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What is the difference of Hitter vs Swinger


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54 minutes ago, NiftyNiblick said:

I'm not familiar with them.

I'm not a big pro golf fan.

All rules have exceptions, though.

They both have very short backswings and are two of the longer players on tour.  Distance isn’t dependent on swing length. You say jack was a swinger yet he had a pretty big swing and his distance would put him in the hitter club.

the terms hitter and imo are useless in golf. I saw over on wrx a discussion related to these terms and someone using their terms to describe who could/should play a couple Project X shafts. It gave me a good chuckle because I’ve seeb the opposite type of golfer the person was describing play both of the shafts.

instructors, fitters, companies have to find terms to market themselves or skill sets to the public and imo that’s all these terms do

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My point was that in my mind, hitter versus swinger wasn't primarily a matter of results,  that including distance.

To me, hitter versus swinger is only a matter of what the stroke looks like.

I see swinging as smooth centrifugal force while hitting is muscling the ball with a late wrist break hitting from the inside.

Thicker, less flexible players tend to be hitters in my mind's eye.

 

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For me, the difference between swinger and hitter is swinging focuses on the movement of the arms to create speed and is usually associated with the classic players of years past; it was difficult to play any other way when clubs had hickory shafts. Hitting focuses on using the whole body to create angles and appeals to modern players, many of whom are young and strong and perhaps eager to prove they're athletes.

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1 hour ago, DonW468 said:

For me, the difference between swinger and hitter is swinging focuses on the movement of the arms to create speed and is usually associated with the classic players of years past; it was difficult to play any other way when clubs had hickory shafts. Hitting focuses on using the whole body to create angles and appeals to modern players, many of whom are young and strong and perhaps eager to prove they're athletes.

Would you consider Hogan, Jack, Arnie, Trevino and Player hitters or swingers

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There can be a difference, but there doesn’t have to be a difference between a swinger and a hitter. There are high hdcps and low hdcps in both camps. The only thing that really matters is intent and the task you decide on applying to the “hit” or “swing”. Your body is great at completing any task you give it.

You can “hit” the ball in any manner you can think of, just as you can “swing” through or at the ball in any manner. Intent is the key.


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8 hours ago, MindBodyGolf said:

There can be a difference, but there doesn’t have to be a difference between a swinger and a hitter. There are high hdcps and low hdcps in both camps. The only thing that really matters is intent and the task you decide on applying to the “hit” or “swing”. Your body is great at completing any task you give it.

You can “hit” the ball in any manner you can think of, just as you can “swing” through or at the ball in any manner. Intent is the key.

So are you saying that the difference isn't a physical one as much as a mental one?  That hit v. swing is really a feel thing, rather than a specific set of movements or sequence?  I wouldn't disagree with that, and I can see a change in feel (I need to "hit" a little more) as a productive thing for some players, and a detriment for others.

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So are you saying that the difference isn't a physical one as much as a mental one?  That hit v. swing is really a feel thing, rather than a specific set of movements or sequence?  I wouldn't disagree with that, and I can see a change in feel (I need to "hit" a little more) as a productive thing for some players, and a detriment for others.


Absolutely. I could have zero intent when signaling my body to hit the ball, or I could have an intent to hit down on it, hit up on it, hit the back of the ball, etc. Same with a “swing” thought. I could swing at the ball, swing at a target down the range or hole, swing through the ball, etc.

I think you can be successful with either, but you must have an intent that serves your goal with regards to what you want the ball to do. I think this is where a lot of amateurs miss out and something instruction in general doesn’t discuss often enough or at all. A lot of issues can be solved in a swing, just by specifying the task and giving your mind and body intent.




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I’ve thought about this post again and still believe the different methods are relative to ability.

A hitters momentum will quit at the ball in an effort to focus solely on contact.

Swingers are balanced golfers who are confident in returning the face to the ball. They let their momentum continue through the ball.

Save any further philosophy it doesn’t seem that complicated of a concept.


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1 hour ago, bens197 said:

I’ve thought about this post again and still believe the different methods are relative to ability.

A hitters momentum will quit at the ball in an effort to focus solely on contact.

Swingers are balanced golfers who are confident in returning the face to the ball. They let their momentum continue through the ball.

Save any further philosophy it doesn’t seem that complicated of a concept.



 

I don't define a hitter as someone whose momentum stops at the ball.

Palmer, Player, and Trevino were all hitters whose momentum didn't stop at the ball.

A hitter's follow through generally flies up the target line rather than releasing smoothly behind the hitter's back

as is what happens with swingers.

Hitters finish leaning forward rather than with a reverse C-shaped back.

 

 

 

 

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Imho, a hit is predominantly a push . In TGM  terms , the swing is being powered predominantly with the straightening thrust action of the right arm (release of 'Power Accumulator PA1' - feels like a push on the handle) similar to the punch shot with hands leading the clubhead into impact.  Swinging is usually defined as a pulling action where CF forces get induced by the 'Law Of The Flail'  whereas hitting overrides that CF effect. The paradox here is all muscles in the human body pull  (ie. muscle 'contractions' shorten and stretch) so in theory the feel of a push is really a muscular pull ( you can find contradictions all over the place in golf theory if you look deeply enough).

I suspect in a real life golf action , there is a mix of both hitting and swinging, so maybe we are all 'swing-hitters' and maybe the categorisation of  a golf action being one or the other can get blurry. But I can imagine if you are a strong muscular bulky individual (especially in the upper body/shoulder area) who has problems creating a full range of upper pivot motion to 'swing'  the golf club, you may decide to use your 'shoulder girdle /triceps/biceps'  to 'hit'  power the golf swing.

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