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The Real Reason Pros Play Blades


Hamachi Style
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On 1/9/2021 at 11:57 AM, Hamachi Style said:

So... pretty much every 'justification or explanation' of the benefits of blade style irons I've seen/heard/read seems to refer back to the same old boiler plate: Workability.

 

No doubt workability is part of the equation, but I'm not convinced it's the whole story, or even the main reason.

In my personal experience with different styles of irons, the main difference I've noticed is this. Bigger, game improvement or super game improvement style irons do have a longer maximum distance. But to achieve that maximum distance, it must be hit properly (square, flush..) The 'forgiveness' people talk about is the distance on mishits. But those two numbers are always going to be different, depending on the nature and severity of the mishit. And I'd say that even minor mishits clearly do not go the maximum distance of those flush hits. This is a known fact for those of us who play game improvement irons.

 

This is true with all clubs of course, but during my testing of blades (I'm not good enough to game them, yet, but I have some old Nike VR's and Mizunos that are fun to practice with) blades have a more reliable total distance. In other words, when you catch one nice and square, it's not going to take off like a rocket.

 

 

So everyone says the reason pros play blades is workability, but I think it might be more distance control. When you factor in front to back as well as side to side in dispersion and accuracy assessments, it does seem like blades are more accurate. Otherwise, pros would play game improvement irons. Sure there would be a little bit of pride at stake, but if they were really better, and once someone was clearly using them to get a competitive advantage, the field would soon follow.

 

Thoughts?

It's not especially appreciated by some, but Terry Koehler's blog post quite a few years ago typifies what I think is a primary reason to use them.  He recounted robot testing of blades vs various CBs, which showed a considerably smaller dispersion area on good hits for blades than the area that resulted on similar contact with the CBs tested.

Personally speaking, it's something I found especially true for one of my sets of Ram Tour Grinds, in a session where I was trying to buy something else at 2nd Swing.  LOL

Ironically, I don't try working the ball all that often...

Edited by NRJyzr

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3w:  Cobra King LTD, RIP Beta 90, 42"
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Irons:  3-PW Mizuno MP37, Recoil Proto 125 F4 (reshaft in progress, slowly); 1i & 3-PW Golden Ram TW276, NV105 S; TBD iron set, RIP Tour 115 R
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Putter:  Mizuno TPM-2, 34"
Ball:  Wilson Staff Duo Professional, TM TP5, Kirkland Signature 3pc v2

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Pros play blades or forged CB's for distance control and work-ability as the OP noted. However, they also play them for superior feel, not noted in this thread so far? They don't need more distance, higher launch/spin or much forgiveness.

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On 1/9/2021 at 12:57 PM, Hamachi Style said:

So... pretty much every 'justification or explanation' of the benefits of blade style irons I've seen/heard/read seems to refer back to the same old boiler plate: Workability.

 

No doubt workability is part of the equation, but I'm not convinced it's the whole story, or even the main reason.

In my personal experience with different styles of irons, the main difference I've noticed is this. Bigger, game improvement or super game improvement style irons do have a longer maximum distance. But to achieve that maximum distance, it must be hit properly (square, flush..) The 'forgiveness' people talk about is the distance on mishits. But those two numbers are always going to be different, depending on the nature and severity of the mishit. And I'd say that even minor mishits clearly do not go the maximum distance of those flush hits. This is a known fact for those of us who play game improvement irons.

 

This is true with all clubs of course, but during my testing of blades (I'm not good enough to game them, yet, but I have some old Nike VR's and Mizunos that are fun to practice with) blades have a more reliable total distance. In other words, when you catch one nice and square, it's not going to take off like a rocket.

 

 

So everyone says the reason pros play blades is workability, but I think it might be more distance control. When you factor in front to back as well as side to side in dispersion and accuracy assessments, it does seem like blades are more accurate. Otherwise, pros would play game improvement irons. Sure there would be a little bit of pride at stake, but if they were really better, and once someone was clearly using them to get a competitive advantage, the field would soon follow.

 

Thoughts?

Id say its really more feel, distance control and consistency than it is workability.  With blades, the distance is more consistent and you instantly know whether you hit it solidly or not.

I go back and forth between blades and CBs and I find that when I practice and play enough to hit the blades well, they are a much more consistent club.  I still find with CBs that I sometimes will have a weird shot where I hit the ball way farther than I should.  Its actually something that I really struggled with when I tested the Tommy Armour Atomic irons and eventually caused me to turn away from them.

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Whats in my Sun Mountain 2.5+ stand bag?

Woods: Tommy Armour Atomic 10.5* 

Hybrid: Mizuno MP Fli-Hi 3H

Irons: Mizuno T-Zoid True 5, 7 and 9-irons

Wedge: Mizuno S18 blue ion 54*

Putter: Mizuno Bettinardi A-02

Ball: Maxfli Tour X

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On 1/12/2021 at 3:27 PM, NRJyzr said:

It's not especially appreciated by some, but Terry Koehler's blog post quite a few years ago typifies what I think is a primary reason to use them.  He recounted robot testing of blades vs various CBs, which showed a considerably smaller dispersion area on good hits for blades than the area that resulted on similar contact with the CBs tested.

Personally speaking, it's something I found especially true for one of my sets of Ram Tour Grinds, in a session where I was trying to buy something else at 2nd Swing.  LOL

Ironically, I don't try working the ball all that often...

This is exactly what I was trying to say. Smaller dispersion area on good hits with blades. And I guess I just made the leap that 'good hit' equals 'straight', so then mostly looking at distance control.

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  • 1 month later...

First MGS post:

Not a pro by any means here and its difficult to speak for them unless you here their opinion directly. I play between a 1 and 4 hdcp, currently a 1.7.

I have played blades or tiny cb's my whole life. Another poster eluded to the age of current pros and what was available to them growing up. I think there is absolutely something to that statement.

I am 35 now and started playing at 9 with a set of cut down northwestern blades and was upgraded to a set of ben hogan blades in my early teen years then to Cleveland ta-3's from 2000 to 2017. I have experimented with various irons since then with AP2's as the chunkiest of all of them and finally sticking with the MP18mb's. 

There is NO REPLACEMENT for learning to strike the ball well and the feedback a blade will give you when you don't. My dad taught me how to detect strike location on the club face with drills by predicting the flight path and carry distance w/o looking at the ball in the air.

For me, its a lot of things, not just distance dispersion. The feel off the face, how the sole gets through the turf, launch window consistency, top line look, minimal offset, weaker lofts, blade length, consistent gapping, and workability. All of these features deserve a topic of their own. 

I have hit GI and super GI irons and a 28* 200 yd 7i does me no good.

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How many LPGA players play blades? Most am men's swing speeds and distances will compare better to the pro woman's game. I don't know the answer but I bet it's almost none. Over the years I have tried playing with a Miura blade and then "players cavities" like AP2 etc. I found that a GI club like the regular Cally Apex is a good mix for me.

Back to the original topic, the PGA pros probably play blades to be able to hit irons in specific windows and spin control out of various lies. The limitation of my Apex clubs is flighting it down, they just want to go in the air. Also, I think "jumpers" happen as spin is taken off out of the rough or mishits on GI clubs. Mishits on GI clubs can feel flush but they aren't and then they go over the green and we think they have a hotspot. The pros want that feedback of the missed shot and don't need the help that most of us need.

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6 hours ago, bens197 said:

I don’t think most truly understand how good Professional Golfers are at their craft. 
 

If you’ve ever played with a CC scratch golfer, we could all agree they’re good. 
 

Now, take that golfer and knock off 4-6 shots from that scratch handicap. 
 

Now, consider they’re playing courses with 13-14 stimp greens at 7,300 yards at their peak condition. 
 

Professionals play blades because they expect to hit the center of the face every single time. 

No pro expects to hit the center of the face every time.  They all mishit it.  They play blades because the distances are more consistent and because they want to flight the ball down.

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"I suppose its better to be a master of 7 than to be vaguely familiar with 14." - Chick Evans

Whats in my Sun Mountain 2.5+ stand bag?

Woods: Tommy Armour Atomic 10.5* 

Hybrid: Mizuno MP Fli-Hi 3H

Irons: Mizuno T-Zoid True 5, 7 and 9-irons

Wedge: Mizuno S18 blue ion 54*

Putter: Mizuno Bettinardi A-02

Ball: Maxfli Tour X

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  • 2 weeks later...

I buy and sell and constantly rotate equipment in and out of my bag.

I think the lines between players clubs and super game improvement are getting more blurred by mfgs making so many variations of same clubs.

For instance. 

Mizuno jpx-919

Tour is a a forged iron, minimal offset small head, designed for tour players. 

 

Forged, slightly larger head, a little more offset designed for low handicappers with pretty consistent ball striking. Still very workable club for both distance and shot shaping. (I play these irons)

 

Hot metal pro, now this is interesting. It is a cast head with all the tech of the hot metals gi irons, but head similar to forged and offset of tour.  So these are supposed to be just as forgiving as hot metals, but with smaller head and less offset will they be workable?

I will find out soon enough, as I just picked up a set to test. 

After reading through these posts, I find one theme that I am not necessarily buying. 

I do not believe the hotter face of gi irons are the reason behind the rocket shot that blasts 20-30 yards long, but rather a poor strike, yes you crushed it. But you did not hit it where you want it, you did not hit it correctly.  I think the reason better players do kot.play gi irons is because they are more dificult to shape your shot. The larger head, with more offset and chunkier soles make it more difficult to shape the shot the way you can with a forged iron. 

So I play the jpx-919 forged.  They are significantly smaller and have smaller sole and offset then the gi irons. 

I hit my 7i just about 165, with forged and 170 with hotmetals.  

I was playing a 160 yard up hill approach the other day, it was cold and I was tired.  My approach was supposed to be a mid High fade to front of green.  Well I absolutely crushed it, I hit what looked like a pure golf shot, nice and high,  too high to be honest right over pin, over green, over tee box behind. I hit the damn thing almost 200 yards.  So it was not a hot face or a club issue it was a swing issues.

 

With a good swing I can hit it high , low,  long or short, I can hit a fade and a draw. I can hit a line drive, or u can hit a balloon.  I can still do those things qith a gi iron, just not as reliable.  So 

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I think another reason (sorry if it's been said and I missed it) is that blades actually spin more that cavity backs. The CG gives lower launch but higher spin. Tiger is documented saying he likes his stock shot spinning high as its easier to take spin off than add more. I often think this is actually what is meant by workability, controlling launch characteristics rather than left/right curvature.

Of course you have the other reasons such as appearance (Ricky and the Rev33) and turf interaction from a thinner sole too.

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Been following this thread for awhile and would like to offer some comments. I do agree with some previous posts or the intent what the poster was stating and I respectfully disagree with some statements regarding center of gravity but will speak to that in a separate future post. Having a background with club fitting, club making I think there is some confusion regarding center of gravity and what that truly is.

The comments below are in reference to why/why not professionals use blades. **Disclaimer I define a blade as a muscle back style small club head. I do not define a small forged semi cavity back style a true blade -- some people do and I get that. I just want everyone to understand my descriptions below and possibly better understand what I am attempting to articulate. I welcome feedback/discussion. This is a great subject to discuss. 

Regarding professionals. Well my best advice is sign up and volunteer at a PGA/Champions Tour event and work the driving range. I have volunteered over 10 years for Champions Tour, a Women's US Open at Shoal Creek, and get to see what the professionals hit. I can tell you there is a mixed bag for most but some still game traditional muscle back blades and imo it might be based on the golfers age or era they came up in. 

(These comments are about irons and regarding professional not amateurs)

Several of the LPGA players had true smaller muscle back blades. The commonalities among the LPGA's that I saw with small true muscle back irons were most were tall (i.e. appeared to be taller than me / 5'8) and I am sure they have +100 mph swing speed. But like the Champion Tour players I have seen, all the LPGA's had latest greatest hybrids, fairway woods and drivers. Absolutely enjoyed watching them tee off and practice on range. 

Most of the younger Champions Tour players I have seen have more modern forged cavity backs. Most of the older Champions Tour players I have seen had mixed bag of irons with some small forged cavity backs combined with true muscle back blades. All of them have the best fluid motion with every club they swing. It is mesmerizing watching them hit balls on the range. I have never seen a bad bad shot. They each have a rhythm, tempo and ball flight that is picture perfect regarding consistency swing to swing. They hit straight, move the ball left to right, etc, etc at will.

 I have watched Tom Watson and Bernhard Langer hit lasers with true muscle back blades and its a thing of beauty. Right beside them I have witnessed golfers ten years younger than them with more of a modern APEX style (reference model) forged cavity back like iron but same thing, picture perfect ball striking. I really believe the iron of choice is a lot about what you learned the game with possibly and influences from the era you started in. I will admit all the professionals I have seen up close and in person have the latest and greatest hybrid, fairway woods and drivers. But irons, I can almost predict based on their age/era they learned the game if they game a true muscle back forged style vs a semi blade -- forged albeit smaller cavity back (i.e. Callaway APEX).  

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14 hours ago, aerospace_ray said:

Been following this thread for awhile and would like to offer some comments. I do agree with some previous posts or the intent what the poster was stating and I respectfully disagree with some statements regarding center of gravity but will speak to that in a separate future post. Having a background with club fitting, club making I think there is some confusion regarding center of gravity and what that truly is.

The comments below are in reference to why/why not professionals use blades. **Disclaimer I define a blade as a muscle back style small club head. I do not define a small forged semi cavity back style a true blade -- some people do and I get that. I just want everyone to understand my descriptions below and possibly better understand what I am attempting to articulate. I welcome feedback/discussion. This is a great subject to discuss. 

Regarding professionals. Well my best advice is sign up and volunteer at a PGA/Champions Tour event and work the driving range. I have volunteered over 10 years for Champions Tour, a Women's US Open at Shoal Creek, and get to see what the professionals hit. I can tell you there is a mixed bag for most but some still game traditional muscle back blades and imo it might be based on the golfers age or era they came up in. 

(These comments are about irons and regarding professional not amateurs)

Several of the LPGA players had true smaller muscle back blades. The commonalities among the LPGA's that I saw with small true muscle back irons were most were tall (i.e. appeared to be taller than me / 5'8) and I am sure they have +100 mph swing speed. But like the Champion Tour players I have seen, all the LPGA's had latest greatest hybrids, fairway woods and drivers. Absolutely enjoyed watching them tee off and practice on range. 

Most of the younger Champions Tour players I have seen have more modern forged cavity backs. Most of the older Champions Tour players I have seen had mixed bag of irons with some small forged cavity backs combined with true muscle back blades. All of them have the best fluid motion with every club they swing. It is mesmerizing watching them hit balls on the range. I have never seen a bad bad shot. They each have a rhythm, tempo and ball flight that is picture perfect regarding consistency swing to swing. They hit straight, move the ball left to right, etc, etc at will.

 I have watched Tom Watson and Bernhard Langer hit lasers with true muscle back blades and its a thing of beauty. Right beside them I have witnessed golfers ten years younger than them with more of a modern APEX style (reference model) forged cavity back like iron but same thing, picture perfect ball striking. I really believe the iron of choice is a lot about what you learned the game with possibly and influences from the era you started in. I will admit all the professionals I have seen up close and in person have the latest and greatest hybrid, fairway woods and drivers. But irons, I can almost predict based on their age/era they learned the game if they game a true muscle back forged style vs a semi blade -- forged albeit smaller cavity back (i.e. Callaway APEX).  

I agree with your sentiment. The thing I think many people miss when discussing blades vs. GI is that every model of every blade and GI iron is different. The mass and dimensional properties of every model of club out there is different so they all play differently. I personally believe playing with smaller profile iron heads is more mental than anything. There also may be a little bit involved with feel as well. I don't think playability has much to do with anything as you can work the ball with any type of iron any direction. If you hit the ball with the face of blade or massive GI iron in the same closed position, both will hook the same amount (assuming loft is the same). The issue I see with some GI irons is that they chase distance which usually means the designs are trying to decrease spin. This is what likely causes your rockets or it could be VFT faces really launching the ball on sub-optimal strikes that have way less spin, causing really long flyers. 

Pros have been trending more towards cavity backs for awhile and I expect that trend to continue. However, I expect pros will continue to play with irons that have little offset, relatively narrow soles, and be solid forgings in the shorter irons. Consistency is the name of the game for them and not many clubs provide that outside of solid forgings (CB or MB). The narrow soles are the only thing I would say makes them more playable but only under the idea that they won't held back on certain lies where wider soles may make it more difficult to go after a certain shot. 

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On 1/9/2021 at 12:57 PM, Hamachi Style said:

So... pretty much every 'justification or explanation' of the benefits of blade style irons I've seen/heard/read seems to refer back to the same old boiler plate: Workability.

 

No doubt workability is part of the equation, but I'm not convinced it's the whole story, or even the main reason.

In my personal experience with different styles of irons, the main difference I've noticed is this. Bigger, game improvement or super game improvement style irons do have a longer maximum distance. But to achieve that maximum distance, it must be hit properly (square, flush..) The 'forgiveness' people talk about is the distance on mishits. But those two numbers are always going to be different, depending on the nature and severity of the mishit. And I'd say that even minor mishits clearly do not go the maximum distance of those flush hits. This is a known fact for those of us who play game improvement irons.

 

This is true with all clubs of course, but during my testing of blades (I'm not good enough to game them, yet, but I have some old Nike VR's and Mizunos that are fun to practice with) blades have a more reliable total distance. In other words, when you catch one nice and square, it's not going to take off like a rocket.

 

 

So everyone says the reason pros play blades is workability, but I think it might be more distance control. When you factor in front to back as well as side to side in dispersion and accuracy assessments, it does seem like blades are more accurate. Otherwise, pros would play game improvement irons. Sure there would be a little bit of pride at stake, but if they were really better, and once someone was clearly using them to get a competitive advantage, the field would soon follow.

 

Thoughts?

"forgiveness" is a marketing term that has brainwashed the entire golf community.  If you have a bad slice or hook, a SGI club is NOT going to do anything for you....if you hit a SGI off the toe, sure it may go a few yards further than a blade but the price you pay trying to hit a wide sole club out of a deep rough will cost you shots minimum.....what does a SGI club do for you in those situations?  The "middle of the road" clubs with "forgiveness" built in, like a nice CB or an Apex pro perhaps gives you the best chance at SCORING better throughout the round.....IMO pros play blades because they know EXACTLY how far each club will go on a well strick shot. If they caught flyers all day with SGI's, they would be shooting in the high 70's every round. 

Golf is cool

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7 hours ago, Tsecor said:

"forgiveness" is a marketing term that has brainwashed the entire golf community.  If you have a bad slice or hook, a SGI club is NOT going to do anything for you....if you hit a SGI off the toe, sure it may go a few yards further than a blade but the price you pay trying to hit a wide sole club out of a deep rough will cost you shots minimum.....what does a SGI club do for you in those situations?  The "middle of the road" clubs with "forgiveness" built in, like a nice CB or an Apex pro perhaps gives you the best chance at SCORING better throughout the round.....IMO pros play blades because they know EXACTLY how far each club will go on a well strick shot. If they caught flyers all day with SGI's, they would be shooting in the high 70's every round. 

I think you are right about SGI clubs to a degree but I wouldn't tell everyone to go buy a set of Apex Pros to start with. Sure, I think the whole idea of forgiveness has been blown out of proportion but at the same time wider soles, offset, and a lower/more rearward COG are all factors that do make it easier to get the ball in the air. Wide soles may cost the occasional stroke on thick lies but for someone who hacks the ground, they will find wide soles to offer tremendous forgiveness and save several strokes all things being equal. Shovels may not be the answer to scoring low but it can put the mind at ease for higher handicap golfers. Heck, it's not unusual to find low handicappers using Big Berthas or Ping G series irons. I think Viktor Hovland uses Ping i210s which are chunky by most standards. SGI irons can shoot just as low as a blade because if you make identical swings with a blade and SGI iron, they will likely have identical results. Shovels with a lower COG are easier to hit with a "solid" feeling and will likely provide a lot more confidence than playing with a set of Titleist MBs. I personally find more compact clubs to be more accurate for me. I don't know if it's because having a more centrally concentrated mass and less offset gives better feel or if it's strictly mental. However, I have rotated a few sets of clubs through the bag that were harder to hit (MP 68 primarily) and they caused me to become a worse ball striker with irons because I lost confidence in my ability to hit a solid shot. MP 68s are great feeling irons and more forgiving by blade standards but the COG is too close to the hosel making it very difficult to hit truly solid shots with anything other than a short iron. 

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13 minutes ago, Kansas King said:

Sure, I think the whole idea of forgiveness has been blown out of proportion but at the same time wider soles, offset, and a lower/more rearward COG are all factors that do make it easier to get the ball in the air.

Not to mention forgiveness means different things to different people.

14 minutes ago, Kansas King said:

Shovels may not be the answer to scoring low but it can put the mind at ease for higher handicap golfers. Heck, it's not unusual to find low handicappers using Big Berthas or Ping G series irons.

I know someone who played the Cleveland launcher irons and regularly shot around par

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14 hours ago, Kansas King said:

I think you are right about SGI clubs to a degree but I wouldn't tell everyone to go buy a set of Apex Pros to start with. Sure, I think the whole idea of forgiveness has been blown out of proportion but at the same time wider soles, offset, and a lower/more rearward COG are all factors that do make it easier to get the ball in the air. Wide soles may cost the occasional stroke on thick lies but for someone who hacks the ground, they will find wide soles to offer tremendous forgiveness and save several strokes all things being equal. Shovels may not be the answer to scoring low but it can put the mind at ease for higher handicap golfers. Heck, it's not unusual to find low handicappers using Big Berthas or Ping G series irons. I think Viktor Hovland uses Ping i210s which are chunky by most standards. SGI irons can shoot just as low as a blade because if you make identical swings with a blade and SGI iron, they will likely have identical results. Shovels with a lower COG are easier to hit with a "solid" feeling and will likely provide a lot more confidence than playing with a set of Titleist MBs. I personally find more compact clubs to be more accurate for me. I don't know if it's because having a more centrally concentrated mass and less offset gives better feel or if it's strictly mental. However, I have rotated a few sets of clubs through the bag that were harder to hit (MP 68 primarily) and they caused me to become a worse ball striker with irons because I lost confidence in my ability to hit a solid shot. MP 68s are great feeling irons and more forgiving by blade standards but the COG is too close to the hosel making it very difficult to hit truly solid shots with anything other than a short iron. 

agreed on most points......and i think were kinda on the same page.....if you can hit a ball relatively straight and keep it out of trouble, a GI or SGI can help flight the ball higher and maybe save a few shots in the course of a round.....but for players who spray it all over the course and have to play out of trouble on most holes, SGI's do nothing to improve scoring. playing out of rough and sand all day with SGI's can really make your score balloon.......im not against SGI's by any means, but for an average golfer who scrambles most of the day and plays from off the fairway a lot, the benefits of an SGI may actually turn into a negative......  

Id love to be Hoviland and look for any edge i could to cut half a stroke or more off my round, but unfortunately 99.9% of golfers are hackers who can barely break 100.  They shouldnt play MB's eaither.....find that nice middle ground with a nice CB of some kind.....like a Titleist T300 possibly. strong lofts and "forgiveness" built in, but still very playable in all situations. 

Golf is cool

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  • 4 weeks later...

 I think I heard Tiger say he likes blades because when he misses it he knows it’s going to come up short. He doesn’t want miss the green pin high left or right he would rather be short. But I think that talks to the larger point about why better players like blades. They know where they are going to go! If they misfit it they know where it’s going to go and if the flush it they know where it’s going. When I have hit game improvement irons or even players distance irons there is the occasional look up and see the ball flying somewhere I didn’t expect it to be going. For better players / pros that is something that is unacceptable. 
 

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On 1/9/2021 at 12:57 PM, Hamachi Style said:

So... pretty much every 'justification or explanation' of the benefits of blade style irons I've seen/heard/read seems to refer back to the same old boiler plate: Workability.

 

No doubt workability is part of the equation, but I'm not convinced it's the whole story, or even the main reason.

In my personal experience with different styles of irons, the main difference I've noticed is this. Bigger, game improvement or super game improvement style irons do have a longer maximum distance. But to achieve that maximum distance, it must be hit properly (square, flush..) The 'forgiveness' people talk about is the distance on mishits. But those two numbers are always going to be different, depending on the nature and severity of the mishit. And I'd say that even minor mishits clearly do not go the maximum distance of those flush hits. This is a known fact for those of us who play game improvement irons.

 

This is true with all clubs of course, but during my testing of blades (I'm not good enough to game them, yet, but I have some old Nike VR's and Mizunos that are fun to practice with) blades have a more reliable total distance. In other words, when you catch one nice and square, it's not going to take off like a rocket.

 

 

So everyone says the reason pros play blades is workability, but I think it might be more distance control. When you factor in front to back as well as side to side in dispersion and accuracy assessments, it does seem like blades are more accurate. Otherwise, pros would play game improvement irons. Sure there would be a little bit of pride at stake, but if they were really better, and once someone was clearly using them to get a competitive advantage, the field would soon follow.

 

Thoughts?

 

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Forged irons control distance per individual iron easier, whether blade, CB or hollow body!

The blade, with skill, will give control of distance, height and direction easier, more precisely, than any other material!

I played blades my whole life except for last two sets; Apex 16 and now Epic Forged, both of these are distance player clubs, but The Epic Forge per individual iron swing produce the exact same yardage as a blade, because of the heads being forged! The lofts are jacked, the weight is low, but at 65, I can still get great results with no flyers from short grass!

This was not the case for Apex 16 were less distance consistent With occasional flyers from short grass!

For the pro, one year of extra distance on level greens means nothing, but firm, fast with hills, distance, as always, is king!

Once out of scoring clubs 7 up or 6 up depending on your shot height, anything that adds distance with accuracy is good to go, hence the 7wood is back and more PGA players are hitting hybrids!

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Points on distance control have the greatest merit in my opinion.  Todays Player distance and GI options increase overall distance however the drop off in distance resulting from sweet spot contact compared to heel/toe mishits is very significant.  While blades or even CB options offer less overall distance, the drop off for mishits ( as a percentage of total distance) is less significant.  This results in a smaller "spread" between sweet spot pure contact and heel toe slight misses and better overall distance control.  Typical pro's are not in need of the additional distance, control is the greater goal.   Amateurs' are most always looking for the extra 10 yards total distance on their irons  as a primary goal. 

An example of this is the Mizuno 210 vs the Hot metal options for the same club.  No question the 210's are super consistent however they are probably a club shorter than the Hot Metal version of the same club.  The spread on the Hot Metal club on sweet spot vs toe/heel hits can easily be a full club.  Flush on the mark sweet spot hits can sometimes add a full club distance.  The 210's are a half club difference at the most on comparable contact differences.    Not a scientific analysis but if you hit the two clubs I would suggest you may see similar patterns.   

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