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Shankster

WGC Mexico

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Thank you for this.  Even before I worked at a course I didn't find these funny. 
Now that I've seen for 5 years how hard our Super and his crew work to provide the best conditions they can for play.   Well I don't want to say what I truly think about these videos.  I might violate a moral code or two


Same here. Nothing good comes of those videos.
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10 hours ago, Shankster said:

Much like the dudes on Instagram jumping a cart over a sand trap... that is better off deleted from anyone’s news feed.

Ironically, many of the same "mashed potatoes" yelling jack-wagons posting videos of jumping carts are the same guys on "Woke Twitter" vehemently pissed off at Bryson and Reed!

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12 minutes ago, Middler said:

That’s not what I said. Keeping pace is the exception for DeChambeau, he’s more often playing slow according to numerous sources for years. In your work, your appraisal is based on your most common performance as it should be, not the good exceptions. If your “worst aspects” are the norm, that’s what you should expect to be “judged for.”  I’m looking forward to the day the PGA follows the Euro tour and does something with Holmes, DeChambeau and the other chronic slow players - on behalf of all the other players they force to wait.

As I acknowledged earlier, I’m not a fan of DeChambeau and don’t care for his approach to the game. I watched him  (in person) throw a very childish temper tantrum and then take it out on his caddy at a tournament - I’ve never respected him since that moment.

Don’t hold your breath waiting. The changes coming to the pga tour aren’t going to deter it much. It may make some players change up a little bit but these guys have been accustomed to playing a certain way and like the saying goes “the tiger can’t change his stripes”

With the changes being to time a person and not a group that may be what gets some of these guys to speed up a bit but the rule still seems to have leeway in it that gives the pga tour an out for not fining someone.

The difference between the pga tour and euro tour is popularity. The tv money drives what the tours do and with 4-5 hours of tv time for most events the tour can get tee times setup so that the last group finishes around the end of coverage to allow slow play to not affect the tv time. 

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16 hours ago, revkev said:

I knew that Reed's win would bring additional discussion - I'm worn out by the cheating stuff that is plaguing my two favorite sports but I do have an observation or question as to everyone else's opinion.  Do you think that JT made a big deal about his drop and the ball moving because he was playing with Reed?  It was after all a no brainer that there was no penalty involved according to rules that are now over a year old and well vetted - Just something that I thought about as I was watching. 

My perspective on JT's delay to get a rules official is that he was playing CYA with the drop.  He saw the ball move, and wanted to have someone just check with him to make sure he was ok.  How many situations have we seen where said player goes about their business on something like that, only to end up in the scoring trailer at the end of the round with that situation playing on an endless loop for them and then they are assessed a 2 stroke penalty after the fact because a TV camera with a telephoto slo-mo lens saw the ball move a fraction of a centimeter only visible to the player and that camera lens.  I don't blame JT for being proactive in this case and getting a rules official to give him a ruling either way.  But yeah, the rest of us on the course don't need to go through that, because we know what we saw and what the ruling is, but we don't have to worry about TV cameras and the entire world then reacting to the TV and making much ado about nothing.

Edited by Mr. 82
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42 minutes ago, Middler said:

That’s not what I said. Keeping pace is the exception for DeChambeau, he’s more often playing slow according to numerous sources for years. In your work, your appraisal is based on your most common performance as it should be, not the good exceptions. If your “worst aspects” are the norm, that’s what you should expect to be “judged for.”  I’m looking forward to the day the PGA follows the Euro tour and does something with Holmes, DeChambeau and the other chronic slow players - on behalf of all the other players they force to wait.

As I acknowledged earlier, I’m not a fan of DeChambeau and don’t care for his approach to the game. I watched him  (in person) throw a very childish temper tantrum and then take it out on his caddy at a tournament - I’ve never respected him since that moment.

For the record, I don't particularly care for Bryson either.  What I can do, is give credit where it is due.  After being placed on the clock on Saturday, he sped up significantly Sunday and played better golf in the process.  If we're quick to condemn for negative behavior, we should be equally as quick to praise when noticeable change occurs.  Maybe he goes back to old patterns, maybe this is the beginning of permanent change.  Either way, he deserves some credit for Sunday just as much as he deserves contempt for Saturday.

As for the "employment" analogy, Bryson is an independent contractor.  The PGA Tour is a member owned, member run organization.  If the Tour wanted a change in certain behavior, the impetus is squarely on the players to effect such change!

To use an analogy of my own.  Should the police officer you drove past this morning give you a ticket for speeding last Wednesday?  Does speeding last Wednesday equate to habitual behavior you are incapable of correcting?  When corrective behavior does occur and you change your driving habits, should you still be stalked by the police department?  Food for thought!

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48 minutes ago, Middler said:

^^^ We simply disagree, no biggie. When DeChambeau starts keeping up regularly, I’ll be happy to acknowledge. Not one example just after he’s been disciplined.

What about the tournaments where he was never put on the clock? Do those not count because the announcers didn’t talk about it?

I’m betting the number of times he’s been out on the clock is relatively low compared to the number of rounds played 

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1 minute ago, Middler said:

If you choose to overlook...

  • all the times he has been put on the clock (something officials are loathe to do, and most players have never been put on the clock)
  • all the tournaments where commentators and analysts have shown examples
  • and the fellow touring pros who have stepped up and called out DeChambeau for taking far too long

...and give him the benefit of the doubt with no data, thats your choice. I don’t discount they’re views in favor of an unsubstantiated POV. 

He has over 400 rounds played since turning pro. Of that how many times has he been put on the clock and of that how many times has he been put on the clock more than once in a round?

I’m not saying he isn’t slow, or slower than most pros on tour but there are defined rules for when a player is put on the clock and subsequently penalized. I would bet the number of rounds he’s been placed on the clock would be under 10%. Is that a problem? for those looking to bash him about being slow more than likely. 
 

The rules are there and even guys that aren’t known for slow play occasionally get put on the clock. 

 

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