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Thank you! We will get his  club ready for his next round! This is the best golf forum on the net, bar none, because of members like  deejaid. I really appreciate the help.

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Yep DJ is one class act himself--- but then again so are all the members on this site

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11 hours ago, deejaid said:

 

A fellow spy contacted me asking about the whipping of a friends 5-wood that came undone. He wondered if this is something most golf repair men still fix or if it’s something he could do on his own. I told him most old timers can probably do it, but it’s also something he could do himself, he just needed a little instruction and a few supplies.

 

Now, this diy is to show you how to re-wrap whipping that has come undone, which you can remove and reuse, or if the whipping is completely gone, using new whipping. I didn’t have any clubs that were ready for whipping on my drying rack right now so I just used an old club that I’d found that already had the whipping removed.

 

I have a few tricks to make whipping easier, like a whipping jig I built and use, but for this diy, I’m going to show you the easiest way for a guy at home in his garage using the most basic of clubbuilding tools can re-whip an old persimmon wood.

 

 

 

First put your club in a rubber golf club clamp and gently tighten so that the club is secure but can still be spun easily in the club. This is important to make winding the whipping easier.

 

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Next, grab your whipping. You can remove and reuse the old whipping or you can use new whipping. I offer 5-yard spools for DIYers that will wrap one club, so that’s what we’ll use here. Take the spool and cut off about 8 inches of whipping and set it aside, we will use this piece later.

 

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Next, take the spool and unwind it a bit. Lay the end whipping on the spool about 1/2” down the back of the shaft at the top where the whipping begins. You usually see a discoloration on the shaft to see where to start, just make sure it’s on the back of the head.

 

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Wrap around the shaft about 5 times over the end to keep it secure.

 

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Now, continue wrapping by using your right hand to guide the whipping while the left hand twists the club head to rotate the shaft in the clamp/vise.

 

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Continue wrapping the whipping tightly until you are about five wraps from the end. Take the 8” piece of whipping you cut off earlier, make a loop with it, and lay it down on the back of the club head on top of the whipping.

 

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Continue whipping over top of the loop your final five or six turns.

 

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Once you have reached the bottom, thread the end of the whipping through the loop. Pull the loop up and the end of he whipping will be tucked underneath the last five rows of whipping.

 

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Use an Exacto knife to cut the excess from the tucked pieces at the beginning and end of your wrap.

 

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Apply some clear nail polish to to keep the ends secure.

 

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And there you go. A nice, tight whipping, and an old club ready for many more rounds.

 

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Wow you're a true craftsman! I admire that kind of patience and skill. 

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Thanks for the kind words guys. I’m just trying to pass on any little bit of knowledge I have that can help keep these old clubs on the course where they belong.




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I enjoyed reading your Whipping demonstration. Nice photos too. Question... What material is the whipping made from?

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Thanks Plaid. The whipping is nylon, almost like monofilament fishing line. I believe most companies began using this type of whipping post-WWll as clubmaking came into a more modern age.

Prior to steel shafts, hickory shafted clubs used a linen whipping which was also used in the early days of steel shaft clubs too.


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Posted (edited)

I must be an old timer, I have the line and the pitch and the tool. Don't use it very often as you can imagine.

A EXCELLENT explanation.

 

and on a Macgregor Tourney ?

Edited by McGolf
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I must be an old timer, I have the line and the pitch and the tool. Don't use it very often as you can imagine.
A EXCELLENT explanation.
 
and on a Macgregor Tourney ?



Yup, an old 1961 I believe, Macgregor Tourney I found for $2. I used that for the demo just because it was sitting there in the pile with its whipping already removed. I guess I should have used a lighter colored head as it would have been easier to see the whipping. I’m just happy most of the pictures are in focus as I had my 8 year old take the pics when I didn’t have a free hand.




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Just thought I’d share a pic of @deejaid‘s persimmon handiwork in action

D4A98CC1-2512-49D4-8249-91BD5740F4DA.jpeg.4c1aba2fea717b1bdbf4e57576649c54.jpeg

Real 3-wood + frickin laser beams = happy DLK. Although the vintage wardrobe obviously still needs a lot of work.

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Thanks deejaid! I have a set of old Ping woods that belonged to my father-in-law. They need a little love and attention.


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