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pozzit

Issue pulling shaft

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8 hours ago, pozzit said:

I think this was part of the problem I had when I used the head gun I think I may have missed some spots or it was cooking too quickly as I was heating another area.

Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk
 

Yeah, happen to me still when I try to save the ferrule, often the spot on top of the hosel next to the ferrule position needs patience.  Even after I warm up the ferrule and pushed it up slightly and wrap it with moisture, still difficult to give it enough heat to soften the epoxy.  Cut off the ferrule to expose the top of the hosel will be the easiest way.  

Also remembered at one time there was a batch of shafting epoxy with higher break down point.  Maybe 10-12 years ago, there was a batch everyone was using which needed more heating time to breakdown the epoxy.  Anyway. you did the right thing, heating the hosel up and give it a little time for the heat to expand into the interior of the hosel , reheat let rest a minute and repeat several times to break down the tough epoxy.

A two step process for my own use is to heat up the hosel with propane heater then a mini torch for the bottom and the top of the hosel, when the epoxy broken down, quickly reheat the whole hosel ( adapter ) with propane torch then proceed to extract the shaft.

I still like to use extractor for steel shafts, done it with leather gloves and twisting out the shaft by hands but, learned that some shaft with softer tips will deform slightly when using this method when not pulling the shaft out in a linear line.  Which is hard to do with free hands.  If anyone wonders why the tip of the steel shaft is bent slightly, this might be one of the possible cause.

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2 hours ago, release said:

Yeah, happen to me still when I try to save the ferrule, often the spot on top of the hosel next to the ferrule position needs patience.  Even after I warm up the ferrule and pushed it up slightly and wrap it with moisture, still difficult to give it enough heat to soften the epoxy.  Cut off the ferrule to expose the top of the hosel will be the easiest way.  

Also remembered at one time there was a batch of shafting epoxy with higher break down point.  Maybe 10-12 years ago, there was a batch everyone was using which needed more heating time to breakdown the epoxy.  Anyway. you did the right thing, heating the hosel up and give it a little time for the heat to expand into the interior of the hosel , reheat let rest a minute and repeat several times to break down the tough epoxy.

A two step process for my own use is to heat up the hosel with propane heater then a mini torch for the bottom and the top of the hosel, when the epoxy broken down, quickly reheat the whole hosel ( adapter ) with propane torch then proceed to extract the shaft.

I still like to use extractor for steel shafts, done it with leather gloves and twisting out the shaft by hands but, learned that some shaft with softer tips will deform slightly when using this method when not pulling the shaft out in a linear line.  Which is hard to do with free hands.  If anyone wonders why the tip of the steel shaft is bent slightly, this might be one of the possible cause.

That's interesting about the batch of epoxy being harder to break down.   I never thought of that.

And I have suffered with the bent shaft tip issue, but I always thought it was from hitting balls off of hard range mats.  

I usually skipped using the shaft puller on steel shaft pulls out of convenience, but not anymore.

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Posted (edited)
13 hours ago, SlowNLow said:

That's interesting about the batch of epoxy being harder to break down.   I never thought of that.

And I have suffered with the bent shaft tip issue, but I always thought it was from hitting balls off of hard range mats.  

I usually skipped using the shaft puller on steel shaft pulls out of convenience, but not anymore.

Yes, the steel shaft would bent right at the hosel top if pounding thousands of range balls off the matt+cement floor.  I had a set of Ben Hogan from the 70's through the 80's pounding hundreds of range ball a day through many Winter says and that set had a slight bent right where the tip meets the hosel end.   Noticed the slightly bent tips when I pulled the shaft 3 decades later.  If you notice the bent angle are all uniformed to one direction and more pronounced in the short irons.... then most likely it was caused by hitting range balls off a hard surface.

I was just suggesting that it could be one of the cause of a bent shaft tip since when the metal is heated up would be more pliable to the twisting and angled contact when extracting with hands.   Nothing wrong with using hands to extract the steel shaft.  Just that I , myself could not get a linear pull of the shaft.  I assume if you secure the head in a vice, you can extract the steel shaft by pulling it out in a straight line.

Also, I had been dealing with a lot of the modern steel shafts, Not sure if the thin wall construction to save weight or maybe the softer metal material composite to gain more feel had anything to do with more bent shaft tips these days.   Ben Hogan iron set used one of the earliest light weight shaft in the days and that could have something to do with the bent shaft tips.

 

Edited by release

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5 hours ago, release said:

Yes, the steel shaft would bent right at the hosel top if pounding thousands of range balls off the matt+cement floor.  I had a set of Ben Hogan from the 70's through the 80's pounding hundreds of range ball a day through many Winter says and that set had a slight bent right where the tip meets the hosel end.   Noticed the slightly bent tips when I pulled the shaft 3 decades later.  If you notice the bent angle are all uniformed to one direction and more pronounced in the short irons.... then most likely it was caused by hitting range balls off a hard surface.

I was just suggesting that it could be one of the cause of a bent shaft tip since when the metal is heated up would be more pliable to the twisting and angled contact when extracting with hands.   Nothing wrong with using hands to extract the steel shaft.  Just that I , myself could not get a linear pull of the shaft.  I assume if you secure the head in a vice, you can extract the steel shaft by pulling it out in a straight line.

Also, I had been dealing with a lot of the modern steel shafts, Not sure if the thin wall construction to save weight or maybe the softer metal material composite to gain more feel had anything to do with more bent shaft tips these days.   Ben Hogan iron set used one of the earliest light weight shaft in the days and that could have something to do with the bent shaft tips.

 

Ah, and a symptom of this bending of shaft tip is the dreaded "ferrule creep"?

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3 hours ago, SlowNLow said:

Ah, and a symptom of this bending of shaft tip is the dreaded "ferrule creep"?

 Very possibly, especially if not enough epoxy was applied when slipped on the ferrule.

  There is no way the ferrule can be flush with the hosel if the shaft is bent.

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If too much epoxy is used it can be very difficult to quickly pull a head. Anyone looking to build or work on clubs has to get a shaft puller. I have a hydraulic puller and its been used weekly for the past 15 years.
I don't buy the strong batch of epoxy line. More than likely its too much epoxy use. JPEG_20200512_084730_457843647345070440.jpg

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using the butane torch about 20 sec on three sides.

Give it s a few seconds and repeat then try to twist off.

sometimes the taper tips can be logged in the hosel. Makes for a secure fit but a real pain to remove.

if they are 370s. and you glues the ferrule in also and have not moved it first it could be an anchor to removing the head.


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On 5/12/2020 at 8:49 AM, Popeye64 said:

If too much epoxy is used it can be very difficult to quickly pull a head. Anyone looking to build or work on clubs has to get a shaft puller. I have a hydraulic puller and its been used weekly for the past 15 years.
I don't buy the strong batch of epoxy line. More than likely its too much epoxy use. JPEG_20200512_084730_457843647345070440.jpg

Sent from my SM-G981U using Tapatalk
 

Completely agree.  I purchased this one several years back.  I was balking at spending $100 for a long time.  After I got it I wished that I had done it years earlier.  The one below is a newer model than I have, but same seller. 

https://www.ebay.com/itm/GOLF-CLUB-SHAFT-PULLER-EXTRACTOR-FOR-STEEL-GRAPHITE-SHAFTS/164138371857?hash=item263768cb11:g:11wAAOSwZdZdQ6~m

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Posted (edited)

I use a cheap creme brulee butane torch. 10s heat in the middle of the hosel, then rotate 120° and give it another 10s, then rotate 120° again and a final 10. Don't move the flame or rotate while applying heat, you need to put the heat into the metal not evenly heat the metal's surface. After 30s it should twist right off.

If you're ever in a pinch and don't care about lighting a ferrule cap on fire or dripping molten burning plastic onto other flammable substances you can do the same procedure on a gas burner oven. When I was first starting that's how I did it. When the hosel was hot I'd wrap it in a towel, step on the head, then twist the shaft out. That works great too, just be careful not to overdo it with the heat or, you know, burn your house down... 

Edited by Grit Golf

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