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Lots of great info here that I won't regurgitate. Some other things for you to think about.

 

1. Are you a handsy putter? My oldest daughter is, and it makes it difficult to return the face of the putter to the ball with consistent loft. If you cannot return the face to the ball with consistent loft, you will not hit your putts with consistent speed. You can apply the same amount of force to the ball, and your distance will not be consistent. That will drive you to drink.

 

2. What is your automatic one-putt range? It does not matter what it is, just practice putts that a foot longer than that until those become automatic. It may be embarrassing to practice short putts, but it's more embarrassing to miss short putts.

 

Side benefit - hearing the ball go into the hole makes you feel like you're a better putter. Confidence helps.

 

3. What is your automatic two-putt range? Again, it does not matter what it is, just practice putts a foot longer than that until those become automatic two-putts.

 

4. Do not practice putts outside your one-putt range and inside your two-putt range. Anytime I see people doing this, I have to laugh. You're not going to make those putts, and you're not going to three-putt them. Why practice these? Your practice time is limited. Don't waste it.

 

5. Before every putt on the course, tell yourself that you are a good putter. Good putters miss putts. Execute your stroke, and then whatever happens, happens. Let yourself miss putts. Plaid's attitude above is perfect.

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Why do you miss them? Left, right, short, long? Do you start the ball online. Anything consistently or just all over the place? Do you miss during practice as well it just when you are playing?

 

If you are missing that many you have no face control over with the putter. Are you trying to do SBST? Do you follow the putter with your eyes? When you miss do you make adjustments in your next putt?

I mostly miss left. I don't miss by much.... I burn the edges constantly or come up 1/2" short... or lip out. It's right there... the law of averages says that they have to start to drop sooner or later, but so far it isn't happening. I feel like I'm a SBST putter, but I know I have a very slight arc. I use an ER2... and I love it, but I just can't seem to find the bottom of the cup this year. It's very frustrating to be so close and not be able to get in the hole.

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I'm a poor putter- always have been. It's not rocket science is it? I mean wee kids do it easily, mom's do it on putting greens having never payed golf in their life and they do ok.

 

recently got a SAMM putt lab lesson with a TPI coach and OMG it's so obvious when you see it analysed exactly what I have been doing wrong for years! No wonder I can miss the hole from 2 feet!!

 

Practicing now and things look and feel better, so much better.

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I mostly miss left. I don't miss by much.... I burn the edges constantly or come up 1/2" short... or lip out. It's right there... the law of averages says that they have to start to drop sooner or later, but so far it isn't happening. I feel like I'm a SBST putter, but I know I have a very slight arc. I use an ER2... and I love it, but I just can't seem to find the bottom of the cup this year. It's very frustrating to be so close and not be able to get in the hole.

 

My guess without seeing your stroke is that you are trying to watch the putt go in the hole and turning early to watch.  Try keeping your eyes looking at where the ball was even on those 3 footers.  

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My wife got me the "Unconscious Putting" DVD .. really good and highly recommended!

I've been working through the book slowly. My biggest takeaway so far is his comment "hit the putt while the line is still fresh in your mind." That idea has really freed up my stroke because I'm not standing over the ball any longer than necessary.

 

Couple that with a Jack Nicklaus quote I picked up either here or elsewhere. When asked about a crucial putt he missed coming down the stretch of a tournament: "I hit a good putt, it just didn't go in"

 

 

 

Definitely noticing an impact using these two mental approaches. When you lower your expectations, good things happen.

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I've been working through the book slowly. My biggest takeaway so far is his comment "hit the putt while the line is still fresh in your mind." That idea has really freed up my stroke because I'm not standing over the ball any longer than necessary.

 

Couple that with a Jack Nicklaus quote I picked up either here or elsewhere. When asked about a crucial putt he missed coming down the stretch of a tournament: "I hit a good putt, it just didn't go in"

 

 

 

Definitely noticing an impact using these two mental approaches. When you lower your expectations, good things happen.

I lower mine to I expect to 3 putt everything and usually I don't ;)

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My guess without seeing your stroke is that you are trying to watch the putt go in the hole and turning early to watch.  Try keeping your eyes looking at where the ball was even on those 3 footers.  

Loved your list of 12 above; so true for me when I was a poor putter.

 

The quick turn of the head to watch the ball is why I changed my setup and method of putting.  I was around 40 putts per round.  Lots of 3-putts and 2-putts from short distance.  Now I have 29-30 putts per round with most one-putts being up and downs.  Today I had 10 one-putts.  For those that may not remember, I look at the hole when putting.  I did that to stop my head from turning; it is already turned!

 

I will add to all of the great thoughts above by saying that except for the putter and short wedge shots, golf shots involve a big swing and speed.  Now when you get to the green, a golfer is expected to have finesse, short smooth stroke and a different tempo.  Sorry, but that comes with practice.  Some don't need as much time as others.  It was years for me.  It's also fleeting; if I don't play for several days and don't practice, I will not have a round with a bunch of one-putts.  

 

Lots of great info here that I won't regurgitate. Some other things for you to think about.

 

1. Are you a handsy putter? My oldest daughter is, and it makes it difficult to return the face of the putter to the ball with consistent loft. If you cannot return the face to the ball with consistent loft, you will not hit your putts with consistent speed. You can apply the same amount of force to the ball, and your distance will not be consistent. That will drive you to drink.

 

2. What is your automatic one-putt range? It does not matter what it is, just practice putts that a foot longer than that until those become automatic. It may be embarrassing to practice short putts, but it's more embarrassing to miss short putts.

 

Side benefit - hearing the ball go into the hole makes you feel like you're a better putter. Confidence helps.

 

3. What is your automatic two-putt range? Again, it does not matter what it is, just practice putts a foot longer than that until those become automatic two-putts.

 

4. Do not practice putts outside your one-putt range and inside your two-putt range. Anytime I see people doing this, I have to laugh. You're not going to make those putts, and you're not going to three-putt them. Why practice these? Your practice time is limited. Don't waste it.

 

5. Before every putt on the course, tell yourself that you are a good putter. Good putters miss putts. Execute your stroke, and then whatever happens, happens. Let yourself miss putts. Plaid's attitude above is perfect.

 

I agree with all these points with the exception of #4.  While I do not advocate spending precious practice time on these tweener putts, I believe it is imperative to spend time before playing, gauging the speed of the green.  Sure, practice the long putts for lag and the short putts to make, but on the day of play I believe that there is benefit to random putting to holes of varying distance.  Don't putt to the same hole from the same distance all the time.  Putt to different holes or the same hole from different distances and from different directions.  It helps build confidence that you can get it close when out on the course, and a few do fall in!

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I made a post like this a month back. I'm not ashamed to say that I'm an awful putter. Someone said that any good putter could putt with any putter in their hands.

 

Here's the thing. Some people just don't have the delicate touch and eyes to read a green.

 

Some people can't cook worth a lick but they can bake like Betty Crocker.

 

Good ball striker doesn't mean good putter.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using MyGolfSpy

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I will add to all of the great thoughts above by saying that except for the putter and short wedge shots, golf shots involve a big swing and speed.  Now when you get to the green, a golfer is expected to have finesse, short smooth stroke and a different tempo.  Sorry, but that comes with practice.  Some don't need as much time as others.  It was years for me.  It's also fleeting; if I don't play for several days and don't practice, I will not have a round with a bunch of one-putts.  

 

 

I think people have a natural tempo with irons and and with the short game.   Your tempo will be a factor in how long of a stroke you need to make for putts.   My tempo is slower and I putt better with a slow tempo (longer stroke).  My problem with this is that I leave a bunch short.   I can speed up my tempo and get more ball speed, but I lose my distance control.   It does take a lot of practice and generally the short game is the first to go. 

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I think people have a natural tempo with irons and and with the short game. Your tempo will be a factor in how long of a stroke you need to make for putts. My tempo is slower and I putt better with a slow tempo (longer stroke). My problem with this is that I leave a bunch short. I can speed up my tempo and get more ball speed, but I lose my distance control. It does take a lot of practice and generally the short game is the first to go.

Exactly, I putt way betting with a quicker tempo. I play all shots with a really quick tempo. If I slow my tempo I will hit push slices and push all of my putts. If I get too quick I will hit pull hooks and pull all of my putts.

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I think people have a natural tempo with irons and and with the short game.   Your tempo will be a factor in how long of a stroke you need to make for putts.   My tempo is slower and I putt better with a slow tempo (longer stroke).  My problem with this is that I leave a bunch short.   I can speed up my tempo and get more ball speed, but I lose my distance control.   It does take a lot of practice and generally the short game is the first to go. 

I try to not have a long stroke.  Obviously, on long putts I take it back further.  The longer my stroke, the more chance I have of mis-hits; remember, I'm not looking at the ball.  I'm use a short backstroke with acceleration.

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I try to not have a long stroke.  Obviously, on long putts I take it back further.  The longer my stroke, the more chance I have of mis-hits; remember, I'm not looking at the ball.  I'm use a short backstroke with acceleration.

 

And that is what you need based on the choices you have made.   We all make decisions and those decisions influence our stroke.  

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I agree with all these points with the exception of #4.  While I do not advocate spending precious practice time on these tweener putts, I believe it is imperative to spend time before playing, gauging the speed of the green.  Sure, practice the long putts for lag and the short putts to make, but on the day of play I believe that there is benefit to random putting to holes of varying distance.  Don't putt to the same hole from the same distance all the time.  Putt to different holes or the same hole from different distances and from different directions.  It helps build confidence that you can get it close when out on the course, and a few do fall in!

Kenny B - Thanks for clarifying. For #4, I'm talking strictly about practice, not pre-round warm up. You're absolutely right, pre-round, it's all about learning the speed of the greens. If I have enough room, I like to take a bunch of balls and try to lag them up against the edge of the green. I'll pick a spot on the edge about 15 feet away at an angle and lag to it, then pick spots five feet to the left and right (so you get a shorter putt and a longer putt). Then I'll do it again for 25 and 35 feet.

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Over the weekend I think it was I read that the USGA is going to release a rule or perhaps a rule modification concerning the use of Green Reading books/charts/maps. I understand it's imminent. As far as I'm concerned I think that's a good move. I don't think the Pros or anyone else for that matter should be using something like that. Like the USGA feels about this issue I too think green reading with the eye should be "part of the game". Not reading or deciphering a chart/map or diagram. I too think green reading is a part of the skill (or lack of) when playing golf. However.... if you want to use such books or charts/maps when practicing or before a competition; Fine. Otherwise, No.

I saw this earlier.... 

https://www.strackaline.com/#/about

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Heard the same about the green books. Apparently it is basically a fine deal as I read that during an interview with Speith he thought I may have already been enacted. It hasn't but the article took that to mean it it close to being put in place at least for the pro tour.

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Over the weekend I think it was I read that the USGA is going to release a rule or perhaps a rule modification concerning the use of Green Reading books/charts/maps. I understand it's imminent. As far as I'm concerned I think that's a good move. I don't think the Pros or anyone else for that matter should be using something like that. Like the USGA feels about this issue I too think green reading with the eye should be "part of the game". Not reading or deciphering a chart/map or diagram. I too think green reading is a part of the skill (or lack of) when playing golf. However.... if you want to use such books or charts/maps when practicing or before a competition; Fine. Otherwise, No.

I saw this earlier....

https://www.strackaline.com/#/about

Finally, I can't believe it took them so long. Green reading is and integral part of the game. It takes skill, not the skill of being able to read a chart but being able to see breaks.

I wonder how the scores will suffer or if they will at all?

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.

I wonder how the scores will suffer or if they will at all?

About as much as changing the grooves to reduce spin when hitting from the rough

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About as much as changing the grooves to reduce spin when hitting from the rough

I think they might lose a shot or two a round. The pros rely so heavily on the green books. It has been a while since they didn't have a "crutch" to lean on if they are truly baffled by a read. I think the scoring average might go up for a few months and then come back down to where it was before the spike.

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