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I made the switch to vice two years ago and have shot some of the best rounds of my life playing the vice pro plus. I have noticed no distance difference between the vice and the taylormade tour preferred x that I played prior to. Want to see if anyone else out there has been playing the vice and your thoughts and how does the vice pro plus compare to the smell mtb black. 

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Tried them both. I'm a Snell fan, so my opinion may be slightly biased. I feel the black spins less off the tee than the pro, and certainly more into the greens. That's not surprising, because snells entire philosophy on ball design starts from the green back. It's softer feeling too.

Of course these are just one man's opinions, I have no other data to back up them up. In the end, it's what works best for you. I continue to play the black.

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I feel both balls perform similarly, but the MTB  Black is more durable. 

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IMO and depending on your skill level it's not going to matter much if any what ball you play as long as....*  Look I'm not an expert golfer by any means but I carry a fairly low single digit hcp. So I'm an OK golfer I suppose and I've been playing for 50 years there about. I can score my best (and worst) rounds with any top quality - urethane cover ball. I do this regularly. Doesn't matter if it's a Snell, Titleist, Chrome, TP, MG, etc., etc. There are still others. They're all very good. For any of us regular hackers you're aren't going to turn into Joe Pro simply by playing a Titleist PV or TP5 for example over a Snell or Vice. Quick story: I recently shot a mid-70's round playing a Titleist Tru-Soft I'd found. It's a budget ball without a urethane cover. How can that be? Would I have broken par if only I'd played a more expensive ball with a urethane cover. How about a Snell or Vice? Seriously doubt it.

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What he said ^^^^^^^^^ .     They're all good.  At our level of play, it boils down to personal preference. I don't think I'm capable of discerning any significant difference between the higher end golf balls (and that includes Vice and Snell).  I might "sense" some slight feel differences off the driver or off the putter because of the softness of the ball, but performance wise probably not.

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Personal preference is indeed king here, but so too is price point and I would add (for me at least), skill level.

I "prefer" the MTB Black. It's price-point is more than fair for the quality you receive, and therefore is less painful when one (or several) are lost due to poor play like a 20-hcp like me tends to do. I want a "premium" ball that I can afford simply because I do not to have any doubts about the quality of my equipment holding me back from better scores potentially.

Last season, I was afforded the honor to be among the few selected by MGS to test Snell's MTB Reds and at the time I was fitted for and playing Bridgestone's E6 Soft line. The subsequent testing I performed for the review really opened my eyes to the myriad of differences between all types of golf balls. Along with my continuing findings at the time, @PlaidJacket started a fun little thing with the first annual MGS Hard Rock Challenge that further opened my eyes that there is some true stinkers out there that need to be avoided at all costs. I tested everything I could get my hands on, from Noodles, to Taylormades, to Top Flites, but based all my observations off of the "gold-standard" of the "#1 most lost ball in the world" 😜, the PV1. Even at my particular skill set, it was easy to see, and feel and observe differences like spin, green-holding ability, distance control and durability compared to Titleist's flagship offering. Ultimately for me, I landed on the Snell MTB Black simply because it checked all the boxes that were important to me.

Now in the spirit of this thread, I have to say that I've only had a very short experience with a Vice ball. I found one (a Pro in neon red), and put it to play one day. It was just "OK" for me but my first impression was that this particular model felt hard off of driver and that's off-putting for me since I like a softer feel there. Again...PREFERENCE. I'm sure Vice makes a damn good product, and maybe even one that rivals the big boys, but for me, I "prefer" the Snell MTB Black.

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My main issue with balls is I can’t loose them fast enough. I always look and usually find mine plus one or two other ‘pro level balls’ - that’s what I call a ball good enough to be played on the tours. I keep those and toss the crap back.

Doing this has caused me to use about 1 or 2 new sleeves of balls per year. I’ve still got unopened boxes of pro v1x’s from 2010 when I got a few dozen for playing in a few tournaments lol. So I literally cannot lose them fast enough. I hate loosing balls and always look. If you know where to look you’ll always find a few keepers. Look on the right side at roughly 200 yards from the tee and you’ll find top flights. Look at nearly 275 yards and up and the balls get nicer. Look on the left side at this distance and up and almost all balls will be good to keep due to better players using better balls. They hit them further and usually hook is the shot shape better players miss with.

Sorry I can’t comment on the balls. Only vice and snell balls I’ve used have been found. Lol. I will say it seems I find a lot more vice balls vs Snell


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14 hours ago, Bbaum215 said:

I made the switch to vice two years ago and have shot some of the best rounds of my life playing the vice pro plus. I have noticed no distance difference between the vice and the taylormade tour preferred x that I played prior to. Want to see if anyone else out there has been playing the vice and your thoughts and how does the vice pro plus compare to the smell mtb black. 

Currently playing the MTB Black and I'll be going back to Vice as I prefer the feel. Performance is very similar, but feel is noticeably different - at least to me. It's not that the Snell feels bad, but it's not my preferred feel plain and simple. My best advice to you is that if you think you want to try it, give it a shot and if you don't like it you can go back when deplete your stock. Both are great balls IMO and I will say that the finish on the Snell is better than that of the Vice. If you play a white Vice golf ball, you know how easily they stain due to the flat finish. The Snell has a clear coat on it and looks better for a longer period of time.

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On 3/14/2019 at 11:36 AM, B81Smith said:

My main issue with balls is I can’t loose them fast enough. I always look and usually find mine plus one or two other ‘pro level balls’ - that’s what I call a ball good enough to be played on the tours. I keep those and toss the crap back.

Doing this has caused me to use about 1 or 2 new sleeves of balls per year. I’ve still got unopened boxes of pro v1x’s from 2010 when I got a few dozen for playing in a few tournaments lol. So I literally cannot lose them fast enough. I hate loosing balls and always look. If you know where to look you’ll always find a few keepers. Look on the right side at roughly 200 yards from the tee and you’ll find top flights. Look at nearly 275 yards and up and the balls get nicer. Look on the left side at this distance and up and almost all balls will be good to keep due to better players using better balls. They hit them further and usually hook is the shot shape better players miss with.

Sorry I can’t comment on the balls. Only vice and snell balls I’ve used have been found. Lol. I will say it seems I find a lot more vice balls vs Snell


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This is a highly accurate depiction of where you find golf ball on a course! 

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