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For measuring the green area on Google Earth, I click the little ruler icon, and then select the Polygon tab.  Then you can define the perimeter of the green by clicking any number of points, and Google will tell you both the perimeter and the area.  Its moderately accurate for irregularly shaped areas.

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2 hours ago, GolfSpy MPR said:

So here's an example of why I suspect our course is more difficult than its length would suggest. This is the 13th hole, which Google Earth measures right at 350 yards, a pretty modest par 4.

image.png

This is the smallest green on the course, roughly 60 feet deep and 40 feet wide.

The widest point at which it is wooded on both sides is 40 yards; the fairway is only 30 yards wide. It narrows to 26(!) yards just before the green. Unless you have total control over your driver, you can't hit it here. Mostly likely, you'll have at least 150 yards into the green, and that shot must be shaped, because you're looking at this (from the course website):

hole-13-2-1024x682.jpg

Also notice that if you happen to miss right, you're dead, because that slope on the right of the green will kick your ball into the woods.

Why am I posting this? Mostly because I want to feel better about playing a 6,000 yard course 🙂

30 yards is generous for several landing areas at my course; the difference between your course and mine is you have lots of trees to contend with and I have mounds in the rough with uphill, downhill and sidehill lies.  Your course is more visually intimidating.

We have many holes with landing areas of 40-50 yards, but several are 25-30 yards where I hit it.  On our shortest par 5 #6 hole, my landing area is about 26 yards wide with a bunker on the left and mounds on the right.  If someone hits the ball 280 off the tee, the landing area is 13 yards wide with bunkers left and right.  Probably the hardest part of the tee shot is getting through the 25 yard "goal posts" at 120y off the tee!!

 

Screen Shot 2019-04-05 at 11.54.00 AM.jpg

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22 minutes ago, DaveP043 said:

For measuring the green area on Google Earth, I click the little ruler icon, and then select the Polygon tab.  Then you can define the perimeter of the green by clicking any number of points, and Google will tell you both the perimeter and the area.  Its moderately accurate for irregularly shaped areas.

OK, so that's a super easy way to do it. I had already measured the area of all the greens using my Image J method and came up with an average of about 3880 sq. ft. with the smallest being 2400 sq. ft. and the largest 5500 sq. ft.

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A few reasons I wanted to start this thread:
  • I've had a handful of conversations with [mention=73629]GolfSpy STUDque[/mention] about how Game Golf/Arccos calculate putting stats.
  • I've seen other guys on this forum averaging over 2 putts per hole; I am well under that, but wondered how much my course (rather than my skill) was a factor in that.
  • I'm working on my own game. To get to single figures, I need to hit more greens in regulation. To what degree does green size affect that?
  • Finally, my home course (where I play almost all my golf) is short, barely over 6,000 yards from the back tees. I trying to figure out how much (if any) that lack of distance is compensated for by other challenges.
I had a hunch that the greens on my home course were fairly small. I don't play a ton of golf at other courses, but when I have, I've been amazed at the size of the greens elsewhere. Turns out, my instincts were sound. Took a moment this morning to measure the green size at my course using Google Maps. It's pretty easy: open your course in satellite view; right click on one edge of the green, choose "Measure distance," and the click the other side of the green. Then keep moving the line around to get length and width on each green. Throw it all in a spreadsheet. Maybe subtract 10–15% because the greens are ellipses, not rectangles.
Obviously, this is far from exact but it's close enough to get us in the ballpark.
Putting all that together, the greens at our course average about 3,300 square feet. Our biggest green is right around 5,000 sqft; the smallest is barely over 2,000 (which helps me understand why that hole is so hard).
For comparison's sake (and this is the only time anyone will compare our course to Pebble), the greens at Pebble Beach are the smallest on Tour, at 3,500 sqft. Apparently, the average green on Tour is closer to 6,000 sqft, which comports well with this article (from a course superintendent perspective) that greens should average about 6,000 sqft for maintenance reasons.
For my part, this is information I have to take into account when evaluating my stats. A low single-digit handicap (my long-term goal) hits half his greens in regulation; that might end up being different for me. My putting stats are likely polished by our small greens: I average about 1.75 putts, but I'm missing about 85% of GIR. I 3-putt on 10% of holes, but I imagine that number would be worse on more "normal" greens.
And Game Golf has normally hated my short game play; it might be that I'm seeing something of a course penalty there.
Anyway, how big are the greens you all play? How much do the green sizes affect your stats and your scores?

The public course here in-town has our fairways at 21 yards wide, and our greens are also small, so when I look at my “driving accuracy”, it’s way down because we’re playing US Open width fairways every time we play. Sucks. Green-wise, since ours are so small, I just hit to center and really don’t have much issue 2 putting from anywhere. When I played in Houston this week, I realized that this strategy wouldn’t work on those courses with greens being so much bigger. I would LOVE to play a course with wide fairways and big greens!!! My stats would be much better!


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Worth pointing out you should probably measure your first putt distance and give yourself an idea of a typical leave and judge off that. The idea is we should all 1 putt from 1-2 foot. Let's say you have four in a round, does that mean that 32 putts is an indication of a good round vs one where you didn't have any first putt within 15 feet and putted 36 times? Or is that just short game being good and the rest of the putts were disasters? On the opposite end (and probably closer to where I lie on the spectrum of good vs bad putts) I had 3-4 3- putts the last few rounds, but I've also had 70 footers on multiple holes.  Point is Putts per hole and GIR are great but don't think they give you an idea of where you need to work on until you dive into typical leave distance. If yours is 10% or less and you aren't hitting a lot of GIR's may just be the greens being small.

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Posted (edited)

A bit off topic, but I am going to put in my 2 cents anyway. 

- Looks like OP is tracking stats, compare your putts/round, GIR%, fairway%, driver distance, and up&down% based on handicap range in each area to identify your weaknesses to focus more practice on. (I did this and found that averaging 250 yards with a driver and 56% FIR is equivalent to a 6-10 handicap according to some data sets and was actually my strongest area. While 10-15% up & down% is a 25-30 hdcp.)

- The farther below 50% GIR you hit on average, the more important your short game to have any par chances on missed greens.

- You can develop you short game (carry distances) in an open field, or maybe even your own back yard/basement/garage space permitting. It also requires less skills/coordination than full swing because quality contact is much easier on 1/4 shots. Doing this with full swing shots while accurately measuring the output to see if you are improving is difficult if not impossible. 

- develop some backswing lengths for lag putting: inside of back foot, outside of backfoot, widen stance and then to outside of foot again. Calibrate these distances on the putting green before a round, hopefully they work out to something like 15, 25, 40 feet or 20, 30, 50 feet. Then pace off your lag putts on the course prior to hitting them. Distance control is far more important at these distances.

- get a Putt-out trainer and possibly their mat, become deadly from 4-6 feet to dial in face control for short putts. The curve of the putt out will allow you to hit it firm enough to simulate 8-10 footers on a 6' mat indoors all winter. 

Edited by BMart519

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Man these US Open greens are teeeeeeeny. Came here to see if you made a comparison for Pebble Beach and am pleasantly surprised you did. Saying 3000sqft and seeing 3000sqft are two different things in my head. These players look like giants on the greens 😂

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