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Club fitting worth it for high handicappers?


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Just wanted to throw this out there as I am curious the cost/benefit of getting fitted for clubs vs just working with a stock set as a higher handicapper(20).

 

Also, does getting fitted benefit your game that much as a higher handicapper or would the money be better used for lessons?

 

 

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Driver: 2016 TaylorMade M2, 9.5*,


Irons: 2017 Taylormade M2 4-PW,


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Putter: Odyssey White Hot putter


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Absolutely yes.

 

Results might not he as drastic,but here are some great videos of a high handicap golfer being fitted

 

https://youtu.be/37eeDv5lmlE

 

https://youtu.be/jcUwb5-wviw

 

And if you don't have the money for a full fitting, at least get an understanding of your driver swing (speed, angle of attack) and spend the $7 for an online fitting at Truegolffit

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The stick setup may not fit your swing. Getting fit will put clubs in your hands that will work with you and your swing instead of trying to find a swing that makes the club work. A fitting is about reducing the shot dispersion and improving ball flight characteristics.

Driver: Titleist 917D3 9.5 with Graphite Design MAD Pro 65g S

Wood: Titleist 917F2 with UST Mamiya Helium 5F4

Hybrid: Titleist 816H1 21 with Atmos Blue 85 S

Irons: Titleist 718 AP3 4i, 718 CB 5-6, MB 7-9 with KBS $ Taper 125

Wedges: Vokey SM7 46/50/54/60 with DG s200

Putter: Scotty Caemeron Super Rat1

Ball: Titleist Prov1

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Both?

When you think about it, regardless of your ability your clubs should "fit" your physical dimensions, your stance, your strength and ultimately the way you swing. That element doesn't change so much.

Lessons are a means of learning an effective and efficient way to deliver the club to the ball as well as learning how and when to play certain shots. 

BOTH elements of fitting and lessons share one common goal - to enable you to be hitting the ball better every time. The fitted clubs simply increase the chances of finding the centre of the clubface, regardless of your ability. Lessons increase your ability. So it's a self perpetuating win-win situation. 

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Absolutely yes.

 

Results might not he as drastic,but here are some great videos of a high handicap golfer being fitted

 

 

 

And if you don't have the money for a full fitting, at least get an understanding of your driver swing (speed, angle of attack) and spend the $7 for an online fitting at Truegolffit

Beat me to the exact same reply. 

 

But I'll also add this one  :D

 

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Just wanted to throw this out there as I am curious the cost/benefit of getting fitted for clubs vs just working with a stock set as a higher handicapper(20).

 

Also, does getting fitted benefit your game that much as a higher handicapper or would the money be better used for lessons?

 

 

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Yes, I'm a 23 and have done a few fittings. Sometimes to find new clubs that work better others just to make sure I'm in the right specs so I can focus more on improving my game and not wondering if this club is holding me back or something.

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FW:   :cobra-small: F6 baffler set at 16º

Hybrid:  NONE
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Wedges:   :nike-small: 52º :nike-small: 56º  :edel-golf-1: 60 º w/ KBS C-Taper XS Soft-stepped

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GET FIT! If you don't, you will alter your swing to fit the clubs not getting clubs that fit your swing. It is a simple as this, fit clubs will ALWAYS perform better than off the rack. Lessons would be a great next step after a fitting.

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Wilson Staff C300 9.0* Fujikura Pro 58 stiff

Callaway Rogue 3W Mitsubishi Diamana D+ LTD 80 stiff

Mizuno MP-18 MMC FLI-HI 2 iron UST Mamiya Recoil 95 stiff

Ping I200's 4-W Aerotech Steelfiber I110 CW stiff

Ping Glide 52* and 58* stiff

Bettinardi Studio Stock #38 Armlock

 

 

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Both?

When you think about it, regardless of your ability your clubs should "fit" your physical dimensions, your stance, your strength and ultimately the way you swing. That element doesn't change so much.

Lessons are a means of learning an effective and efficient way to deliver the club to the ball as well as learning how and when to play certain shots.

BOTH elements of fitting and lessons share one common goal - to enable you to be hitting the ball better every time. The fitted clubs simply increase the chances of finding the centre of the clubface, regardless of your ability. Lessons increase your ability. So it's a self perpetuating win-win situation.

It really is this answer. If you are misfit for clubs you can develop a lifetime of bad habits.

 

 

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i can only speak as a guy that just got fit for a driver only...i've played more golf than i ever have this year and rewarded myself for finally breaking 90 by getting a fit for a new driver.

 

1. i'm basically an off the rack standard size guy, 6ft and 180

2. i had no idea what my swing speed was and my last driver was an off the rack 12* tm aeroburner with a "regular" shaft

3. where i went the guy tested the actual stiffness of my shaft and his findings were that it was actually stiff and not regular.

4. then i got in the bay and started hitting.  first he found my swing speed, which was between 95-100

5. from there he got me trying different heads.  all the new stuff.  the pings, the 2 taylor made ones, the rogue, and i think one other.

6. the main thing was finding the combo which got the tightest dispersion which is really what i wanted.  i can regularly hit the ball 250, and sometimes a lot further, with the 12* i had.

7. from there he tried to max my distance with a few other shafts but we decided on what seemed to give me more forgiveness/what was in or closest to the fairway.

 

i ended up with a callaway rogue 9* with an off the rack shaft option which was the same sort of performance of some fancy one that was like 200 bucks or whatever.

 

the main thing, for me, was knowing i was fitted for something that really did match my swing and i saw working.

 

now that it's taken care of in that way, i can't blame the club can i? haha.  really though that's the best thing i got out of it.

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The entire launch monitor fitting might be premature at the beginner level, I would guess, but lie angles at the very least should be checked.

 

At least with irons and wedges.

 

Most modern metalwoods can't be bent, unfortunately, and with woods, there's a face angle issue as well.

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Joined MGS back in march and as I read more , most everyone on here recommended getting fit, knowing I was in the market for new irons and possibly driver, I went and got fit and it was the best thing I could have done for my game.  I am a high handicapper as well but improving.

 

From being fit I would have never known I needed a more upright lie angle (ping green dot) I did not think much about the grips but I actually needed a bigger grip size, the shafts I got the best for my swing speed ( no idea prior as to what my avg speed was) . As a bonus the fitter being a teaching pro also adjusted my grip after observing I had a tendency to go left , was an awkward adjustment but after practice it has been a difference maker.

 

 I took the lessons pre new clubs and have been able to incorporate both into my improved game. Setup, address, weight transition, swing tempo ( big one for me I was swinging for the fences on every drive) 

 

The two combined have helped my game tremendously.

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DRIVER -  Sim Max 10.5 lowered to 9.75 Ventus Red 5 S  shaft 

Woods -  Taylormade Sim Ti 3wood - Diamana reg 65

                Taylormade  5 wood-  Ventus 6r 

Rescue/Hybrid -  

IRONS -  Callaway Mavrik 6- PW, AW   KBS 80 R steel 

WEDGES-  Vokey SM 8   50/54/58 

PUTTER-  Odyssey Stroke Lab Bird of Prey. 

BALL-  Pro V1x or Tp5X  -- trying to figure this one out.

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Joined MGS back in march and as I read more , most everyone on here recommended getting fit, knowing I was in the market for new irons and possibly driver, I went and got fit and it was the best thing I could have done for my game. I am a high handicapper as well but improving.

 

From being fit I would have never known I needed a more upright lie angle (ping green dot) I did not think much about the grips but I actually needed a bigger grip size, the shafts I got the best for my swing speed ( no idea prior as to what my avg speed was) . As a bonus the fitter being a teaching pro also adjusted my grip after observing I had a tendency to go left , was an awkward adjustment but after practice it has been a difference maker.

 

I took the lessons pre new clubs and have been able to incorporate both into my improved game. Setup, address, weight transition, swing tempo ( big one for me I was swinging for the fences on every drive)

 

The two combined have helped my game tremendously.

Thats awesome stuff. A real testament to the quality fitting you got. Just like me in the TXG video of my fitting. Ian actually took about 30 minutes to address two swing faults. Not judt try and cram a club down my throat.

 

 

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:ping-small: G410 Hybrid 26 degree Alta CB R Flex

:titelist-small: T100S/T200 Combo 5-7 T100S 8-P T200 TT Black Oynx R Flex

:titelist-small: SM7 54.08 F 58.12 K 

:scotty-small:  Phantom 5.5   35" 

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If I had to choose between the two options, club fitting or lessons, I'd choose lessons all day long.  I'm not a big believer that getting fitted is a big benefit for most high handicappers.  If you can figure out your driver swing speed and work back from there to get an idea of your shaft stiffness, I'd say just buy a good quality set of game improvement clubs and spend your money on lessons and at the driving range putting those lessons into practice. This is especially true if you are a "standard size" fella, say 5'8-6' tall, which covers the majority of us.  Of course if you are 5'2 or 6'6" off the rack might be radically unsuited to you.  In my experience most high handicappers suffer from two basic shortcomings.  They don't practice enough or at all, and they don't work on their swing via lessons or self taught.  They just show up to the course and swing away and generally, just hitting balls is a chore and forget about warming up with more than a few chips and a half dozen putts. 

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I'm kinda on the fence with a full blown fitting for a beginner.

I think one can go to one of the big golf centers and spend a little while in the booth with a salesman and swing a bunch of different clubs.

 

I think it's good to have an idea of what you want to learn tho, with the main emphasis on swing speed to get a general idea of shaft flex.

 

But no matter how well a club is fitted, if the dude has a fatal swing flaw, only lessons can help that.

 

But, I guess the question should be,

Do you already have decent clubs, or are you thinking of buying some new ones?

If you're dumping a lot of coin on new stix then by all means, get them fitted.

 

But mostly, it depends...

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Something to consider in regards to when to get fitted....... what are your measurements? Do you fall between the 5 10 to 6 foot range? Do you have big Michael Jordan hands? Or the wing span of LeBron James? My point here is if you are an average dude then work on posture, technique and tempo first. If you fall outside of the normal measurement range then getting fitted upfront will pay huge dividends as you develop.

 

Caveat- if you have physical limitations (other than lack of talent) and or a disability then you to are a strong candidate for an early fitting.

 

 

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If I had to choose between the two options, club fitting or lessons, I'd choose lessons all day long. I'm not a big believer that getting fitted is a big benefit for most high handicappers. If you can figure out your driver swing speed and work back from there to get an idea of your shaft stiffness, I'd say just buy a good quality set of game improvement clubs and spend your money on lessons and at the driving range putting those lessons into practice. This is especially true if you are a "standard size" fella, say 5'8-6' tall, which covers the majority of us. Of course if you are 5'2 or 6'6" off the rack might be radically unsuited to you. In my experience most high handicappers suffer from two basic shortcomings. They don't practice enough or at all, and they don't work on their swing via lessons or self taught. They just show up to the course and swing away and generally, just hitting balls is a chore and forget about warming up with more than a few chips and a half dozen putts.

I agree, I'd also add buy used clubs (+ add new grips) and spend the difference on lessons and range balls. A couple of years from now as one gets better then a fitting an new clubs might be in order.

 

 

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I'm in the "both" camp- if you're brand new to the game, take a lesson or two, and get a basic fitting to get you close- at least get the clubs you have (assuming they're in the ballpark of what you should be swinging) dialed in to your specs, or get your specs so you know what to look for while shopping. However, lessons, or even a basic thirty minute session or two will do a ton to get you headed the right way. Take it from there.

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Something to consider in regards to when to get fitted....... what are your measurements? Do you fall between the 5 10 to 6 foot range? Do you have big Michael Jordan hands? Or the wing span of LeBron James? My point here is if you are an average dude then work on posture, technique and tempo first. If you fall outside of the normal measurement range then getting fitted upfront will pay huge dividends as you develop.

 

Caveat- if you have physical limitations (other than lack of talent) and or a disability then you to are a strong candidate for an early fitting.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using MyGolfSpy

If you're 5'10" with LeBron's 7 foot wingspan you're probably too busy working in the circus to have time for golf :D

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I agree, I'd also add buy used clubs (+ add new grips) and spend the difference on lessons and range balls. A couple of years from now as one gets better then a fitting an new clubs might be in order.

 

 

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Fully agree with Tony here. Because golf requires trying out clubs before pulling the trigger on them you can always go into any golf galaxy or PGA superstore and try out the clubs they have to see what works for you, especially with their used clubs. You can learn a lot about what you like from hitting a few used drivers or irons with different shafts/lofts/head shapes and decide whats right for you based on what the monitor says. And because golfers love to buy equipment more than maybe anyone but motorheads there is a plethora of used equipment on ebay at great prices which lets you focus your funds on getting better.

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Driver: Callaway Rogue - Project X HZRDUS Yellow, 6.0, 63g

Fairway: Callaway Epic 3 wood, Rogue MAX stiff, 75g

4-6 Iron: Mizuno JPX-850 - Project X 5.5 

7-PW: Mizuno JPX-850 Forged - Project X 5.5

Wedges: Mizuno MP-T5 (50, 54), Ping Glide 2.0 Stealth 60 ES

Putter: Odyssey Marxman, Currently tested and kept Golf Pride Tour SNSR Contour Pro 140cc grip

 

 

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