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Tsecor

How many different balls do you carry in your bag?

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ive read that article 10x and looked at those charts 500x which is probably why i have 9 different golf balls in my bag.....so many great options. I just wonder if its really costing me strokes as the article suggests. 
 
 

By the way, like you pointed out, TXG does some really good videos with ball comparisons, and they even try to say what type of player would be best suited to that ball, and they’re even testing a couple of this year’s against each other already. Good info!

For me, I did take to heart what the MGS study said: find one, play one. Would it hurt to play B’stone AND Pro V1X? As an amateur who doesn’t play all that often, probably not, but I want to know my distances off my irons and wedges, and how much roll-out I get. If I switch amongst a few different ones, it’s likely I’ll be getting different yardages, and release on greens. So, I play Pro V1X. Feel, distances, reaction around the greens, what they do off my wedges on various shots, etc, I can “expect” certain results. That’s a major factor in improving, and scoring. You may miss a birdie or par here-and-there just because you’ve played two different balls in a round and your yardages changed. Spin changed. Launch changed. Creep up the wedge face changed, etc.
Anyway, I’ve chosen to use one ball just to have consistency and TRUST in that part of my game. Makes me more confident.


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Mookie this may sound funny but I choose a ball depending on weather conditions that day. Good example in a previous post I stated that the other day I played a TM Project A. The reason I did that was because it was cold and windy. I have no problems spinning any ball because by design I hit a trap cut. I did not need the spin a Pro V or a Snell MTB gives me. Now it being a scramble I had a Pro V in my pocket in case we missed a green and needed to chip. And I did putt with the Pro V. If it had been real golf I would have more than likely putted with the Project A anyhow since I tend to use old school forged non insert putters---- In the summer though I will be playing one of the Pro Vs or a Snell or a Vice depends on what I can get my hands on. 

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I'm guessing at least a dozen.  I'm still not firmly in the one ball fits me best camp - my data does not support it.  Numerous times I've grabbed a less than tour level ball after having lost a ProV1 and never noticed a difference.  I've played lots of the better known balls for years and simply have not noticed an appreciable difference.  Hell, I had one of my best rounds last summer using 2 piece balls during the "Hardrock" contest.  

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34 minutes ago, fixyurdivot said:

I'm guessing at least a dozen.  I'm still not firmly in the one ball fits me best camp - my data does not support it.  Numerous times I've grabbed a less than tour level ball after having lost a ProV1 and never noticed a difference.  I've played lots of the better known balls for years and simply have not noticed an appreciable difference.  Hell, I had one of my best rounds last summer using 2 piece balls during the "Hardrock" contest.  

So your saying you see no difference on how a ball reacts on the green with chips, pitches, shots with scoring irons between a Prov1 and some other type of ball? 

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8 minutes ago, RickyBobby_PR said:

So your saying you see no difference on how a ball reacts on the green with chips, pitches, shots with scoring irons between a Prov1 and some other type of ball? 

Pretty much... at least to the point where it results in lower scoring. Not suggesting that a Nitro or Pinnacle works as well day in and day out, but that the more popular balls do.  

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9 hours ago, fixyurdivot said:

Pretty much... at least to the point where it results in lower scoring. Not suggesting that a Nitro or Pinnacle works as well day in and day out, but that the more popular balls do.  

Those Pinnacle Softs worked well with vintage equipment. Someone gave me a dozen because he bought a bunch when they discontinued them. But that is the only time I played them. I think I have a couple left in the shag bag or over in my net basket

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4 hours ago, BIG STU said:

Those Pinnacle Softs worked well with vintage equipment. Someone gave me a dozen because he bought a bunch when they discontinued them. But that is the only time I played them. I think I have a couple left in the shag bag or over in my net basket

In my younger playing days there was a popular rumor that Pinnacles would shorten the lifespan of persimmon woods - damaging the inserts..  The only time I play the old two piece balls is during the Carpal Tunnel Challenge.

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23 hours ago, RickyBobby_PR said:

if you take 5 balls you are interested to the course and test them from green to tee you will find the one that works best for your game. Will one perform better for you in short game vs another but not as good with long irons? Possibly. the purpose of each person testing on the course is the one that helps them play their best.

These make up the majority of play balls in my bag at present.  Mixed in are some older TM and Titleist models not on this list. I just used a Vice Pro Plus (the only one I have) for Monday's round and never noticed any difference.  I think for most of us mid handicap players, the difference between balls in these categories is really subtle.  Perhaps for those of you who purposely flight balls down, left and right, or land past the hole and spin back, the difference is more pronounced?   

image.png.66c989ed022a002cfc2678ed6e02be02.png

For those of you who have had ball fittings, what was involved?  It seems like I'd have to spend lots of time hitting each candidate in order to establish a statistically meaningful dataset.  Most of these fittings using LM's is a charge by the hour... could get expensive.

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For those of you who have had ball fittings, what was involved?  It seems like I'd have to spend lots of time hitting each candidate in order to establish a statistically meaningful dataset.  Most of these fittings using LM's is a charge by the hour... could get expensive.


Honestly, I’d take those you’re interested in and go find a green that will allow chipping and pitches.
Find the ball or balls that play best in that arena. From there, narrow it down on the course and find the ball-flight and distance you desire. Technology is a wonderful thing but nothing will ever replace you trusting your gut and truly seeing results with your own eyes during a round.
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I probably have 3 or 4 different balls in my bag at any given time. I'm going on my second season using the Z-Star as my primary. If I happen to lose my personally mandated max of 3 new balls, I change to whatever else is in my bag, which includes a few Z-Stars that were retired for scuffs due to inevitable collisions with unintended targets, a few high quality balls I find and keep (ProV1, TP5, and/or respective x varieties), and I think there are still a couple K-Sigs a friend gave me.

I get the idea that we should find and play one ball, but when I am having "one of those days" where I lose three or more new balls, the consistency of the ball will be of no benefit to my game at that point.

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35 minutes ago, fixyurdivot said:

These make up the majority of play balls in my bag at present.  Mixed in are some older TM and Titleist models not on this list. I just used a Vice Pro Plus (the only one I have) for Monday's round and never noticed any difference.  I think for most of us mid handicap players, the difference between balls in these categories is really subtle.  Perhaps for those of you who purposely flight balls down, left and right, or land past the hole and spin back, the difference is more pronounced?   

image.png.66c989ed022a002cfc2678ed6e02be02.png

For those of you who have had ball fittings, what was involved?  It seems like I'd have to spend lots of time hitting each candidate in order to establish a statistically meaningful dataset.  Most of these fittings using LM's is a charge by the hour... could get expensive.

Depends on where you do the fitting and with who. If you did a bridgestone in person fitting they will have you hit several shots with your driver and current ball. Based on the numbers they will pick a bridgestone ball that should fit you and have you hit several shots again. If not getting optimal numbers or if you may be in between ball type they will have you hit shots with a different ball. They will show you the numbers and how they compare and based on the numbers they will show you what ball performs the best.  I believe titleist and Srixon do the same at their fittings. These are free at demo days or when they schedule ball fitting only days.

I don’t know if Club Champion, tour Spec, etc do ball fittings so I’ll use txg as the sample. They charge $50 for a 45 minute session and will have you hit balls with each part of the bag and with several balls. My guess is based on what they see numbers wise they can narrow down to a couple balls pretty quickly so that you aren’t hitting hundreds of shots trying every possible ball.

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I also think golfers adapt to the ball and conditions they are playing in......its strange to think there is one ball that suits you best because you could play a course that calls for different balls on each shot.....some courses have longer grass in the fairways and do not get any roll out so you would want a ball that flies as far as possible in the air.....but the greens on that course may be like Riviera and be hard as rocks which would lead you to believe you need a ball that spins more on approaches....

Thats why I think a lot of this stuff is pure BS. Mainly because you cannot quantify anything from a scoring perspective. Sure I agree you should probably play the best ball for you distance wise but all the other variables in a round of golf lead me to believe one ball is not the answer. Im not sure how you can maximize efficiency when each hole is different, fairways are inconsistent, green hardness is inconsistent from one hole to the next.....

i think your best scoring comes down to what Pmookie said.....what do you like...that leads to trust......

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7 hours ago, fixyurdivot said:

In my younger playing days there was a popular rumor that Pinnacles would shorten the lifespan of persimmon woods - damaging the inserts..  The only time I play the old two piece balls is during the Carpal Tunnel Challenge.

It was not a rumor it was a fact--- The Surlyn covered balls over time would destroy the pressed paper faces or fiber faces as we called them. The hard plastic faces naaw

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6 hours ago, fixyurdivot said:

These make up the majority of play balls in my bag at present.  Mixed in are some older TM and Titleist models not on this list. I just used a Vice Pro Plus (the only one I have) for Monday's round and never noticed any difference.  I think for most of us mid handicap players, the difference between balls in these categories is really subtle.  Perhaps for those of you who purposely flight balls down, left and right, or land past the hole and spin back, the difference is more pronounced?   

image.png.66c989ed022a002cfc2678ed6e02be02.png

For those of you who have had ball fittings, what was involved?  It seems like I'd have to spend lots of time hitting each candidate in order to establish a statistically meaningful dataset.  Most of these fittings using LM's is a charge by the hour... could get expensive.

Everyone is different that is why there are so many different balls to choose from. On the test you posted and this is strictly me I would rate the Vice and Snell balls on the top line along with the Pro V.  The On Core balls I did not like I got a sample pack from a friend of mine and they felt hard and rock like to me off both the Driver and Irons never got to the short game part. Same for me with the Volvik balls. The Cut balls I have never hit. Believe it or not the first Kirkland balls that MGS tested I would rate up there on the top too. You could not find them here or in Charlotte. A gracious friend on WRX from Florida sent me 3. I loved those balls. I think if you look back on the Kirkland thread here I questioned if they were conforming or not because I was about 5 to 7 yards further on the Driver and Irons with them and could spin the crap out of them. I also want to correct myself here. Earlier I said I do not like Bridgestone balls actually in the past there were 2 I liked the old U-Tri Tour and the Treo Soft. I also like the Blue Colored Lady Bridgestone for vintage play

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5 hours ago, Tsecor said:

I also think golfers adapt to the ball and conditions they are playing in......its strange to think there is one ball that suits you best because you could play a course that calls for different balls on each shot.....some courses have longer grass in the fairways and do not get any roll out so you would want a ball that flies as far as possible in the air.....but the greens on that course may be like Riviera and be hard as rocks which would lead you to believe you need a ball that spins more on approaches....

Thats why I think a lot of this stuff is pure BS. Mainly because you cannot quantify anything from a scoring perspective. Sure I agree you should probably play the best ball for you distance wise but all the other variables in a round of golf lead me to believe one ball is not the answer. Im not sure how you can maximize efficiency when each hole is different, fairways are inconsistent, green hardness is inconsistent from one hole to the next.....

i think your best scoring comes down to what Pmookie said.....what do you like...that leads to trust......

Yes, you are correct, there is no ball that is perfect for all conditions that one light encounter on a course during the round of golf. Unfortunately the rules of golf don’t allow you to change balls from one shot to the next. That’s why you have to choose for yourself. You have to find a ball that gives you what you want. Anyone can adapt to any golf ball and score just as well with it. I think the majority like to find a ball and stick with it for a while because it helps them eliminate a variable in he process. If you lay the same ball, you can have expectations of what the ball will do instead of changing balls all the time and not having any idea how it will react. Even on the tour balls Callaway, titleist, Bridgestone, taylormade will be slightly different for each individual. Most Guys pick one from the favorite manufacturer and go with it, then there is no guessing on what the  all will do. specifically around the green.  

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I just checked my bag and in my play these pocket I have an unused sleeve of the original Kirklands, a sleeve of Srixon Z-Stars, some prov1/v1x,  a couple of AVX, a bridgestone tour B x, a few varieties of Snell, and a few TP5s.     In my practice ball pocket I have a couple of Pro V1s and Chromesofts. 

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I think picking one ball that fits you and staying with it every round benefits you more than choosing one set of clubs and sticking with them! 

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Right now I've got some QST, Duo Soft, and Top Flite D2 Feels. All on the "lower compression" side and one with a urethane cover. I prefer the QST but I'll use the Duos & D2s earlier in the season (or later) when it's colder and my swing isn't entirely there yet after a long winter layoff. 

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