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For some time, I've been interested in the SuperSpeed Golf training system (some background discussion over here). I've never been a particularly long hitter, so the promise of added speed and distance is appealing. Living in a place with six months of deep winter, having a program of improvement for that half of the year is almost essential.

 

But I found the cost of the aid itself to be an obstacle. It's not that I'm unwilling to pay for a training aid. It's just that the SS sticks themselves seemed to be really easy to make, for a fraction of the cost. And given that SS publishes both 1) the specs of the clubs and 2) the substance of the training regimen, creating a DIY version of the hardware becomes even more appealing.

 

So this thread will document my attempt to make the SuperSpeed clubs, followed by an account of the training and its results.

 

Just this morning, I ordered the first batch of parts from one of my favorite component shops, Diamond Tour Golf. Here are my costs so far:

 

Adams shafts: 3 @ $4.99 = $14.97

Grips (red, blue, and green): 3 @ $1.69 = $5.07

Shipping: $6.89 (prorated; had more in my order than this)

 

Total so far: $26.93

 

I also bought a very cheap (less than $6) digital kitchen scale, but as I'll be using that for more than this project, I'm not going to include that in my costs.

 

I opted for the three different colored grips as a quick way of differentiating the three different weighted clubs. The only slight hitch there: the red and blue are listed at 51 grams each, while the green is 42 grams. I'm not terribly worried about this, as the green stick is supposed to be the lightest. But I might need to pay attention to swing weight as I build these.

 

The shaft is listed at 72 grams.

 

SS lists the following specs for their clubs.

 

Screenshot_2018-07-29-20-37-04.jpeg
 
This means I'll be looking to add between 150 and 200 grams of weight to each club. My initial thought was to do this with washers, but I have a suspicion that it would relatively easy to get this kind of weight with wood.
 
I'm open to suggestions for the weights as I await delivery of the shafts and grips.
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I have seen combinations of washers and golf balls or calibration weights as options on another forum. For pure cost, washers and balls seem to be the best approach. The biggest potential gotcha is making sure the weights are very secure so they don't fly off.

 

Are you going to get a swing radar to keep track of swing speeds? It is recommended but doesn't come with the purchase of the system making I even more cod prohibitive.

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Are you going to get a swing radar to keep track of swing speeds? It is recommended but doesn't come with the purchase of the system making I even more cost prohibitive.

 

I plan to monitor swing speeds with two other devices I already own. The first is an ES12 launch monitor. It's a very rudimentary device, but it does measure ball speeds and guesses at carry distance. If I'm picking up swing speed, it should end up being noticeable in ball speed.

 

The second is a SwingByte 2, which does give a swing speed measurement.

 

The downside of both of these, obviously, is that neither is helpful while doing the actual exercises (the SwingByte doesn't register unless it detects the vibration of impact).

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I plan to monitor swing speeds with two other devices I already own. The first is an ES12 launch monitor. It's a very rudimentary device, but it does measure ball speeds and guesses at carry distance. If I'm picking up swing speed, it should end up being noticeable in ball speed.

 

The second is a SwingByte 2, which does give a swing speed measurement.

 

The downside of both of these, obviously, is that neither is helpful while doing the actual exercises (the SwingByte doesn't register unless it detects the vibration of impact).

Not sure about Swingbyte but I do remember the instructions on the ES-14 stating you actually have to hit a ball for the unit to record. 

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I plan to monitor swing speeds with two other devices I already own. The first is an ES12 launch monitor. It's a very rudimentary device, but it does measure ball speeds and guesses at carry distance. If I'm picking up swing speed, it should end up being noticeable in ball speed.

 

The second is a SwingByte 2, which does give a swing speed measurement.

 

The downside of both of these, obviously, is that neither is helpful while doing the actual exercises (the SwingByte doesn't register unless it detects the vibration of impact).

IMHO it doesn't really matter how fast you swing during the exercises. It only matters if it translates to club and ball speeds. If it doesn't translate to club and ball speed, it doesn't matter how fast you swing the trainer.
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IMHO it doesn't really matter how fast you swing during the exercises. It only matters if it translates to club and ball speeds. If it doesn't translate to club and ball speed, it doesn't matter how fast you swing the trainer.

I mostly agree, but here's my pushback: when going for speed, it's easy to confuse effort for speed. Straining and grunting doesn't always translate into an an efficient use of mechanics. And that's where the swing speed radar comes in handy during the training swings: you can associate mechanics with results immediately, rather than waiting until you finish and transition into hitting balls.
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Got my first parts. I weighed them this morning, and was pleased to find that (according to my very cheap digital kitchen scale) all three shafts came in at 70 grams.

 

20180804_080751.jpeg

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So I stumbled into the Golf Stick Pro last night. Looks to be like SuperSpeed but in one "club" instead of 3 by utilizing counterweights on both ends. Very intriguing for $80 less

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I have a golf buddy that many years ago simply took a nice smooth steel rod of about/roughly 1/2" diameter, put some grips on the ends and walahh. Speed stick! Couldn't tell you if it helped any. I still hit the ball further than him without a speed stick clone.  

But that's not saying much. LOL

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I made my own set a couple years ago and it definitely helped my swing speed.  I made a big jump in speed and then plateaued.  It was totally work the money and effort.  Highly recommend one of the SSR radar units.  One of the parts of the training is getting an understanding of what feels fast and what is actually fast.  Early on there were swings I felt were extremely fast but the radar showed differently.  

 

Haven't been able to push thru the plateau but have been working on technical aspects of my swing that might help.  

 

Overall I think I picked up between 15 and 20 yards on my drives.  

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I'm a week into the program. Don't have a radar, but plan on hitting a launch monitor monthly to gauge any speed gains. There are a bunch of great reviews on YouTube tracking progress over months. The system seems to work well. Good luck.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using MyGolfSpy

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I'm making progress on this project. After taking measurements of the inner and outer shaft diameters, I went to Tractor Supply this past weekend and picked up these:

 

20180814_124628.jpg

 

The bolt is just under 4mm in diameter, which is what I needed. The washer is called a "fender washer" (as one who is admittedly mechanically incompetent, I was guided to this by a woman from our church who works at the hardware store).

 

I then bought a big bag of washers that would fit around the shaft, roughly 8mm in diameter. The idea, obviously, is to epoxy the bolt and the big washer onto the shaft, and then secure the other washers (at the proper weight) to that.

 

So far, I've begun the light one, which takes 17 washers to get to the proper weight. I have epoxied in the bolt and large washer. Tonight, I'll probably epoxy each of the remaining washers in place. So far, it looks like this:

 

20180814_124544.jpg

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I'm making progress on this project. After taking measurements of the inner and outer shaft diameters, I went to Tractor Supply this past weekend and picked up these:

 

attachicon.gif 20180814_124628.jpg

 

The bolt is just under 4mm in diameter, which is what I needed. The washer is called a "fender washer" (as one who is admittedly mechanically incompetent, I was guided to this by a woman from our church who works at the hardware store).

 

I then bought a big bag of washers that would fit around the shaft, roughly 8mm in diameter. The idea, obviously, is to epoxy the bolt and the big washer onto the shaft, and then secure the other washers (at the proper weight) to that.

 

So far, I've begun the light one, which takes 17 washers to get to the proper weight. I have epoxied in the bolt and large washer. Tonight, I'll probably epoxy each of the remaining washers in place. So far, it looks like this:

 

attachicon.gif 20180814_124544.jpg

How did you decide the number of washers to use.

 

 

Sent from my iPad using MyGolfSpy

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How did you decide the number of washers to use.

 

 

Sent from my iPad using MyGolfSpy

 

I used a kitchen scale. SuperSpeed lists the specs for their clubs. I know the weight of the shaft and grips. And so I'm weighing everything else to get it close, leaving room for epoxy, grip tape, etc.

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I'd like everyone's feedback and ideas about how to complete this project.

 

I ordered three driver shafts, three grips, and three adapter tips. The shafts were very cheap but good quality. They are Mitsubishi Rayon Bassara 45 x 5ct. Ladies flex. I think having the lightest shaft made the most sense and that adding weight is the easy part. The grips were cheap chamois brand. These came from rock bottom golf for $28.37. The ping adapter tips are on their way from China at $13.08. Grand total of $41.45 so far.

 

The concept of super speed training is that you exercise your driver swing motion with headless driver clubs that are 20% and 10% lighter then a standard driver and 5% heavier then a standard driver. I'm not concerned about the developers idea of absolute weight. I was only concerned about my drivers weight, tipping the scales at 322g. I have a good scale that's made for portability and is lab grade.

 

Consider this weight of my standard Ping G to a Wilson D300 which is 271g. This difference is huge. So for the standard weight SuperSpeed gives us my question immediately was ‘Compared to what?'. Total driver weight or driver head weight?

 

I think I'm truly going to max out my personal driver swing speed with this customizable training system given any driver I chose to game. My plan is to use as many washers needed with the screw that inserts into the driver tip. The first washer opening needs to be small and the rest just need to fit around the tip. Anyone have any ideas about the best way to add the needed weight? My initial thoughts are to target total weight and not isolate head weight.

 

I'll give more details about my trainer weights when they are all glued together. Right now based on raw data I need at least 193g for the lightest one and 241g on the heavier one. Keep in mind this does not include glue, tip and screw. The shaft weights were very consistent at 47g. One weighed 46g. Grips were 51g but the ends need to be cut off in order to fit the shaft.

 

Any feedback would be great. Good bad or ugly.

 

IMG_2062.JPG

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Nice! I tired to search for a topic on this but this one didn't show up.

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Hey Pat I'm attempting the same thing! I'm not using the SuperSpeed specs though, and I have a really accurate scale. I'm basing my build on my total Ping G driver weight. I'm also using real driver head adapters so that I can actually use or sell these. Here's my post if you want to take a look and comment.

 

https://forum.mygolfspy.com/topic/25721-diy-super-speed-training-system/

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