigest.com/story/usga-randa-unveil-new-world-handicap-system-set-to-debut-in-2020

 

The part that caught my eye is (emphasis and italics theirs): The new formula, which will count both nine- and 18-hole scores, will use a course's Slope and Rating and will continue to produce an Index based off a players' potential that's then translated to a “playing handicap” for each set of tees at each course. One difference: These playing handicaps will represent the number of strokes a golfer gets in relation to par, rather than Course Rating,

 

So if I'm reading that correctly it seems that guys playing at tougher courses can expect their "playing handicap" number to go up?

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 If you look closer lol? Daaaamn Dave

 

Here's what I was referring to. It's a Golf Digest article from yesterday

https://www.golfdigest.com/story/usga-randa-unveil-new-world-handicap-system-set-to-debut-in-2020

 

The part that caught my eye is (emphasis and italics theirs): The new formula, which will count both nine- and 18-hole scores, will use a course's Slope and Rating and will continue to produce an Index based off a players' potential that's then translated to a “playing handicap” for each set of tees at each course. One difference: These playing handicaps will represent the number of strokes a golfer gets in relation to par, rather than Course Rating,

 

So if I'm reading that correctly it seems that guys playing at tougher courses can expect their "playing handicap" number to go up?

 

Isn't that already the way it works now?

You have an index and depending which tees you play from, you have a number of strokes in relation to par

Example: you are a 10.0, so on this course from the black tees you get 15 strokes

vorgabe.JPG

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 If you look closer lol? Daaaamn Dave

 

Here's what I was referring to. It's a Golf Digest article from yesterday

https://www.golfdigest.com/story/usga-randa-unveil-new-world-handicap-system-set-to-debut-in-2020

 

The part that caught my eye is (emphasis and italics theirs): The new formula, which will count both nine- and 18-hole scores, will use a course's Slope and Rating and will continue to produce an Index based off a players' potential that's then translated to a “playing handicap” for each set of tees at each course. One difference: These playing handicaps will represent the number of strokes a golfer gets in relation to par, rather than Course Rating,

 

So if I'm reading that correctly it seems that guys playing at tougher courses can expect their "playing handicap" number to go up?

My apologies, I was reading the actual release from the USGA (duplicated by the R&A) that makes it clear that the USGA rating system (Course and Slope Ratings) would be used.  For those of us in the US, especially at higher handicap levels, we're accustomed to receiving an additional stroke or two when playing a course with a higher slope rating.  The effect is minimal for a 1-handicap like you, but for a 25 handicapper it can be pretty significant.

 

For those where Slope hasn't been used before, its essentially intended to evaluate the difference in difficulty for players of differing handicap levels.  A top level player just might average 72 on two different courses, even though one has more bunkers or hazards, because he doesn't hit it into those problem spots.  A 18 handicapper, on the other hand, might average 92 on a straightforward course with minimal problem areas, and average 95 on a course with lots of bunkers or water.  The Slope Rating is an effort to quantify that effect.  There's some reasonable information at:

http://popeofslope.com/courserating/sysdev.html

and lots of detail here:

http://www.usga.org/handicapping-articles/course-rating-primer-e5bf725f.html

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One problem not addressed is home course advantage. I play with a group at the same course every week. When I play the occasional course that I am not familiar with, I generally shoot about 3 strokes higher. They always ask to categorize your scores, why not have a home, away and tournament handicaps. 

 

Keep in mind the opposite is true. A golfer with the same index unfamiliar with my course, has no shot at beating me.

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It makes sense there is no reason to have more than one way to figure out a players handicap. Don't know why they didn't do this sooner.

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I suppose I don't have much of a dog in this hunt. I don't play tournament golf much any longer. I keep a handicap still but it's only because I might want to play in our club championship this summer. (but the way they run our club I don't think it even matters) Honestly and I hate to admit.... it's not accurate at this time because I don't turn in scores regularly anymore. It's probably about 2 points high. 99% of my golf is out at the club with the usual gang. We don't play handicap golf. Everything is heads-up. Even when I travel my handicap isn't even a thought and I don't turn in cards from those courses either.

I used to chase a lower handicap but found it put pressure on my game. After I gave that up my handicap/scores dropped.

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Peaksy/Kanoito - Thanks so much for your great explanation of how things are done in your country. As a comparison, I turn in about 50 scores a year, but if 10 of then are tournament scores, it's a lot. I wish that weekly, low entry fee competitions were a regular feature of American golf.

 

I have friends in clubs that have regular games that, I suppose, are somewhat similar to what described. But not at the public course where I play most of my golf.

 

Time to talk to our pro.

 

Sent from my SM-J727VPP using Tapatalk

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I like the changes. It makes the system significantly less complex when traveling abroad and also paves the way to making golf a truly global sport.

 

With all the talk about shorter rounds and the rising interest in pay-for-play structures, I'd be curious if there are any talks about changing what constitutes a round for the purposes of handicapping. Also, I quite enjoy they increase in maximum handicaps - it shows the governing bodies recognize how difficult the game can be and the fact that complete duffers make up a large swath of the golfing population.

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