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chemclub

New rules of golf

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I'm a little surprised by the double contact rule. Don't quite understand why that should be allowed.

 

I don't have any issue with leaving the flagstick in during putting. Seems to make sense and would speed up play.

 

You can now ground your club and take practice swings in a hazard (not a bunker) should rile a few feathers.

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Everyone on here and WRX knows I am one of the biggest detractors of the USGA around. For ONCE it seems like they have some sense. Most of the "new rules" frankly is how the average Joe golfer plays it anyhow. Loved their little "tongue in cheek" statement on club lengths basically saying the longest club in the bag other than the putter to be used to measure. I think they are trying to address the slow play issue but I do not see where it will help because like I previously stated most average golfers play that way anyhow. The way the new rules are written as such gives local clubs and committees more latitude on local rules which they did anyhow. A lot of that was for them to save face with local clubs. One example was here several clubs here adopted a "local rule" to disregard the anchored putter ban in league play. Down here especially in tourist golf season a lot of courses marked OBs and some hazards as laterals to speed up play. They also moved drop areas to the green side of a hazard to speed up play. On the Professional side of things POP may determine whether the various tours adopt the new rules--- Maybe there is a light at the end of the tunnel and the USGA is seeing the light after so many screw ups

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Finally some rule changes that make sense. These seem to be common sense and the way most people play anyway. I know one of there main concerns was pace of play but if most Weekend warriors play this way anyway, it probably won't help much.

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The maximum score rule makes sense - we already do it in informal play. What I'm interested in is at the end of the video they further defined it as double bogey and then said it could be 6, 8 or 10. I assume this refers to Equitable Stroke Control where you take the maximum allowable strokes for your handicap or is this (ESC) going away.

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These Rules changes were announced well over a year ago.  The USGA solicited reactions and suggestions based on the initial proposed changes, and a number of the "new" rules were revised, apparently in light of the public feedback.  Preliminary "near-final" information was released this spring, and the final versions of these rules were made available this week.  

The "local rule" for lost or OB balls is interesting.  If you know that your ball might be lost or OB, and hit a provisional, you're not allowed to use the "local rule".  I can envision a number of arguments over where the ball is likely to be lost, or where it went OB, as that point will determine where the relief is.

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The maximum score rule makes sense - we already do it in informal play. What I'm interested in is at the end of the video they further defined it as double bogey and then said it could be 6, 8 or 10. I assume this refers to Equitable Stroke Control where you take the maximum allowable strokes for your handicap or is this (ESC) going away.

The recognition of a competition format with a maximum score establishes something we've had all along with Stableford competitions, its just scored a little differently.  However, it has nothing at all to do with ESC, handicap rules are  pretty much separate from rules of playing golf.  The Committee for the competition can establish any maximum score they choose, as far as I know.

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Well, the entire Korean contingent of the LPGA will have to quit playing, since they can no longer have their caddies lining them up on every stroke.  How will they manage to play the game now?

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Well, the entire Korean contingent of the LPGA will have to quit playing, since they can no longer have their caddies lining them up on every stroke.  How will they manage to play the game now?

This rule change will likely slow an already snails pace LPGA round.  I can see players get over the ball, and then back off because they won't trust their line... on every shot!

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Golf really needs an alternate sanctioning body competing with the USGA for club affiliations.

.

Rugby has two completely different sets of rules, the proponents of which having an amusing disdain for one another.

 

Since being polarized is so in fashion today, why not have golf join in the fun?

 

It seems to be needing a jump start anyway as the growth period is obviously ended.

 

Of course, it's easy for me, in my miserable situation, to be full of suggestions.

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Golf really needs an alternate sanctioning body competing with the USGA for club affiliations.

If you believe some of the quotes from PGA tour members about these revisions to the rules, you'd think the PGA Tour might consider writing their own rules.  I've been chuckling at that for about 18 months now.  As much as I respect the playing ability of these guys, for many of them the first rule of golf they read will be the one they write.  And if the few knowledgeable players do come up with some workable rules, you know the remainder will be complaining just as much as they do now.

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A lot of simplified rules in here that were needed even if they don't help speed up the game. The rules have been to confusing to find and interpret in many cases. I do find the double hit interesting as I thought you would at least have to count each strike but that isn't how I read it.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using MyGolfSpy

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If you believe some of the quotes from PGA tour members about these revisions to the rules, you'd think the PGA Tour might consider writing their own rules. I've been chuckling at that for about 18 months now. As much as I respect the playing ability of these guys, for many of them the first rule of golf they read will be the one they write. And if the few knowledgeable players do come up with some workable rules, you know the remainder will be complaining just as much as they do now.

I will start to follow PGA rules when I start to play PGA golf.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using MyGolfSpy

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I will start to follow PGA rules when I start to play PGA golf.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using MyGolfSpy

I could certainly be wrong, but I don't think that there are PGA rules, are there?

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I could certainly be wrong, but I don't think that there are PGA rules, are there?

Well, whenever they get a drop of rain they immediately go to lift, clean and cheat.

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A lot of simplified rules in here that were needed even if they don't help speed up the game. The rules have been to confusing to find and interpret in many cases. I do find the double hit interesting as I thought you would at least have to count each strike but that isn't how I read it.

 

You have never had to count each strike.  It has always been the stroke you made, plus one penalty stroke, no matter how many times you actually contacted the ball.

 

I could certainly be wrong, but I don't think that there are PGA rules, are there?

Never have been.  When the proposed revisions were announced in March, 2017, a number of PGA players thought it was time for the PGA to develop their own rules.

https://www.golf.com/tour-news/2017/03/01/rules-golf-pros-have-love-hate-relationship-proposed-changes

See the posts by Daniel Berger and Graham DeLaet.

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Generally, pretty good rule changes for the average player.  

 

I found the Unplayable Ball in a Bunker change interesting.  I suppose it helps the beginner that can't hit out of sand, but the relief outside the bunker back-on-the-line with a 2-stroke penalty means that most likely they will have another chance to put it in the bunker!!

 

A few weeks ago I had an embedded ball under the lip of a bunker on #18.  I had to take a one stroke penalty and drop in the bunker, which I would do in any case.  In this circumstance there was no option to drop outside the bunker because the pond is back-on-the-line relief.

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You have never had to count each strike. It has always been the stroke you made, plus one penalty stroke, no matter how many times you actually contacted the ball.

 

Never have been. When the proposed revisions were announced in March, 2017, a number of PGA players thought it was time for the PGA to develop their own rules.

https://www.golf.com/tour-news/2017/03/01/rules-golf-pros-have-love-hate-relationship-proposed-changes

See the posts by Daniel Berger and Graham DeLaet.

if you read my post again I never said you ever had to count each strike. Said I though they might go to that.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using MyGolfSpy

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