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GolfSpy Stroker

Where is your putter shaft located and why?

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I've always used a heel shafted putter...probably because that was the most common...but have toyed with the idea of trying a center shafted model.

Anyone make the switch/try both and notice much of a difference?  Visually, it just seems that it might be easier to be consistent ...  I have a tendency to push when I don't close the toe enough and then I over-correct and pull because I close the toe too early.

Thoughts?  

BTW - I found a couple of cheap Odyssey #5 on flea bay for around 20-30 bucks I was thinking about.  One can never have too many!!

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If you have a strong preference for non-offset putters as I did,

center shaft models outnumber heel-shafted ones by quite a bit.

I think that non-offset and minimal toe hang go together somehow,

so balance is also a major consideration.

 

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I've always had a heel shafted putter.  I've never tried anything else.  Food for thought.

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The location the Shaft would intersect the head influences the rate of rotation for the putter. Based on your miss pattern you can help to correct the miss with the shaft location and offset. This is generally related to the putters toe hang. This is not hosel type or where the hosel connects to the head. I am addressing the point where if you were to draw a line straight down the shaft from butt end to the head that the string would intersect the head.

 

Based on my tendencies, I need a putter that is close to heel shafted, minimal offset, and almost toe down. My stroke is left biased and I stand off the ball. because of this I need more toe hang so the putter is a bit open at impact.

 

Center shafted putters are interesting in the fact that they don’t generally have a rotation bias. The can rotate open as easily as closed. They are generally face balanced with Seemore being an exception to that rule.

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I know that where the shaft intersects the head is what matters but, I would much rather have a double bend shaft in the heel as opposed to a center shafted model. For whatever reason, it messes with my head and I hit it off the toe. I always think the shaft needs to be on heel. It seems like it would be easier move the face left or right, (even though it isn't). 

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I know that where the shaft intersects the head is what matters but, I would much rather have a double bend shaft in the heel as opposed to a center shafted model. For whatever reason, it messes with my head and I hit it off the toe. I always think the shaft needs to be on heel. It seems like it would be easier move the face left or right, (even though it isn't). 


Perception of how the putter is acting during the stroke and how our vision impacts the stroke are two areas that people neglect. These feels are causing you to change your stroke. Not every putter works for everyone. I don’t personally think a center shafted putter provides much benefit.
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51 minutes ago, cnosil said:

 


Perception of how the putter is acting during the stroke and how our vision impacts the stroke are two areas that people neglect. These feels are causing you to change your stroke. Not every putter works for everyone. I don’t personally think a center shafted putter provides much benefit.

 

No benefit at all.  In fact, most top fitters steer customers away from them

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don't get me wrong but isn't the idea behind putting to hit the ball with a square face on your intended line?  that may not guarantee a make - especially if your line is off - but at least if you can consistently hit the ball in the middle with a square face you have a good start.

now whether that happens with the shaft in the middle, in the heel, in the back, on the toe....whatever....as long as you can execute repeatedly what does it matter?

Like you said, not every putter works for everyone....the CS model helped Zach win some majors and a few tournaments.... but then that was just him; many others have done it other ways.

This is a blurb on CS vs heel...

Most putters are heel powered - that is, the motion is generated from the heel, which is where the shaft enters the putter head. Unless of course the putter is center shafted. This is pertinent because as the energy/power in a stroke dissipates (deceleration), the toe will have a tendency to continue closing. If there is too much acceleration through impact the toe will have a tendency to remain open and leads to missed putts to the right (speaking as a right hander). If you tend to accelerate (too much!) or decelerate through impact you might want to try a center shafted putter.

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don't get me wrong but isn't the idea behind putting to hit the ball with a square face on your intended line? 


My answer to that is that it depends on your stroke and ball position. For my stroke I need the putter to be slightly open to the intended line.

Face angle accounts for 83-90% of the balls direction, based on who you are quoting. The remaining percentage is putter path. Most people have a path bias slightly left or right. Because if this a square putter at impact will start slightly offline.

My choices would be to work on the perfect stroke or accept the bias and find a putter that is slightly open at impact. This concept is the same as is done with full swing clubs.

Lots of choices for a player to make, just need to understand the impact of the decisions you make and how well they hold up under pressure.


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No benefit at all.  In fact, most top fitters steer customers away from them


Wasn’t trying to debate the merits of center shafted. I agree with that opinion but there are people that love them.
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2 minutes ago, cnosil said:

 


My answer to that is that it depends on your stroke and ball position. For my stroke I need the putter to be slightly open to the intended line.

Face angle accounts for 83-90% of the balls direction, based on who you are quoting. The remaining percentage is putter path. Most people have a path bias slightly left or right. Because if this a square putter at impact will start slightly offline.

My choices would be to work on the perfect stroke or accept the bias and find a putter that is slightly open at impact. This concept is the same as is done with full swing clubs.

Lots of choices for a player to make, just need to understand the impact of the decisions you make and how well they hold up under pressure.

 

 

And that is where offset comes in. The more bias you you need to correct for, the more offset you need. 

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To say that there is NO benefit AT ALL is short-sighted and myopic....

Why Center Shafted Putters?

Center-shafted putters are exactly what you’d think they would be: putters with a shaft that connects in the center of the club head instead of on the side. This configuration has some advantages, especially if you’re right eye dominant. The best putters are the ones that increase your line of sight and help you putt better; for some people center-shafted is the ideal choice.

Most center-shafted putters are face-balanced, meaning that the weight is evenly distributed between the heel and the toe of the club. Face-balancing is best for a player who swings straight back and follows through with a straight stroke. The center-shafting allows a player to move their hands lower on the grip, moving the swing axis closer to the ball. This position gives a golfer better control and more feedback.

Center-shafted putters shine at allowing you to move into a position where you’re standing directly over the ball. With the shaft slightly behind the head and your eye right over the ball, missing your putts isn’t an option if you’re right eye dominant or lack an eye dominance. Left eye dominant players may still struggle for an ideal view of their ball, though.

Still, some players prefer the added challenge that heel-shafted putters provide. If you tend to swing in an arc, the center-shafted putter isn’t going to be the best option for you, since it typically demands a pendulum-style swing. Other players find that playing most of their game with heel-balanced clubs before switching to a center-shafted putter on the green is disorienting.

Next time you find yourself three-putting with a vengeance, consider adding a center-shafted putter to your bag. Not only will it give you more control by minimizing the need to involve your wrists when you putt, it’ll improve your visual on the ball, making those nifty alignment aids easier to use.

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1 minute ago, cnosil said:

 


Wasn’t trying to debate the merits of center shafted. I agree with that opinion but there are people that love them.

 

Oh absolutely - options are great.  And I am sure there are people that putt best with a center shafted putter. But there's a reason that you almost never see them played on tour and most companies only have one or two in their lineup - they simply aren't the best performance option for the majority of golfers.

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And that is where offset comes in. The more bias you you need to correct for, the more offset you need. 


From what I have been shown: if you start the ball too far right increase offset and too far left decrease offset.

You can also change shaft intersection point, weight, or grip style. It is all about finding the right configuration to work for all length putts.
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Both of the putters I used this year are face-balanced, but one has a center shaft, the other a heel shaft. I feel like the center shafted putter has a tendency to rotate more easily, but probably has more to do with the lower MOI than my heel shafted putter. I go through good and bad phases with both of them but my stance at address feels more natural/comfortable to me with the center shafted putter. Does it all mean anything? I have no idea, but I continue to be a streaky putter.

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6 minutes ago, MaxEntropy said:

Both of the putters I used this year are face-balanced, but one has a center shaft, the other a heel shaft. I feel like the center shafted putter has a tendency to rotate more easily, but probably has more to do with the lower MOI than my heel shafted putter. I go through good and bad phases with both of them but my stance at address feels more natural/comfortable to me with the center shafted putter. Does it all mean anything? I have no idea, but I continue to be a streaky putter.

Thanks Max!  Just what I was looking for.  👍

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To say that there is NO benefit AT ALL is short-sighted and myopic....>

 

We all have opinions based on what we have learned. Center shafted may be perfect for you, I have just been taught that they cause more problems than they help. Find the putter that works for you center shafted or not but I don’t think my dismissal of center shafted is either short sighted or myopic. I have used center shafted, even center shafted with offset and after learning more about how my stroke works won’t go back to one.

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1 minute ago, cnosil said:

 


We all have opinions based on what we have learned. Center shafted may be perfect for you, I have just been taught that they cause more problems than they help. Find the putter that works for you center shafted or not but I don’t think my dismissal of center shafted is either short sighted or myopic.

 

..I guess we'll have to disagree on this one.  if you would have said it didn't have any benefit at all for you then of course...but to make a blanket statement that there is no benefit whatsoever is an opinion and not a fact.

 

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..I guess we'll have to disagree on this one.  if you would have said it didn't have any benefit at all for you then of course...but to make a blanket statement that there is no benefit whatsoever is an opinion and not a fact.
 


We will have to disagree on this. I am basing my statements on what I have been taught by a putting specific instructor who has done extensive research on the impact of shaft location
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One of the guys I play with during the week has a center-shafted putter, and he does very well with it although I don't know why, but he sets up off the ball.  I've tried them and they don't work for me, but I set up with my eyes on top of the ball, and heel-shafted face-balanced putters work better; some a lot better than others though.  I probably need a high MOI putter because I am not looking at the ball when I make the stroke.  I suppose I miss exact center a little (not much), so the center-shaft putter would tend to twist a little more.

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