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PING Introdcues Heppler Putters

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These offer a different look and feel from the SIGMA line, mainly with a firmer face.   Read  the Press Release below for the full details and differences in each model

PHOENIX (January 20, 2020) – Employing high-pressure aluminum casting for the first time in
the manufacturing of its putters, PING introduced the Heppler putters today, an eye-catching,
nine-model family of blades and multi-material mid-mallets and mallets differentiated by solid-
face technology and extremely high inertia properties.


The custom-fit putters are available for pre-order at authorized PING golf shops around the
world beginning today.


“With the Heppler series, we’re providing golfers a firmer-feeling putter in highly forgiving
models to ensure a choice that fits their stroke and eye,” said John K. Solheim, PING President.
“We’ve chosen a very precise manufacturing process that’s significantly advanced our ability to
create high-MOI mid-mallets and mallets by combining aerospace-grade aluminum with steel.
The contrasting copper and black finish provides alignment cues and a visually appealing,
premium look that’s attracting a lot of interest on tour.”


“Fitting continues to be an important part of our putter technology as well,” Solheim said. “We’ve
made improvements to the feel of our adjustable-length shaft technology, and the new putters
are available to fit every stroke type so golfers can find a putter to match their stance and
stroke.”


Solid-Face Technology
A firmer feel and sound is the result of the machined, flat face. The face material – either
aluminum or steel – varies by model, depending on the placement of the materials, which is
strategically positioned to maximize forgiveness and optimize the center of gravity.
Extensive testing revealed the auditory feedback of the flat metal face had a positive effect on
the player’s confidence by providing a distinct impact experience without compromising
performance.


“We saw a high percentage of testers improve their ‘Strokes Gained’ results with a Heppler
model, indicating that many golfers prefer the firmer sound and feel of a solid-face design,” said
Solheim. “We see the new putters as an appealing alternative to our Sigma 2 series, which
offers a softer feel and sound through its dual-durometer insert and TR face technology. Our
primary goal is to provide golfers a custom-fit putter with their desired feel and sound while
delivering the performance and consistency they need to hole more putts.”
Pressure-Cast Aluminum; Multi-material Designs PING engineers combined a lightweight aluminum with steel through strategic shaping and weight placement to produce extremely high MOI designs. The aluminum casting process creates precise detail and exceptional quality in the mid-mallets and mallets. The new Tomcat 14 has the highest MOI in the line and features a 14-dot alignment aid inspired by the lights on an airport runway.

“The advantage of pressure casting is we can achieve highly precise design details while
allowing our engineers much greater freedom to position weight where it benefits the putter’s
performance the most,” said Solheim. “As a result, we improved the performance of existing
models and developed two entirely new designs. Golfers will also find a variety of alignment
features to help ensure accuracy and match their preferred look.”
Black Chrome, Adjustable-Length Shaft Advancements to the adjustable-length shaft technology introduced in the Sigma 2 family
produce a firmer feel with less flexing. Finished in an eye-catching black chrome, the adjustable-
length shaft is lightweight, easy to use and sleekly concealed beneath the grip, allowing golfers
to customize length between 32" and 36" to fit their stroke and posture. The process is quick
and intuitive through the use of an adjustment tool that inserts into the top of the grip. One full
turn causes approximately a 1/4 " adjustment up or down, and the grip remains perfectly aligned
during the adjustment process.

“We’ve taken a very complex technical challenge and simplified it for the benefit of golfers,” said
Solheim. “It allows you to experiment with various lengths and ultimately fit yourself. You simply
adjust it until you’re comfortable, ideally with your eyes directly over the ball or slightly inside the
line. The performance improvements with a putter fit to the proper length are significant. We
strongly encourage golfers to take advantage of this innovative feature.”


PING Pistol Grip Options
Four PING grip designs allow golfers to find their optimal fit and feel. The PP59 is the standard
grip, inspired by the popular PP58. The PP60 is midsize and lightweight, designed to fit the
contours of the hands with flats on the top and sides. Slightly heavier, the PP61 has an
exaggerated pistol shape. The PP62, while still lightweight, has a larger, more rounded shape to
promote quieter hands.

Name Pays Tribute to Longtime Employee
The new putter family is named in honor of Rick Heppler, a longtime PING employee who
began his career with the company as a teenager in 1966. The son of a General Electric co-
worker of PING Founder Karsten Solheim, Rick was hired by Karsten to help John A. Solheim
build putters in the family garage. Rick eventually held several management positions at
Karsten Manufacturing Corporation before passing away in a motorcycle accident in 2013.
“Rick was part of the PING family for almost 50 years,” said John. “He was a dear friend who
contributed greatly to our success in all that he did. Naming this putter series after him is a
tribute to his dedication to our company and its employees.”

Heppler Models and Specifications


Anser 2
Bearing the same heel-toe weighting that helped make the original Anser 2 so popular, the
Heppler version also shares the original’s angled heel ballast. The all-steel Heppler Anser 2
stands apart with color blocking that creates its own eye-pleasing alignment assistance.
Putter Type: Blade
Material: Steel
Adjustable-Length Black Chrome Shaft: 32" to 36 "range
Head Weight: 350g
Stroke Type: Slight Arc
Lie Angle: 20° ±4°
Loft: 3° ±3°
U.S. MSRP: $245

ZB3
A larger section of the cavity was carved out and the heel-toe ballasts are larger than those in
the ZB 2 to achieve a high MOI in this strong-arc blade. The alignment dot is a product of our
research showing this cue makes aiming easier for strong-arc players.
Putter Type: Blade
Material: Steel
Adjustable-Length Black Chrome Shaft: 32" to 36" range
Head Weight: 355g
Stroke Type: Strong Arc
Lie Angle: 20° ±4°
Loft: 3° ±3°
U.S. MSRP: $245

Piper C
Players who prefer center-shafted putters will find the Piper C gives them a performance edge.
Relative to other center-shafted models, the CG is lower, and MOI is higher because of steel
heel and toe weights integrated with the aluminum body.
Putter Type: Mid-mallet

Material: Aluminum/Steel face
Adjustable-Length Black Chrome Shaft: 32"; to 36" range
Head Weight: 365g
Stroke Type: Straight
Lie Angle: 20° ±4°
Loft: 3° ±1°
U.S. MSRP: $245

Tyne 3
At address, the ratio of aluminum to steel appears to be 50/50; in fact, steel accounts for 2/3 of
the weight, created by a thick back flange, resulting in a lower, much deeper CG and a higher
MOI.
Putter Type: Mallet
Material: Aluminum face/Steel
Adjustable-Length Black Chrome Shaft: 32"; to 36" range
Head Weight: 360g
Stroke Type: Slight Arc
Lie Angle: 20° ±4°
Loft: 3° ±3°
U.S. MSRP: $270

Fetch
To elevate MOI over the Sigma 2 Fetch, which has steel bordering the center cutout, designers
used aluminum, then steel in the heel-toe ballasting for increasing forgiveness. The color
contrasting helps golfers focus on the alignment lines, causing the holed-out section to fade and
not be the primary focus.
Putter Type: Mallet
Material: Aluminum/Steel face
Adjustable-Length Black Chrome Shaft: 32" to 36" range
Head Weight: 365g
Stroke Type: Straight
Lie Angle: 20° ±2°

Loft: 3° ±3°
U.S. MSRP: $270

Ketsch
Its sole is steel, which also wraps the perimeter, a big reason this ½ steel, ½ aluminum Ketsch
nearly doubles the MOI of the PING Vault 2.0 Ketsch. Like all the Heppler mallets, it effectively
utilizes multi-material construction, and is the only putter in the family with three alignment lines,
which frame the ball.
Putter Type: Mallet
Material: Aluminum face/Steel
Adjustable-Length Black Chrome Shaft: 32" to 36" range
Head Weight: 370g
Stroke Type: Slight Arc or Straight
Lie Angle: 20° ±2°
Loft: 3° ±3°
U.S. MSRP: $270


Floki
The strong-arc mallet is enjoying popularity, and the Floki expands a player’s fitting options
while boasting the second-highest MOI in the Heppler line, owing to its 2/3 steel, 1/3 aluminum
construction. Significant steel around the perimeter prevents twisting and its copper color
contrasted against the black aluminum is designed to inspire confidence.
Putter Type: Mallet
Material: Aluminum face/Steel
Adjustable-Length Black Chrome Shaft: 32" to 36" range
Head Weight: 365g
Stroke Type: Strong Arc
Lie Angle: 20° ±4°
Loft: 3° ±3°
U.S. MSRP: $270

Tomcat 14
Airport runway lights inspired the alignment dots in the highest-MOI model in the Heppler family.
The dots get closer together front to back to simulate motion, help with eye tracking, and frame
the ball. The back ballasts are cored out and steel filled in this ½ steel, ½ aluminum putter.
Putter Type: Mallet
Material: Aluminum face/Steel
Adjustable-Length Black Chrome Shaft: 32" to 36"; range
Head Weight: 370g
Stroke Type: Slight Arc or Straight
Lie Angle: 20° ±2°
Loft: 3° ±3°
U.S. MSRP: $270


Piper Armlock
A mid-mallet is the predominant putter style among armlock players for its desirable head
shape, and this Piper relies on the same low-CG, high-MOI, heel-toe weighted Piper C head.
The difference is a double-bend shaft (std. length 41 ½”) and it attaches heel-side as opposed
to the center, a 21-inch grip, and standard loft is 6°.
Putter Type: Mid-Mallet
Material: Aluminum/Steel face
Standard length: 41.5” (Non-adjustable. Custom lengths available)
Head Weight: 355g
Stroke Type: Slight Arc or Straight
Lie Angle: 20° ±2°
Standard Loft: 6° (custom lofts available)
U.S. MSRP: $270

Visit Ping.com  to see all models

 

Heppler Anser 2.png

PING Heppler Fetch.png

PING Heppler Tomcat.png

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Uh oh....

“I like my putter. I like my putter... I like my putter...” right?

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That Heppler Tomcat 14 is sorely provoking me to take the next step in my annual off-season routine:

  • Settle on a selection of putters from my collection to compete for a spot in my bag.
  • Develop a series of tests to determine the fit of each putter for my own tendencies.
  • Complete several rounds of testing, fastidiously tracking results.
  • Crown an overall winner and award it the starting spot in my bag in April when the snow finally melts.
  • [keep waiting for the snow to melt] <--- I am here
  • Lose discipline and buy a new putter and put it in the bag in April, utterly ignoring all the previous steps.
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  • Haha 5

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Really surprised by the lack of grooves 

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Just now, GolfSpy MPR said:

That Heppler Tomcat 14 is sorely provoking me to take the next step in my annual off-season routine:

  • Settle on a selection of putters from my collection to compete for a spot in my bag.
  • Develop a series of tests to determine the fit of each putter for my own tendencies.
  • Complete several rounds of testing, fastidiously tracking results.
  • Crown an overall winner and award it the starting spot in my bag in April when the snow finally melts.
  • [keep waiting for the snow to melt] <--- I am here
  • Lose discipline and buy a new putter and put it in the bag in April, utterly ignoring all the previous steps.

The last bullet point sums up exactly how I feel about irons right now, I went into the year thinking I would decide between the recently purchased T300 and then see if any of the following releases such s G710, T400, the already OLD P790 and P790 Ti and most recently the PXG 0211 or Gen 3 0311 XP's.   

But now I'm thinkinng why bother deciding, just buy them all and fill up that corner in my office again...The struggle is real...ha

But back to the putters, I really like several of them, the Tomcat for sure as well as the FLOKI catch my eye, but having a Tyne 4 that works really well, I'd have to look at the Tyne 3 as well 🙂

 

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Just now, jlukes said:

Really surprised by the lack of grooves 

You'll want to listen to this (very short) part of a discussion with Paul Wood of PING that came out a few weeks ago: 

 

Skip ahead to almost the end, about 31:21.

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8 hours ago, jlukes said:

Really surprised by the lack of grooves 

PING isn't replacing the Sigma line with these.

The Sigma's have the insert and grooves for a soft feel. These have no inserts or grooves to give them a firm feel. PING tested the two, and found neither works better then the other, per se. This is all about options.

BTW The system that adjusts the shaft length has been "improved". Using it still changes the lie angle however, so I'll never understand why someone wouldn't just get fit for the proper head, length and lie through their custom fit process. There is no charge, and you'll have the right putter for you.

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I can’t believe the Fetch is still happening...Too many bad backs playing operation with the hole.  

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I just bought a Sigma 2 Tyne.  It ain't leaving my bag for at least 5 years.

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13 hours ago, GolfSpy MPR said:

That Heppler Tomcat 14 is sorely provoking me to take the next step in my annual off-season routine:

  • Settle on a selection of putters from my collection to compete for a spot in my bag.
  • Develop a series of tests to determine the fit of each putter for my own tendencies.
  • Complete several rounds of testing, fastidiously tracking results.
  • Crown an overall winner and award it the starting spot in my bag in April when the snow finally melts.
  • [keep waiting for the snow to melt] <--- I am here
  • Lose discipline and buy a new putter and put it in the bag in April, utterly ignoring all the previous steps. 

Something tells me that it won’t be too long before you’ve moved a step further down the list. 🤔🤔

I’m trying to convince myself that my current grooved putter is what I should be playing, because I absolutely love the feel of solid faces. It’s interesting to see more companies move away from the insert/grooved insert face style. Both Scotty and PING have come out with flat faced putters. Everything is cyclical, I suppose. 

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. Both Scotty and PING have come out with flat faced putters. Everything is cyclical, I suppose. 


Pings are “flat” (no mill lines) and multi piece, scottys still have mill lines but the head is basically milled from single block of steel.
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9 hours ago, GB13 said:

Something tells me that it won’t be too long before you’ve moved a step further down the list. 🤔🤔

I’m trying to convince myself that my current grooved putter is what I should be playing, because I absolutely love the feel of solid faces. It’s interesting to see more companies move away from the insert/grooved insert face style. Both Scotty and PING have come out with flat faced putters. Everything is cyclical, I suppose. 

Just to summarize the audio from Paul Wood (of PING) that I linked to above, PING found in their testing that:

  • Putters with face tech objectively helped people stop the ball closer to the hole, but that
  • Putters without face tech made people feel like they had better distance control, and that that confidence produced measurably good results.

At the risk of a bit of oversimplification, it ended up something like this: putters with face tech reduced three-putts, while putters without face tech increased one-putts. He concludes by saying that the magic would be found (presumably, PING is working on this) with some that has the feel of no-tech but the objective benefits of tech.

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23 hours ago, Golfspy_CG2 said:

The last bullet point sums up exactly how I feel about irons right now, I went into the year thinking I would decide between the recently purchased T300 and then see if any of the following releases such s G710, T400, the already OLD P790 and P790 Ti and most recently the PXG 0211 or Gen 3 0311 XP's. (and the D7 Forged)* 

But now I'm thinkinng why bother deciding, just buy them all and fill up that corner in my office again...The struggle is real...ha

But back to the putters, I really like several of them, the Tomcat for sure as well as the FLOKI catch my eye, but having a Tyne 4 that works really well, I'd have to look at the Tyne 3 as well 🙂

 

*There, I fixed it for you.  😁

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7 minutes ago, JohnSmalls said:

*There, I fixed it for you.  😁

Yeah, the D7 Forged should definitely have been on that list, but a man only has so much time and space...ha

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2 hours ago, cnosil said:

 


Pings are “flat” (no mill lines) and multi piece, scottys still have mill lines but the head is basically milled from single block of steel.

 

Yeah, I’m just saying that both companies were using inserts before, and both moved away from them. I suppose “solid” faces would have been more accurate.

 

 

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Yeah, I’m just saying that both companies were using inserts before, and both moved away from them. I suppose “solid” faces would have been more accurate.

 

 

Pretty sure Ping is still a multi-piece like the Cameron’s were. I’ll take a closer look next time I am at headquarters.

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