Jump to content
Wedgie

Grilling

Recommended Posts

Just made pork chops on the grill for dinner. Over cooked and chewy, family is still hungry so headed out for ice cream. What is your go to grill recipe.

 

 

Sent from my iPad using MyGolfSpy

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Garlic Salt, Pepper, marinate in Teriyaki Sauce with some chopped onions. Doesn't really matter if its beef, chicken or pork.

 

Don't over cook, or with chicken and pork, don't under cook.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Marinate in white wine, soy sauce, ginger and garlic. For thick chops, you really need to go low and slow or you'll cook the hell out of them in order to cook out the pink. If you use charcoal, push it all over to one side of the grill and put the chops on the side without the coals so they're not getting direct flame. You can even put a water pan in the grill to moderate the temperature. Soak a handful of hickory chips in water and throw them on the coals.

 

If you use a gas grill, turn the back burner off and set the middle burner to medium. Put the chops toward the back, again away from the direct flame. And definitely throw a handful of soaked hickory chips in a smoker box.

 

Check out articles on two zone (indirect) grilling.

 

Alternatively, cook them sous vide style, and get your grill nuclear hot to get a good sear on each side. Foolproof!

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ahh..grilling...

 

Indeed the true pinnacle of the American back-yard cook-out. Most folks refer to this particular endeavor as "Bar-B-Que", but as my born-n-bred wife from Texas knows (and states): "grillin' ain't real BBQ!" I whole-heartedly agree...

 

Indeed there is a difference. To grill, is to do so on super-high heat with the lid open...quick and done. True "Q" must be "low-n-slow" with a little smoke and is really meant for big primal lumps or just plain bad cuts of the tough parts really (ribs, pork butt, brisket, etc.).

 

Unfortunately, the American "Bar-B-Que" get together almost always involves burgers, dogs and maybe even a chop or steak. Those events are really "grills". Fine.... But enough with the snobbiness… ^_^

 

My favorite is to get the best beef ribeye steaks possible, set them out until they reach room temperature, slather them with pure unsalted butter, Lawry's seasoned salt and a bit of pepper. Sear them off on a grill that's been at 5-600 degrees (or better) until 128-degrees internal temp. Serve with grilled whole corn on the cob, grilled asparagus, baked potato, chilled cantaloupe and garlic bread....

 

Your arteries will hate you, but yer taste buds will never wanna go back... :rolleyes:

 

Oh and don't forget the warm home-made peach cobbler with vanilla ice cream for desert please!!!!

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You didn't say if you're cooking on gas or charcoal, makes a difference.

 

Overcooked and chewy sounds like thin chops. For a gas grill, get it hot then turn it all the way down.

 

Spray the grill with your favorite non-stick substance and throw on the chops.

 

When you start to see juices coming through, flip'em. On the flip side, when you see clear juices, pull them off.

 

Works for me.

 

Seasoning? Lots of seasoned salt. Most of it will fall off during cooking.

 

 

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For me it is Boston Butts slow cooked over Hickory wood. I also use my own Eastern NC pepper vinegar based sauce. The vinegar based sauce makes the meat moist and tender. That is on my wood cooker. On my gas grille I do just about anything from ribs to steak. Also do a mean slow cooked pot roast wrapped in foil on the gas grille. One thing I do on a gas grill is when I get it hot I do put Hickory chips in to add flavor. Most weekends in good weather our stove/oven in the house is rarely fired up it is all the gas grill or the wood cooker

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Garlic Salt, Pepper, marinate in Teriyaki Sauce with some chopped onions. Doesn't really matter if its beef, chicken or pork.

 

Don't over cook, or with chicken and pork, don't under cook.

I like your style.

 

And don't flip the darn things 100 times! Leave them the heck alone haha.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using MyGolfSpy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When grilling if you think you cooked it too long you did. If it's undercooked you can always put it back on. If it's over cooked. Well then your going for ice cream.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using MyGolfSpy

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For the grill, I'm a charcoal guy. I do Bulgogi pork or a nice lamb shoulder chop.

 

For my griddle, it's Aussie beef sausages with caramelised onions or hamburgers.

 

For my smoker, it's everything...chicken, pulled pork, rib, brisket etc.

 

I just like cooking.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Brats... because I'm terrible at grilling.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Brats... because I'm terrible at grilling.

I'm grilling brats after church tomorrow evening.

 

For me the secret is always a spatula in one hand and a double scotch in the other.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using MyGolfSpy

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For me, no matter what it is, it's always fajita seasoning and seasonal salt. Steaks, chops, burgers, etc... Slow cooked!!

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using MyGolfSpy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've lived in Texas my whole life. I'd like to say that I'm a real pro on the grill or smoker; but I'm not. I've always wanted to master a slow smoked brisket but wasn't able to replicate others excellence. These days I rarely use my charcoal grill. Except for perhaps bbq'd chicken.

I much prefer to "grill" a steak in my ancient seasoned cast iron skillet. I keep seasoning of the steak to a minimum; mostly using only using salt and pepper. But using a cast iron skillet allows a steak to cook in it's own juices and the flavor and crust imparted can't be beat IMO. The same goes for burgers.

 

A quality cast iron skillet is a miracle worker in so many ways and for so many foods. If you don't have one get one. And if you're shopping; pay more to get more. That means quality. So many cast iron skillets produced these days have a rough surface. You don't want those. You want ones with a smooth surface but they are getting hard to find. I have a full set of CI skillets passed down to me from my mom. I'd guess they might be 80 years old... or more. She might have gotten them from her mom which would make them over 100!

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sounds like it could have been worse...you could have gone out for McDonalds.

 

In my early years I ruined a lot of meat. Some from pure ignorance, some from getting distracted. I started a couple beer can chickens on fire once when people were coming over and ended up the topic the intro of an internationally distributed newsletter.

 

I would recommend getting a quick read thermometer that comes with Meatheads magnet of cooking temperatures. amazingribs is full of grilling/bbq techniques and recipes. I haven't wrecked anything in a long while since following his instructions.

 

If by “go to” you mean quickly replace what we were having for dinner, hit dogs might be the only option. If you mean your “show off recipe” Costco has had prime briskets for as low as $3/lb. you'll need a pellet grill, smoker or pit barrel to really knock one of those out of the park.

 

Come to think of it, pork chops were the last two things I've screwed up. Low and slow is correct. They just can't be rushed.

 

Happy grilling/bbq/Braai-ing!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My "go to" is usually just burgers or brats with corn on the cob and shrimp.  I just helped my brother in law build a huge smoker and we've had some great success with that.  Briskets, ribs, pork butt, pork belly...they all turned out amazing.

 

Honestly for ribs and pork chops I have more success with my Instant Pot than I do on the grill.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used to make my own BBQ sauce. It was Smokey Maple with an Apple base. It was amazing. Forgot my recipe... ribs is where it's at.

 

Smoked wings are my new go to.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You didn't say if you're cooking on gas or charcoal, makes a difference.

 

Overcooked and chewy sounds like thin chops. For a gas grill, get it hot then turn it all the way down.

 

Spray the grill with your favorite non-stick substance and throw on the chops.

 

When you start to see juices coming through, flip'em. On the flip side, when you see clear juices, pull them off.

 

Works for me.

 

Seasoning? Lots of seasoned salt. Most of it will fall off during cooking.

 

 

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

I use a Weber gas grill. The Weber instructions said sear on direct high heat for 6 minutes. Move to indirect heat for another 6 minutes. They were pretty thick, maybe 1 1/4”. Tasted like pork jerky.

 

They looked great coming off the grill. I'll stick to burgers or try low and slow next time.

 

Thanks for the tips.

 

 

Sent from my iPad using MyGolfSpy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just made pork chops on the grill for dinner. Over cooked and chewy, family is still hungry so headed out for ice cream. What is your go to grill recipe.

 

 

Sent from my iPad using MyGolfSpy

Highly recommend a sous vide wand for thick cuts. Cooks to perfection, finish on the bbq or cast iron. Was completely skeptical but the wife bought me one for my birthday a few years ago. An absolute game changer, especially for pork and chicken.

 

39F52208-8055-4C87-9F6A-8945D5336666.jpg

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using MyGolfSpy

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

“Highly recommend a sous vide wand for thick cuts. Cooks to perfection, finish on the bbq or cast iron.”

 

I'm starting to become a believer of sous vide as well. My son-in-law bought one and he's turned out some really good meats. He follows your prescription above.

 

I will say I thought it was a a little ridiculous he had to cook a roast for 2 days, until I tasted it. No more back talking from me!

 

 

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...