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NiftyNiblick

Golf For Most of Us?

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If that course is in Florida I would have to lay up on number 10.

 

 

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If that course is in Florida I would have to lay up on number 10.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using MyGolfSpy

It's downhill, Rev, and thus not in Florida!.

See how short 18 is coming back up the hill?

You're confident in hitting driver straight and the green is deep.

I really think that you're there on number ten, probably with 3-wood in the right conditions. .

Short is better than long there, anyway.  No issues.

I've had to sink tough putts for five going long.

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I'm not sure why anyone would be opposed to courses like this. It looks like this would be challenging for all skill levels, but has the balance to make it an enjoyable round as well.

 

 

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Where is this club Nifty? I see a road trip in my future...

It's in Methuen, Massachusetts, about thirty miles north of Boston.

If you're on the airport side of Boston, it's little more than a half-hour drive.

If you're on the west side of Boston (The Country Club, Brookline!), it's an hour--still not bad.

 

(And if you're in Exeter, it's almost a walk! I just noticed your location.)

 

Some holes were moved (compared to this old original scorecard) around 2008

when the course was completely restored after flooding issues__

and after the Merrimack River overflowed in a terrible storm a few years earlier--

completely new drainage system among other things.

But the differences aren't major in terms of how the course plays--

just as Donald Ross designed it to play in 1906.

 

The tennis is also gone in favor of new houses being built near the course..

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If that course is in Florida I would have to lay up on number 10.

While that course isn't in Florida, my home course here in Tallahassee (Hilaman) has a 217 yard par 3, 17th hole, with trees both left and right, and OB just left where the trees are.  It's incredibly tight, and that 217 yards from the tips plays at least 10 yards longer, as I have to hit a 4 wood to reach it, which 99% of the time I miss.  The course itself is only 6,333 yards from the tips, so it's easily manageable for all sorts of level of golfers, except for this one hole.  And I've actually considered whether or not laying up on this hole makes more sense.  

 

What makes this one hole even worse is that the green is severely undulated, and if you hit into the right side of the green, your ball will roll off and into a valley of fringe, much like what the pros had to deal with at Shinnecock, where only the best of shots stayed on the green.  Bluntly put, this one par 3 is probably one of the hardest par 3s I've ever played, from any course I play, and I get to play this hole once a week at minimum.

 

I played a quick nine after work last night and decided to play the back nine.  I got to #17 and cranked a 4 wood, which actually hit the green and ended up on the back behind the green, where I had a nasty little chip to a green which slopes from back to front.  Anything above the hole on this hole is nearly impossible to stop.  So I took caution with my chip and it just didn't take the slope the way I hoped it would, and left myself with about a 25 footer straight down the hill.  Only by some miracle did I happen to make that putt.

 

Honestly, I don't care who you are, this one hole is just about impossible to par, unless you make a miracle shot out of the three you are attempting, such as I did last night.

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Sounds like a pretty tough hole, G.

 

A well designed hole gives you at least one smart way to play it.

If it doesn't, it should be considered for alteration.

Unless it's the top handicap hole on that side,  1 or 2,

in which case par is supposed to feel special.

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I hate par 3's... the less the better!

They're the holes that still give you longer clubs into greens, S&B.

 

The way people are bombing their drivers now, the sets may as well be driver, six wedges, and a putter!

 

It's fun hitting a four iron--from a perfect lie--at a green now and then.

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I hate par 3's... the less the better!

There is a course nearby with 7 par 3s and 3 play over 200 yards.

I always think that I should be able to shoot in the low 70's when I go out there but inevitably the par 3s screw me up and I walk away in the 80's. The par 3s are just mean, one has a 210 carry over a ravine and one has a 215 carry over a lake. Who does that?

I hate that course!

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I hate par 3's... the less the better!

If I designed a golf course there would be six par 3s, six par 4s and six par 5s.  I've always wanted an equal distribution of par holes for the golf course, and I've never understood why we have so many more par 4s then 3s and 5s.  Makes no sense to me.

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Sounds like a pretty tough hole, G.

 

A well designed hole gives you at least one smart way to play it.

If it doesn't, it should be considered for alteration.

Unless it's the top handicap hole on that side,  1 or 2,

in which case par is supposed to feel special.

Interestingly enough it's the #6 handicap hole, probably because it's a par 3, which usually never is rated the #1 or #2 handicap hole on a golf course.  The par 4 11th, which is a beast of a dogleg left par 4 is #2, and the par 5 16th is rated #4, which frankly, I don't understand, because that's an easy par 5 to me.  I guess 16 is considered hard by a lot of players, because there is a lake to the right and OB to the left that makes hitting a long and straight tee shot a requirement.  

 

I guess a big part of #17 to me is now mental, as that hole has gotten inside my head, to where I'm already thinking about the tee shot there when I am hitting into #16 and see that bastard to my left waiting for me.  I guess that's similar to how the pros feel with #17 at Sawgrass.  They have that hole in mind when they are teeing off on #1 and know it's coming.  Same mental olympics I am going through I guess.

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If I designed a golf course there would be six par 3s, six par 4s and six par 5s.  I've always wanted an equal distribution of par holes for the golf course, and I've never understood why we have so many more par 4s then 3s and 5s.  Makes no sense to me.

There's a course near me VERY CLOSE to that, GSwag.

 

Seven par 3s, five par 5s, and only six par fours. It's a par 70 instead of the par 72 that your course would be. But it's a great layout.

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There's a course near me VERY CLOSE to that, GSwag.

 

Seven par 3s, five par 5s, and only six par fours. It's a par 70 instead of the par 72 that your course would be. But it's a great layout.

I always think par is irrelevant when determining if a course is worth playing or not. I can be challenged by 120yd par 3's just as easily as 600yd par 5's.

 

What I look for in a course is whether or not it made me think about what shots I could play, if I had multiple options of how to play hole, and the green complexes. I have found some short courses that engage my brain throughout and long courses that are boring marches up and back across a property.

 

 

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I guess a big part of #17 to me is now mental, as that hole has gotten inside my head, to where I'm already thinking about the tee shot there when I am hitting into #16 and see that bastard to my left waiting for me.

 

You do realize that everybody has a hole like that, G, right?

 

I had #4 at Crystal Lake

#3 at Trull Brook.

#5 at Hickory Hill.

 

I could hear them laughing as I approached the tee,

 

I'm lucky that there wasn't a grenade in my ball pocket.

By that time, I was so unnerved that I may have tried hitting it off the tee.

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I always think par is irrelevant when determining if a course is worth playing or not. I can be challenged by 120yd par 3's just as easily as 600yd par 5's.

 

What I look for in a course is whether or not it made me think about what shots I could play, if I had multiple options of how to play hole, and the green complexes. I have found some short courses that engage my brain throughout and long courses that are boring marches up and back across a property.

 

 

 

I wasn't quite up to the level of looking for a challenge as you do, palvord.

 

Walking from my car to my cart was a challenge on some mornings, depending on the night before.

Without a large Dunkin Donuts coffee in my hand on the way, I might not have made it.

 

I was looking for a course that wouldn't stop me on cuts before I went the distance.

Until you're down to about a five handicap, I figured that this was what golf was about.

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I always think par is irrelevant when determining if a course is worth playing or not. I can be challenged by 120yd par 3's just as easily as 600yd par 5's.

 

What I look for in a course is whether or not it made me think about what shots I could play, if I had multiple options of how to play hole, and the green complexes. I have found some short courses that engage my brain throughout and long courses that are boring marches up and back across a property.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using MyGolfSpy

 

Yup, good point.  The two courses closest to me are both 9 hole and both use two tee boxes.  My playing partner just commented last week while we were have a post round brew that these are nearly as challenging the Jack Nicklaus Old Works GC.  Both the 9 hole courses have much more tree challenges and one has more blind tee shots and/or approaches. I use to think that 9 hole courses were kind of like kissing your sister and generally not as challenging as most 18 hole courses - I've changed my viewpoint on this.

 

As for 18 hole courses, crammed onto 80 acres, being "the future of course layouts", I'm hoping not.  I like my golf courses big and sprawling.  I don't care for compressed layouts where fairways pass one another like interstates and greens and tees are so close you can see which brand balls the other group is playing.  

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  I like my golf courses big and sprawling.  I don't care for compressed layouts where fairways pass one another like interstates and greens and tees are so close you can see which brand balls the other group is playing.  

 I find those sprawling  courses unfair.  They only give you one fairway to aim at.  

 

The course in the OP is similar to the one I play most days.  Par 69, just over 6000 yards on 110 acres.  Still a challenge.  Lots of up and down.  The greens were built in the 1920s and have some slope to them.     

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If I designed a golf course there would be six par 3s, six par 4s and six par 5s.  I've always wanted an equal distribution of par holes for the golf course, and I've never understood why we have so many more par 4s then 3s and 5s.  Makes no sense to me.

I played one of those courses in Phoenix.  Not very memorable; every hole was parallel to the last one... back and forth.  

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