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willc1980

Opinions on what clubs to replace first

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Ok, sorry for the long story in advance

 

Im recently (like a month ago) back to the game since my teens, i have played a little as an adult but pretty much just to drink beer. So now i want to play and learn a bit more seriously.

 

Currently in the bag I have an old Nike Ignite driver, probably over 12 years old, and Nike Slingshot OSS irons, probably 10 years old? So my instructor says to replace the driver first but im at a point where my driver game is struggling and i dont wanna go drop a chunk on money on a club im going to slice anyway. So will a new driver make that much of a difference in hitting the ball straighter? do I spend the money on more modern irons because i hit them better right now? or leave everything alone unltil i can hit everything I have straightish? and go!

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You can buy some lightly used stuff and get both for the price of just one. Irons are used more so you can go that route or you can go the route of the one that starts the hole. You'll get some good ideas and different opinions but I know the feeling about the driver issue I'm in the same boat

 

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You can buy a new to you driver and irons that are a year or two old and get a better bang for your buck.

 

You could also go to another fitter and pay for a fitting to see if you are leaving performance on the table with your current clubs. Better to spend 50 or 100 bucks on a fitting than a couple hundred to a thousand dollars on new clubs when you might not see performance games from new clubs.

 

A fitting would also give you an idea of what to look for on the used market if you don't want to buy new

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You can buy a new to you driver and irons that are a year or two old and get a better bang for your buck.

 

You could also go to another fitter and pay for a fitting to see if you are leaving performance on the table with your current clubs. Better to spend 50 or 100 bucks on a fitting than a couple hundred to a thousand dollars on new clubs when you might not see performance games from new clubs.

 

A fitting would also give you an idea of what to look for on the used market if you don't want to buy new

yea i hear ya on a fitting i just dont know that i can hit enough balls straight with a driver to make it worth while lol

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yea i hear ya on a fitting i just dont know that i can hit enough balls straight with a driver to make it worth while lol

Check out this video. Should provide you with everything you need need to know. I think you'll be surprised how much a fitting could benefit you

 

https://youtu.be/G7LGlJNMuC8

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How serious are you about really getting back into it? Inevitably, if you play a lot, your swing will change. You would hate to get new clubs now then have your swing change in a few months and the new ones would no longer be the right fit. Here's what I might do: work super hard the next couple of months and you will have definitely improved. Then try out a bunch of clubs on a launch monitor and see what gets you the best results. But if you think that is not what you are looking for, then maybe try replacing the driver. I think the difference will be greater than switching irons. Just be sure to test out a bunch of them!

 

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While new clubs may help, they aren't necessarily going to completely change your game. If you don't end up getting fitted and you are looking to just upgrade your clubs, there are tons of sites out there to buy used clubs from, which I highly recommend. You can maybe do what I did when I first started. I set a goal, I told myself whenever I was able to par every hole (not consecutively), I would buy myself a new set of irons. This drove me to practice more, because I desperately wanted to get rid of those Top Flites. 

 

Anyway if you do go the pre-owned route, check out these sites, if you don't already know of them:

 

http://www.callawaygolfpreowned.com/

https://www.globalgolf.com/

https://www.2ndswing.com/

https://www.taylormadegolfpreowned.com/

https://www.3balls.com/

 

You can usually find some great deals, especially Callaway PreOwned when they have special sales going on. 

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While new clubs may help, they aren't necessarily going to completely change your game. If you don't end up getting fitted and you are looking to just upgrade your clubs, there are tons of sites out there to buy used clubs from, which I highly recommend. You can maybe do what I did when I first started. I set a goal, I told myself whenever I was able to par every hole (not consecutively), I would buy myself a new set of irons. This drove me to practice more, because I desperately wanted to get rid of those Top Flites. 

 

Anyway if you do go the pre-owned route, check out these sites, if you don't already know of them:

 

http://www.callawaygolfpreowned.com/

https://www.globalgolf.com/

https://www.2ndswing.com/

https://www.taylormadegolfpreowned.com/

https://www.3balls.com/

 

You can usually find some great deals, especially Callaway PreOwned when they have special sales going on. 

i dont really have intentions of buying a new driver without a fit, my concern was my swing being "good" enough to hit balls consistently for evaluation

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If that's the case, then I would just get a little practice in until you have a repeatable swing that you're comfortable with.

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Check out this video. Should provide you with everything you need need to know. I think you'll be surprised how much a fitting could benefit you

 

dude......that video plus the high handicap driver fitting one make me wanna run out tomorrow and spend $$$ lol

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Have to agree with the majority here. I may also suggest an updated or new wedges as well. Inevitably you will be chipping/pitching and hitting a lot of shots inside 100 yds. New grooves will help you hold a few more greens while your getting back at it.

 

In regards to other clubs, I'm not sure irons will play all that much different until your swing is more grooved but with the driver there are a lot of adjustable options out there that will help with a slice and as you get better you can adjust to more neutral.

 

Good luck on your return.

 

 

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Another benefit of a good fitting is that the fitter can suggest changes to the set make-up of your bag; for example if you haven't played in a while have you hit a hybrid? Or game improvement irons with graphite shafts?

 

Also, IMHO, would suggest you consider making step-by-step changes to your bag from the bottom up ... eg. maybe demo some newer putters first, then look at some wedges, then different types of irons, then maybe hybrids (or fairway woods).

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So my instructor says to replace the driver first but im at a point where my driver game is struggling and i dont wanna go drop a chunk on money on a club im going to slice anyway. 

 

I think your answer is here,  talk to your instructor.  A slice isn't the result of a particular driver unless you have a shaft that is really bad for your swing.  A slice is caused by face angle and club path.  Fix that and you can hit most drivers straight.  A newer more forgiving driver will help you not lose distance on mishits.  As others have said, it doesn't have to be a break the bank kind of thing;  you can get some great inexpensive drivers that are a couple of years old.  

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I think your answer is here,  talk to your instructor.  A slice isn't the result of a particular driver unless you have a shaft that is really bad for your swing.  A slice is caused by face angle and club path.  Fix that and you can hit most drivers straight.  A newer more forgiving driver will help you not lose distance on mishits.  As others have said, it doesn't have to be a break the bank kind of thing;  you can get some great inexpensive drivers that are a couple of years old.  

right, but with the adjustability of weight and face angle of new drivers would i benefit?

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Frankly, I'm a bit dismayed that your instructor is pushing you into getting new clubs, or even a driver.

Because the reality is that no club is going to make you better or hit it straighter.

It's not the arrow, it's the indian.

It's not like technology has changed all that much in the last 10 or 15 years, it's not like your clubs are left-overs from the 1980s - and as others have suggested, it would be foolhardy on your part investing in clubs only to have your swing change and then you find out that the clubs you bought don't suit you any better than your old ones.

 

Spend your money this year on lessons and developing a swing, that's repeatable and playable, and then next year invest in new clubs.

I respectfully disagree. I do think newer clubs have a difference in performance. For me, I gained 20 yards when I switched from the TM R7 SuperQuad to the 2017 M1. That is a big difference. I am hitting PW into greens I might have originally been hitting 8i into. I think clubs make a difference, but developing a repeatable swing should be the first priority.

 

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Frankly, I'm a bit dismayed that your instructor is pushing you into getting new clubs, or even a driver.

Because the reality is that no club is going to make you better or hit it straighter.

It's not the arrow, it's the indian.

It's not like technology has changed all that much in the last 10 or 15 years, it's not like your clubs are left-overs from the 1980s - and as others have suggested, it would be foolhardy on your part investing in clubs only to have your swing change and then you find out that the clubs you bought don't suit you any better than your old ones.

 

Spend your money this year on lessons and developing a swing, that's repeatable and playable, and then next year invest in new clubs.

its much less of a push than it is a suggestion that if im going to replace something start with that because its the oldest and the newer designs would yield the most benefit?

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As someone who plays older clubs due to budget reasons, I can tell you that there are some GREAT options of older models for little $ nothing wrong with an older model driver that's new to you giving you some confidence on the tee box. I got my covert 2.0 new from eBay for $85 two years ago. Would recommend!

 

 

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Kudos to you for taking lessons.

 

I would follow his advice he's the professional, we aren't. From everything that I know about golf (much of which you be learned here) there is some good advice and very miss informed advice in this thread.

 

Getting fit is ideal, if not the next best thing would be to ask him what his recommendation would be in regards to driver and iron type. Driver first makes the most sense because it has the greatest impact on your score, putter next then wedges or irons.

 

Also because of the head size there is more technology in the driver.

 

Your budget will determine whether to buy new or slightly used (big savings and very little give away in terms of performance)

 

The proper equipment will help you advance quicker.

 

Listen to the Pro, good luck and let us know how it turns out.

 

 

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Thanks guys, I'm gonna go talk with the fitters at Miles of Golf before my range session today and just get some opinions.

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right, but with the adjustability of weight and face angle of new drivers would i benefit?

Weights and adjustability have been around a while and there are many options available that are less than 5 years old. They are great for fine tuning but will not turn a 30 yard slice into a straight ball flight.

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