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Hey guys I’ve been recently having an issue where my low back is in a lot of pain and has a lot of pressure on it, and it is effecting my golf game. Does anyone have any tips to alleviate that? 

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It could be a number of reasons. Usually it’s not always the back that is the problem, it could be tight hips and/or hip flexors or something else.

best advice is to see a doc especially a chiro or physical therapist 

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I agree. I’m a strength coach by trade and do private sessions focusing on golf fitness.

Often times if you can get your glutes and hip flexors to loosen up, the pain will subside. The next thing I would look at is your mid back (thoracic spine). These two things when tight or out of alignment can cause severe back pain. Feel free to PM me if you have more questions


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Go see a doctor!

 

I had a couple of bulging discs and fixed them by foam rolling my lower back and also stretched out my hamstrings every night for 2 months, and continue a few times every week since then. Your back can be hurting for a multitude of reasons.

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Not something to mess around with. See a doctor. I know there are a several on MGS, like myself, who have had back surgeries and chronic back issues and they would likely all advise you to have a doctor examine you. Could be something significant or as others have said, relatively minor but it's important to identify which it is. Once you know what it is, you can develop a treatment plan and begin to see improvement.


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I'm sitting here at my desk, in front of my pc wincing with lower back pain.

If I move the wrong way while sitting I can let out a cry of pain (not manly I know, but it's like a hot blade sticking in sometimes).

Mine comes from 'reverse C' poor backswing while practicing, plus 2 hrs at the weekend trying to assemble chairs while in a half bending over position, I knew I would suffer later lol

I'm sure theres some decent exercises out there for sufferers like us, as long as it's only muscular and not something more serious.

Dr first I think, then do as he/she tells you.

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I have the same issues, and more, but it's my hips that get out of alignment and one leg gets shorter than the other. I see a chiropractor once a month and use an inversion table daily.

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Inversion table. Got mine off ebay for under a $100. Well worth the money

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One plane swing.

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I'm old.  I have had low back pain for years, even before I started playing golf.  However, recent changes in my swing have significantly lessened the pain.  If the pain is golf-related, then it's worthwhile to get an evaluation of your swing from a competent swing coach.  It only takes one incorrect move to put strain on the back.  Oh yeah, be sure to do your stretches before playing.

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8 hours ago, Kenny B said:

I'm old.  I have had low back pain for years, even before I started playing golf.  However, recent changes in my swing have significantly lessened the pain.  If the pain is golf-related, then it's worthwhile to get an evaluation of your swing from a competent swing coach.  It only takes one incorrect move to put strain on the back.  Oh yeah, be sure to do your stretches before playing.

We're kinda in the same boat (age wise). I started Yoga for Golf and that has helped a lot. 

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Go to a Dr first and make sure there isn’t anything wrong structurally.
If it turns out to be muscle, massages, stretching, rolling, etc are all great. I have to spend 30 minutes stretching before any round due to back issues. I go to a chiropractor, I get massages, gone to physical therapy, had injections, and even had acupuncture.
Getting an exam first is the most important step!


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Go see a doctor. Seriously. We can all talk about things we did that help *us* alleviate back pain, but none of that may be relevant to what's causing *your* pain.

Speaking purely for myself - I started doing Pilates daily about 5-6 years ago, even 10 minutes of it in the morning has made a huge difference in my life when it comes to back pain. For golf-specific things, I learned to allow my hips to rotate in the backswing, which puts far less strain on my lower back. 

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