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To the retirees - did you wait too long?


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Golf and retirement go together like biscuits and gravy so I’m looking for your input 

  I’m reaching a work situation where I have a choice to either dive into a new job or tap out and work on my chipping - the trade offs are obvious - less money vs more time 

Lots weighing on my mind; including watching some of my older friends having to give up the game but also watching my older siblings get nervous about pinching pennies in retirement 
 

So, I ask the Get Off My Lawn crowd - what say you?

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About 5 years ago I “knew” I was going to wait until I was 62 to retire (was 55 then) then my wife heard about a co-worker who passed away , he was still working because he said he could not afford to

I can't wait until retirement (i'm only 36 😂).

It depends on your financial situation, and everyone and every job is different, so it's hard to say.  I stayed on at my company until I was 68. Years earlier, I told my wife that I was now "semi-reti

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Only you know your financial status.  We have lots of seniors well into their 80s playing golf every day.

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31 minutes ago, OnTheGreenInPar said:

Golf and retirement go together like biscuits and gravy so I’m looking for your input 

  I’m reaching a work situation where I have a choice to either dive into a new job or tap out and work on my chipping - the trade offs are obvious - less money vs more time 

Lots weighing on my mind; including watching some of my older friends having to give up the game but also watching my older siblings get nervous about pinching pennies in retirement 
 

So, I ask the Get Off My Lawn crowd - what say you?

Only you can decide whether your financial situation and retirement plan works.  But just keep in mind that you don't get (and cannot buy) the years back.  

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22 minutes ago, OnTheGreenInPar said:

Golf and retirement go together like biscuits and gravy so I’m looking for your input 

  I’m reaching a work situation where I have a choice to either dive into a new job or tap out and work on my chipping - the trade offs are obvious - less money vs more time 

Lots weighing on my mind; including watching some of my older friends having to give up the game but also watching my older siblings get nervous about pinching pennies in retirement 
 

So, I ask the Get Off My Lawn crowd - what say you?

Sounds like you got options, which is a good thing,

Depends on money, medical, what does work mean to you.  Some people thrive on work, they don't realize it until its gone, then they go crazy.   I don't think that's me, I would be happy chipping.

Other people work longer than they want, and have no time after work is done.  This is sad for these people.

I'd just like to end my working days on my own terms, with a little dignity and respect.

 

 

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I'm 61. I will probably never be able to retire. This shutdown has pretty much killed any chance of that. I had planned to work until I was 70, but retirement seems unlikely now...... even if I ever get to go back to work.

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Lots of great thoughts from Forum member here and as many have said a lot depends on your financial position.

In my case, because I had to travel extensively, I retired at 62 -  I always feared dying in a motel room in some far off country. When I retired, I went from 100 miles an hour to 0, given my personality, it drove my wife and myself crazy. After two years I went back to work, commuting every week from Cleveland to Long Island - not an easy gig, however I was happier. This was not a financial issue but one of engagement. If you're healthy and can afford retirement do so but figure out a way to keep mentally and physically engaged. 

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Thanks for the replies.

addressing a couple things - I’m fully vested for lifetime medical coverage (and so is my wife through her job) - so that double stacked coverage removes a big “what if” that a lot of retirees need to worry about

Regarding money - suffice it to say that I would have more if I worked than if I retire.  I’m a frequent poster of FIRE forums (financial independence) FWIW

I’ve lost 6 friends and colleagues aged 54-56 in the last 3 years 

Just replaced the roof and floors and did a ton of maintenance - that’s a great point
 

Given my field if I leave I likely won’t be able to get back in. My best financial move is to hang on to my current job if I can. If I retire and have to go back to work it will be at a much much lower salary and position

i will be retiring both from something and to something - I’m confident in my ability to fill my days.  I won’t miss work and I won’t miss 90% of the people or 100% of the issues 

My current contract ends at age 59; the only question is whether I work until 62 or 59; ain’t no way I will make it to 65 

keep those thoughts coming !

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11 minutes ago, Siamese Moose said:

I was forced to retire at 42, but I was very lucky. I lost my job when the company had an accounting scandal, and figure this, a high tech company laid off all of the R&D, and hired more accountants. (They've since been sold multiple times, and have gone from dominant world leader to bit player.) My skills were highly valued, but also highly specialized. My only practical opportunities involved a major relocation. My wife's job paid better than mine, she loved it, and it covered my medical, so relocation was not happening. I looked for some local, lesser jobs in my field, but despite interviewers telling me how much they wanted my expertise, and would load all this responsibility on me, the offers were insulting. I ended up working some hobby jobs (homebrew store, a couple breweries where I set up QC labs, even a country club for a couple years) for almost as much money, and found the change totally enjoyable. My wife has since retired (at 53), and we're both busy with unpaid work we do for non-profits. However, I'll freely admit that I have too much downtime, and the pandemic has made life quite boring. I don't play near as much golf as I expected, as my normal partners are still not retired. My league has folded, and those players have drifted away. Most of the other retirees I meet at courses are older (I'm now 61), and they don't want to play with somebody who doesn't play the forward tees. I subbed for a couple of morning leagues, but didn't find a fit I liked (yet). Besides not playing as much, I don't practice as much as I thought I would. My body doesn't hold up to it. 

Long story short, the previous posters have given you all of the practical advice I would have offered. I've told my story as more data for you to have in your decision. Either way, I wish you the best of luck whatever you decide!


somewhat similar situation - my skills are deep but narrow 

I’m lucky in that one of my playing partners just retired and so did my brother, and I’ve also become a regular with a good group of guys at a local cigar lounge many of whom are retired or work flex schedules. I’m also very happy to fish or golf or do solo activities 

thank you for sharing that 

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My wife worked for my company starting in 1979 for 8 years then moved to another company for 8 years.  She was a photo "lab rat" and when the digital photo age came along, the company closed the wet lab and she bought all of the equipment and started her own business.  Eventually, she closed the wet part and went totally digital.  She sold her business in September 2019 before COVID-19... very fortunately!!!  The reason was that she turned 65 last month and decided to draw social security, because her family history says "there is no long life".  The average "sell by date" of both sides of her family is 66 years old.  Fortunately, she is the youngest of her siblings and saw all the things not to do!  Now she can spend her non-golf time working on her non-profit; however, that's on hold since COVID -19 has shut down those activities with high school students.

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We don’t stop playing the game because we get old; we get old because we stop playing the game.”

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My brother in law was in a situation similar to yours.  He debated retiring at 62 verses 65.  He ended up working to 65.  He talked with the owner of the company and changes were made to his job to keep him around the extra 3years.  Fewer hours, more vacation time and he got rid of a couple of projects he didn’t like working on.  He took a small cut in salary the last three years.  It worked well for him.  

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I have a goal to retire at 55 (god, 24 years from now) if I can so I can still enjoy my kids and be more active. Will see how my company’s stock does to see if that will be plausible. 
 

as for you, do what makes you happy. Like others said, you don’t get years back and a little less money shouldn’t matter as long as your state of mind is better. Good luck!

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I will be turning 62 in June. Due to starting over in life with wife # 2 and having two more children, retirement is not in the near future. My youngest is a senior in high school, so another to get through college. My Dad is 88 and I think I would still run away from him if he was coming after me. He still works one day a week to stay active. So I think health wise I got a while to go. I think one of the key issues is to have a job you like. I get to play a lot of golf for work. I get to travel and make my own schedule being in a Sales role. Sure it's still a job but it has it's bright side too.

Would I like to be retired... I really don't know.  I do know that I will be running out to play the Mega Millions today. It's up to a Billion dollars. Hey if I win I'll buy a golf course and you all can come and play on me. 

Back to reality... What ever you decide you have to be happy. Can you fill the days being retired? Will you miss having a job to go to? Since you are thinking about getting another job then get something you will enjoy. I know a few guys that retired then took a part time job at golf courses. Free golf and additional income to help out. 

Good luck in your decision.

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I retired at 65, 9 years ago. We wanted to retire earlier but medical was the problem, a big problem so we hung in there.


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I've worked a year in the last 4 due to being unemployed (ageism). I'm 62 and we're planning to retire in 18 months as my wife will be 65 then. We're moving to Florida then.

My "job" is to sell personal stuff in preparation for this. I play 2-4 times a week. I intend to play 5-7 in retirement.

We have adequate finances.

Retire when you can afford to live the life you want in retirement. Too many wait too long. My wife's co-workers have deemed themselves "slumpers". (I.e. they will die sluped over their desk at work) mainly because they have inadequate retirement savings and/or have no interests beyond work.



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I've been looking at my life during this 3rd lockdown in the UK and wondering what I have achieved and what I want out of life.

My partner and I are very opposite. I'm the saver and she is the spender. I took up contracting work last year with a view that I could work shorter periods with extended time off. She sees that as a chance for me to work all the time for more money wants a bigger house and fancier car etc and makes me feel lazy when I talk about taking a month or so out of work.

I follow the FIRE movement (Financial Independence Retire Early), but my plans for building up savings and investments are soon scuppered.

Its hard to make that big change though when you have been together for 9 years even though you know its not right for you

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