Jump to content

Adjusting my own sand wedge lie angle?


Recommended Posts

Hey all, a while back I accidentally broke the shaft on my sand wedge. I hit a really bad pitch and without looking tossed my club away, not angry, just exasperation. Had I been paying attention, I would have noticed the tree that the shaft bent around. Anyway, the friend I was with had an older Taylormade sand wedge in his bag that he just gave me. Lucky me! And a pretty amazing friend.

While it works fine close to the green, if I try to do anything more than a half swing, the lie angle is all off at address. The heel touches the ground and from my perspective the toe looks like it is sticking straight up into the air. I would love to adjust the lie angle, but the golf money I spend is either on clubs or on actually playing (not really both). I'm pretty handy; I do wood work and a bit of metal work, so I feel like if there is a good way to do this I could probably get it done. Does anyone have a more-or-less fool proof way of doing this? Thanks!

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not sure how you would get it even close without a Loft/lie machine. You can take it to Dicks or Roger Dunns or similar and they will adjust for you. Probably around $10. 

  • Like 3

:taylormade-small:             SIM 9.5* (GD XC 6X) 

:taylormade-small:             SIM 15* (GD DI 7X) 

:taylormade-small:             3 DHY (GD DI HY8X)

:srixon-small:                    ZX7 4-PW (KBS C Taper S)

:titelist-small:                     Vokey SM8 49 08 F ( KBS 610)

:titelist-small:                     Vokey SM8 55 08 M (KBS 610)

:titelist-small:                     Vokey SM8 59 04 L  (KBS 610)

:scotty-cameron-1:                Special Select SquareBack 2 33"

:titelist-small:                     ProV1

Twitter                     @THEZIPR23

 

"One thing Golf has taught me, is that my muscles have no memory."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Agree with post above. Take it and get the loft/lie angle measured as is.

I would suggest next to have the wedge bent flat a degree or two and test it. Ideally it would be good to take it to a golf course/driving range that has a person that can check/alter clubs (i.e. has loft/lie angle machine). 

Also here is good source for checking lie angles of your clubs with a sharpie/ink test:

"The ink line on the back of the ball technique for dynamic lie fitting is simple and logical. A heavy ink line is drawn on the ball with a Sharpie pen. The ball is placed on the ground with the line vertical and facing the clubhead. After impact, a faint image of the ink line is transferred to the clubface. If the line is perfectly vertical on the clubface, the lie of the club is correct for the golfer. If the ink line tilts in an angle up toward the toe side of the face, the lie of the club that was hit is too upright so the correct lie has to be flatter than the lie of the club being hit. Vice versa — if the ink line angles up toward the heel side of the face, the correct lie has to be more upright than the lie of the test club." (source: https://bobsailergolf.blogspot.com/2015/02/wishon-best-way-to-fit-lie-angle.html )

Good luck

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 6/17/2020 at 4:30 PM, aerospace_ray said:

Agree with post above. Take it and get the loft/lie angle measured as is.

I would suggest next to have the wedge bent flat a degree or two and test it. Ideally it would be good to take it to a golf course/driving range that has a person that can check/alter clubs (i.e. has loft/lie angle machine). 

Also here is good source for checking lie angles of your clubs with a sharpie/ink test:

"The ink line on the back of the ball technique for dynamic lie fitting is simple and logical. A heavy ink line is drawn on the ball with a Sharpie pen. The ball is placed on the ground with the line vertical and facing the clubhead. After impact, a faint image of the ink line is transferred to the clubface. If the line is perfectly vertical on the clubface, the lie of the club is correct for the golfer. If the ink line tilts in an angle up toward the toe side of the face, the lie of the club that was hit is too upright so the correct lie has to be flatter than the lie of the club being hit. Vice versa — if the ink line angles up toward the heel side of the face, the correct lie has to be more upright than the lie of the test club." (source: https://bobsailergolf.blogspot.com/2015/02/wishon-best-way-to-fit-lie-angle.html )

Good luck

That's a great idea, thanks!

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...