Jump to content
g-off

electronic scoring and pace of play

Recommended Posts

It's acually a software program that the MGA pays for. It sure of the cost, it allows us to sign up directly into a group and time. And then on Golf day, someone in the group posts the scores for all 4 in the group. It's preett cool. It's called

 

Tm.golfsoftware.net

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used to occasionally play as a fourth with Peter, Mike, and Pio--three guys with whom I used to work, all now retired. (Actually, Mike has now left us.)

 

They never kept score...ever.  It was strictly about fresh air, a little bit of exercise, and socializing with them.  They were even less accomplished players than I, for the most part, but they really enjoyed that occasional great shot. Who doesn't?

 

They didn't even keep score at the bar, afterward.

 

I could really enjoy that way of playing once in a while.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As someone who uses a phone app, I simply find it easier. It's one or two screen touches while people are teeing off on the next hole. To each their own, this works for me.

 

Pace of play will always be an issue, and people playing slowly will find new and creative ways to dilly dally. I don't think it's a specific action, but their mindset and lack of awareness or caring. If it's not their phone app for shot stats it's filming every shot, or texting friends instead of hitting, or looking for extra lost balls, or a three course meal of breakfast balls... etc.

 

What I did say is that if you wish to improve your game, you need to be making the correct choices before you make a shot, not historically looking a stat after you've made a shot. No stat ever made a good shot happen - period.

You certainly don't need stats analysis to realise "I really shouldn't be slicing my tee shots into the trees" or "I really need to hole more putts". That's obvious data that is total junk if you need a review of a scorecard to remind you of it. "57% of my 150+ yard  shots reach the green" is the kind of stat that if you really need to know it, then you must be pretty dumb.

By the same token, I can recall just about every shot from memory of a particular round without the need of a device or a scorecard. The scorecard itself is just a means of totting the score up afterwards. Do I need to write down the fairways hit or number of sand saves, greens in regulation or putts? No, because I remember those shots because historically, I HIT THEM!! 

 

 

There isn't a sport in the world where people don't review their previous performances for areas/how to improve. You say you remember all your shots so you don't need to record them - super, that's your system and you can self review on the fly. I'm jealous you can remember all that, I certainly can't. Using stats on the app I get access to information I'd otherwise forget and can keep it fresh heading into the my pre-shot choices. Maybe I'm just feeding into my own need to have numbers and data to confirm just about everything, I don't see why that should bother anyone else.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe I'm just feeding into my own need to have numbers and data to confirm just about everything, I don't see why that should bother anyone else.

No, it's not.  For me, I live for numbers, so the more the merrier.  It's one of the reasons why when the USGA changed the posting for handicap purposes from any round to having to have someone else play with you that I now go out of my way to look for someone to play a round of golf with.  Maybe I am the only one who looks at golf this way, but I like the fact that every round I play gets posted to handicap and that I have something to look at going forward and to be able to see some of my older scores and compare them to where I am now.

 

It's not just about my round or score either, as I'll sit and watch Golf Channel for several hours while they recap scores of the day, and then they give statistic after statistic, and records, and other numbers in comparison to history, and I just absolutely absorb it all.  Most people that I know couldn't give two farts about who did what when, and everyone has a different motivation for doing what they do, but for me golf is more about the numbers than anything else.

 

What can I say.  I work on a computer all day long using spreadsheets with endless numbers, and I am the defacto statistician and record keeper for my Tuesday golf league.  I track the points and scores for everyone in the league, and post records, averages and all sorts of other numbers for people to look over.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just keep score in my head. I know what par is for each 9 and just add/subtract as I go. I already know what I shot before my partner adds it up. But, I'm not a stat geek, so all the numbers don't interest me at all.  :)

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I will simply add to this topic by sharing my experience with an FSGA Fourball tournament this past weekend.  36 holes over two days for this event as a reference point.  Tee times on Saturday, split tee foursomes - two, two-man teams per foursome on each hole and tee time.  All golfers involved were either single digit or scratch or better, so you are dealing with (in some cases) "professional" amateurs who play in these type of events all the time.  For reference purposes, this was my first time trying an event like this, and with a current 6.2 index, me and my buddy brought up the rear, finishing T40 in a 42 team field.

 

The title of this topic absolutely applies to this event, because the FSGA (Florida State Golf Association) uses the Golf Genius app, and asks that one member of each foursome use the app to record scores as you play.  For the sake of this post, I will say that I was responsible for posting the scores for our foursome on both days, as I have my iphone handy just for the purposes of this app in this tournament, and otherwise I leave my iphone on silent in my golf bag and never touched during the round.  The Golf Genius app is extremely easy to install, setup and use.  The FSGA gave us a unique code for our foursome, and you punch in the code, and the app pops up with your group.  You select your name, and it shows the first hole, and asks you to simply post a score for each player for that hole.  My standard method was to pull the app out while we were finishing putting on the green, and as soon as each player finished out I would post the score to the app and save it once all four scores are posted.  If I was last to putt, I would pull the app out after I finished, and post the scores while walking to the cart.  This method neither slowed us down, nor hindered our foursome from maintaining pace of play in this tournament.  Also, by each group having their scores posted during the round you are able to look at the leaderboard and see where you stand during the round as it compares to the field.  Very convenient for the competitors that want to know where they stand.

 

As for pace of play, the FSGA had signs on every hole, and marshalls always monitoring each group to determine our pace of play.  At the turn there was a marshall with a watch and a clip board, and each group's time was written down as they completed the 9th hole.  Their policy was pretty simple.  There would be no warnings during the round, and if you were behind the expected pace of play, the offending slow group would be assessed a 1 stroke penalty.  And if you were the group behind the slow group, and you were within 10 minutes of the slow group in front of you, you were fine with pace of play.

 

I saw this policy work fabulously on Saturday, as we were the 2nd group off of #1, and had to wait a bit on almost every shot on the front nine for the group in front of us, who were first off.  But I don't know what was said on #9 green by the FSGA to this group, but by the time we got to 10 tee the group in front of us was gone, and already putting out on #10, and we never saw them the rest of the day.  We finished our round in 4 hours and 11 minutes.  Sunday was a shotgun start, and we were never delayed the entire round, and finished in 4 hours and 7 minutes.

 

So to all the naysayers that say there is nothing you can do about pace of play, I would strongly disagree, as the FSGA has a great system in place for their tournaments, and it absolutely does work.  And being new to this I really had no clue how it works, but the veterans that we played with were all very aware of their pace of play throughout the round, because apparently the FSGA doesn't hesitate to issue penalty strokes in their events.

 

What a great system they have in place, and what a great tournament to take part in.  It's great knowing that when you tee off at 8:00 am, that you will be done just after noon, and that you don't have to guess on how long it will take to complete a round of golf.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

anyone else play with people/courses that have a cell phone app for scoring and find it just takes a little too long between holes as they play with the phone?  I guess I may be too old school and realize that a pencil can still do the same job without slowing things down.  Curious if anyone else has thoughts on this?

 

rant over

 

Embrace the people who are delaying the game because they are using an app that will hopefully help them play better in the future, BECAUSE these people are going to take too long to do everything.

 

These apps are designed with ease of use and quickness in mind. Early on they may have been cumbersome and time consuming but not now.

 

If it were not the scorecard, it would be the club selection, or the distance to the hole or taking a meteorological report or something else that will waste time. Hopefully, they will study those stats and reduce their score and eventually save one stroke that will ultimately reduce the number of times they can dicker around and waste time next round.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It takes me 10 seconds to record my score, putts, FIR, and penalties in the app that I use. I do it with my bag slung over my shoulder on the way to the next hole.

 

Someone who's inconsiderate and inputting their score while standing on the green would be doing the same if they had a scorecard in their pocket.

 

It's not the tech, it's the person.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using MyGolfSpy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It takes me 10 seconds to record my score, putts, FIR, and penalties in the app that I use. I do it with my bag slung over my shoulder on the way to the next hole.

 

Someone who's inconsiderate and inputting their score while standing on the green would be doing the same if they had a scorecard in their pocket.

 

It's not the tech, it's the person.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using MyGolfSpy

I use a scoring and gambling/bets app called Strokes. (Android only) I can enter scores in about 2 seconds after a hole. Strokes isn't an app for keeping stats or being "social". It's not a GPS app either. It's only for keeping score and the associated bets you've setup for the round. Before you start your round you select the players, select a bet or bets.... and keep score. After the round a push of a button and bets are resolved. Easy peasy. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As a technophobic luddite, I never used any of that stuff other than GPS towards the end.

Concern over slow play had nothing to do it.

The Dukes were never in a hurry.  I'm sure that the remaining ones are still not.

 

It just seems like work, and I would have never required having that much data on myself.

It's not like my game was going to start getting better. The trend in the opposite direction was well established.

CyberMetrics can't, unfortunately, reverse physiology

 

But from the perspective of being younger and having aspirations to improve, how does the data help?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I dont worry about pace of play, I just keep up with the group in front of me. It's that simple. Recording scores in an app is easy and takes little time to do. We use it every Saturday in our group and it doesn't hurt pace of play. People who don't care how long it takes them to play golf are the problem as far a space of play, it's people, nothing else.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I will simply add to this topic by sharing my experience with an FSGA Fourball tournament this past weekend.  36 holes over two days for this event as a reference point.  Tee times on Saturday, split tee foursomes - two, two-man teams per foursome on each hole and tee time.  All golfers involved were either single digit or scratch or better, so you are dealing with (in some cases) "professional" amateurs who play in these type of events all the time.  For reference purposes, this was my first time trying an event like this, and with a current 6.2 index, me and my buddy brought up the rear, finishing T40 in a 42 team field.

 

The title of this topic absolutely applies to this event, because the FSGA (Florida State Golf Association) uses the Golf Genius app, and asks that one member of each foursome use the app to record scores as you play.  For the sake of this post, I will say that I was responsible for posting the scores for our foursome on both days, as I have my iphone handy just for the purposes of this app in this tournament, and otherwise I leave my iphone on silent in my golf bag and never touched during the round.  The Golf Genius app is extremely easy to install, setup and use.  The FSGA gave us a unique code for our foursome, and you punch in the code, and the app pops up with your group.  You select your name, and it shows the first hole, and asks you to simply post a score for each player for that hole.  My standard method was to pull the app out while we were finishing putting on the green, and as soon as each player finished out I would post the score to the app and save it once all four scores are posted.  If I was last to putt, I would pull the app out after I finished, and post the scores while walking to the cart.  This method neither slowed us down, nor hindered our foursome from maintaining pace of play in this tournament.  Also, by each group having their scores posted during the round you are able to look at the leaderboard and see where you stand during the round as it compares to the field.  Very convenient for the competitors that want to know where they stand.

 

As for pace of play, the FSGA had signs on every hole, and marshalls always monitoring each group to determine our pace of play.  At the turn there was a marshall with a watch and a clip board, and each group's time was written down as they completed the 9th hole.  Their policy was pretty simple.  There would be no warnings during the round, and if you were behind the expected pace of play, the offending slow group would be assessed a 1 stroke penalty.  And if you were the group behind the slow group, and you were within 10 minutes of the slow group in front of you, you were fine with pace of play.

 

I saw this policy work fabulously on Saturday, as we were the 2nd group off of #1, and had to wait a bit on almost every shot on the front nine for the group in front of us, who were first off.  But I don't know what was said on #9 green by the FSGA to this group, but by the time we got to 10 tee the group in front of us was gone, and already putting out on #10, and we never saw them the rest of the day.  We finished our round in 4 hours and 11 minutes.  Sunday was a shotgun start, and we were never delayed the entire round, and finished in 4 hours and 7 minutes.

 

So to all the naysayers that say there is nothing you can do about pace of play, I would strongly disagree, as the FSGA has a great system in place for their tournaments, and it absolutely does work.  And being new to this I really had no clue how it works, but the veterans that we played with were all very aware of their pace of play throughout the round, because apparently the FSGA doesn't hesitate to issue penalty strokes in their events.

 

What a great system they have in place, and what a great tournament to take part in.  It's great knowing that when you tee off at 8:00 am, that you will be done just after noon, and that you don't have to guess on how long it will take to complete a round of golf.

My association, the NCGA, has a very similar policy although the player do not enter scores on the app. Scorecards are kept and the officials enter after signatures are complete. 

 

You have a set time from the time you tee off until you finish, the time for each completed hole is printed on the scorecard. The officials let you know throughout the round where you stand, but if you finish behind your time after 18 (they measure the time when the flag goes back into the hole) or you finish 14 minutes behind the group in front of you it is a 2 stroke penalty to the entire group no questions asked. Now I have seen an instance where a penalty was issued and I don't believe it was warranted. And also a time where the complete time was almost unfair, but in general it works very well and you know almost exactly how long your round will be. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...