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Is the game of golf evolving? And is the evolution good?


cnosil

Is the game of golf evolving? And is the evolution good?  

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  1. 1. Is the game of golf evolving? And is the evolution good?

    • The game is evolving and the evolution is good.
      20
    • The game is evolving, I don’t like it but I am changing.
      4
    • The game is evolving. I don’t like it, and I am doing nothing different
      1
    • Nothing has really changed, fittings, strokes gained, launch monitors are useless and the old ways are superior.
      0
    • All this strokes gained and launch monitor stuff is wrong. The information it provides is simply wrong.
      0
    • Other?..
      9


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Over the last 10-15 years there has been minimal changes in equipment buy massive evolution in technology. When the Pro V1 was release in 2006 (i think) it was the first ball the reach the maximum speed allowed. Interestingly I have seen reviews that compare the latest Pro V1 with the original and the difference was minimal. The main change with regard to drivers and fairway woods is adjustable Hosels, if you look at reviews comparing for example the M1 verses the Sim 2 it will depend of the golfer which is better, but again the difference in distance is almost identical. The biggest innovation in equipment  has been the introduction of hybrids, but again this plateaued  5-6 years ago.

As far as Technology well that is an individual thing. Things like Trackman makes it easier for golf shots to provide lessons where before you really need to be on course or at a driving range, laser and GPS range finders should in theory speed up golf and it is simple to know your distance, but for some reason it they don't. One of the biggest issues I see with technology is the data overload. The amount of information that you can get is truly amazing but the majority of people do not have the skill level to utilise it, yet alone understand it. I like some technology and are looking forward to testing Arccos, it will be interesting to see what potential impact it may have on my game.    

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The whole strokes gained thing is fool’s gold. Data is good, but wh3n your variability is so large it won’t make a difference. Strokes gained will tell you to hit it far off the tee, but in reality for most keeping it in play is the best thing for you. Of course if the ball is further it gives you an advantage, wad this really a revelation? For mid to high handicap players the wasted strokes ( penalty, duffs, bad speed on lag putts that lead to 3 putts) cost way more strokes than the fractions that are gained with distance.

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I think the whole evolution of golf is a positive. My fear is that golf is going to turn into hive mind mentality regarding strokes gained and some other metrics. Strokes gained is a good metric but golf is a sport where every shot has unique circumstances and a data derived strategy isn't going to always be the correct answer. I wholeheartedly agree that distance helps, A LOT, however. The distance/accuracy question is going to be different on every course and that is going to be up to the individual golfer to determine. 

Regarding equipment, golf really hasn't changed to much the last couple years. I think pros have gotten dramatically stronger and better the last 15 years. There aren't many high level PGA pros left that don't look like a professional athlete. Athletics and fitness has officially caught up with golf. Technology has helped with distance some but for almost all golfers, the 460cc clubhead and CT limits all but certainly put a cap on technology gains. For many, the last place to gain performance from clubs is to get a proper fitting. Physical performance and club fitting have been known attributes for good golf for decades but it seems these two things have only really picked up steam the last couple years. 

I don't really know where golf goes from here. I think data will continue to become a bigger thing as it should be. Ultimately, being able to incorporate an individual's personal playing data with a club fitting will really help bridge the gap between strokes gained and real world needs. I think data will also go a long way in club design and maybe even being able to prove what designs work better and why. I think we have a good grasp on club design but I think there are still a lot of unanswered questions on golfers lean towards certain designs even if they aren't the most forgiving. I personally think there are certain ways the brain perceives feel that can't be solely explained with physics. I think more data could potentially provide some insights on this front. 

The other frontier in golf that is changing is how golf is experienced. Is Topgolf going to have a material impact on the golf industry? Are indoor simulators going to impact golf? These are going to be interesting areas to watch develop further. I personally think these avenues are only going to bring more people into the game as it gives people a way to experience golf without having to go through the arduous process of playing your first round on an actual course and trying find or rent equipment. 

Overall, I think the future of golf will be strong. My only fears are the rules of golf, especially regarding equipment, getting mucked up by manufacturers. I don't like the idea of bifurcation and think that golf is best if played equally from top to bottom. I'm fine with little rules changes for pace of play or simplification. However, I don't like the idea of different equipment for different levels of golf. 

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14 hours ago, 2puttbogey said:

The whole strokes gained thing is fool’s gold. Data is good, but wh3n your variability is so large it won’t make a difference

Strokes Gained evaluations will also help you choose a point to aim at, with the goal of limiting really bad outcomes.  A good player should aim a little bit away from trouble, a wilder player should aim substantially further from that trouble.  That could mean aiming at the edge of a fairway, or even the edge of the woods.  But the goal isn't ZERO balls OB or in a Penalty Area, if you do that you're aiming too far from the trouble.  Really good data can help you chart the optimal path around a golf course, to shoot the lowest possible scores without actually improving your skills.

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4 hours ago, DaveP043 said:

Strokes Gained evaluations will also help you choose a point to aim at, with the goal of limiting really bad outcomes.  A good player should aim a little bit away from trouble, a wilder player should aim substantially further from that trouble.  That could mean aiming at the edge of a fairway, or even the edge of the woods.  But the goal isn't ZERO balls OB or in a Penalty Area, if you do that you're aiming too far from the trouble.  Really good data can help you chart the optimal path around a golf course, to shoot the lowest possible scores without actually improving your skills.

That’s course management not strokes gained metrics. Yes I know that what you stated is in the book, but you need to know a lot more than how many strokes that are being gained or lost. The number is meaningless it’s up to the individual to understand their game. It doesn’t take some revelation and studying of data to figure out that going OB is bad and that in a game that the object is to get a ball in a hole that it’s advantageous to be closer to the hole. 

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8 minutes ago, 2puttbogey said:

That’s course management not strokes gained metrics. Yes I know that what you stated is in the book, but you need to know a lot more than how many strokes that are being gained or lost. The number is meaningless it’s up to the individual to understand their game. It doesn’t take some revelation and studying of data to figure out that going OB is bad and that in a game that the object is to get a ball in a hole that it’s advantageous to be closer to the hole. 

Strokes gained provides the supporting information for course management.   IMO, Strokes gained helps you understand that maybe you shouldn't try to thread that ball through the trees and get up to the green;  you need to pitch out.  People don't know how to apply the numbers beyond the I personally lost or gained strokes against some level of player.   Strokes gained sets expectations and from there you need to evaluate where your next shot should be played.  It isn't about what is bad,  but what is good. 

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5 minutes ago, cnosil said:

Strokes gained provides the supporting information for course management.   IMO, Strokes gained helps you understand that maybe you shouldn't try to thread that ball through the trees and get up to the green;  you need to pitch out.  People don't know how to apply the numbers beyond the I personally lost or gained strokes against some level of player.   Strokes gained sets expectations and from there you need to evaluate where your next shot should be played.  It isn't about what is bad,  but what is good. 

So DECADE

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32 minutes ago, 2puttbogey said:

 The number is meaningless it’s up to the individual to understand their game. 

This is the ENTIRE point of SG. I can't tell you the amount of people I have come across who think that putting equals 40% of their game. There is a huge difference between 40% of strokes and 40% of score. That's the genius of SG. 

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17 minutes ago, 2puttbogey said:

So DECADE

DECADE is a system that applies strokes gained.   What I described is a very small part of DECADE.   What I described is expectation management.

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27 minutes ago, 2puttbogey said:

So DECADE

DECADE is a direct follow-up to Strokes Gained.  As I understand it, DECADE offers the data collection and evaluation, and applies Strokes Gained to offer "advice" tailored to specific individuals and their games.

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On 9/9/2021 at 3:08 PM, CRW said:

When it comes to what you have listed I picked evolving/good.  

However, it seems other areas are evolving in a bad way. Specifically, the types of clientele and their lack of respect for the property when playing and their heckling when watching at tour events.  Anyone who yells anything after a shot at a tour event should automatically be ejected from the premises.  

This is the evolution that I’m disappointed by, but it’s how people behave today, and it has little if anything to do with golf.

As for tech I’m all for it, but I think too many players overestimate what launch monitors, fittings, etc. will do for them. It takes lessons and practice to consistently deliver the club face at the right angle and path - launch monitors and fittings won’t do it in most cases. I know plenty of guys with very expensive custom fitted clubs who haven’t improved at all. And I know quite a few very low HI players who’ve never been on a launch monitor and only play off the rack clubs they chose themselves.

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On 9/10/2021 at 12:05 PM, THEZIPR23 said:

Would love to hear the reasoning behind this thought?

While I haven't read the book, my understanding of the data is that it's too generalized, or it comes to the wrong conclusions. My reference point for this data is mostly from the PDFs Shot Scope put out awhile back. I think SG works for the pros because it tells them where they stand in competition and you can see the reasons why they actually won a tournament. I'll take Bryson's US Open win for example. Everyone goes on about his distance, but if you look at SG, he won that Open with his up and downs and putting. In a non-competitive round what good does some formula do for a bogey golfer to know that he hit his irons -1.2 strokes worse. Worse than what? Better than what? These are just numbers without meaning.

Then there's the conclusions and contradictions, which I'll be referencing Shot Scope. So in the first book, their argument is that Driver should be hit no matter what. But then in the fourth book on approach shots, they say players need to be in the fairway no matter what. Well which is it? Rip driver all the time regardless of where it winds up, or lay back and make sure you're in the fairway to provide a more accurate approach? There is no right answer to this question. The answer depends on the hole length, where is the trouble, what are the conditions, how the golfer is swinging that day, and what is the golfer's overall confidence level in that club and shot selection. Do just conclude that one should always do A or B, especially when A and B are wholly contradictory, is an invalid conclusion. On par 4s & 5s I just ask myself, what club gets me inside PW distance (<145 for me) so if a 5i does this, I then ask myself is it worth hitting driver? And make my decision based on all the above questions I mentioned above. All the questions Strokes Gained ignores because they conclude ALWAYS A or B.

Then there's the conclusions on approach shots hitting into greens. Again, they over generalize. They conclude that golfers need to ALWAYS go long of the pin. Because 70% of the time trouble, bunkers & ponds, are short of the green. the conclusion should be to always avoid trouble, not always go long. Players need to know their true carry yardages, and not plan based on best shot outcomes. Around Northern Ohio, our courses are older, and older courses are designed with greens that slope back to front. So if a player is going to try and play long they are likely to be faced with a long day of slick downhill chips and putts. Now maybe some are comfortable with this, but I don't know many that are. Give me uphill putts all day. Know your yardages, know your misses, and play what's comfortable.

Same goes for putting. I can't stand all this try to hit the ball 18 inches past the cup crap. Yes I am very old school on putting. I believe if you are trying to hit the putt past the hole, guess what, you are going to hit the putt past the hole. Going back to the Little Red Book- a putt that is hit too hard will hit the cup and spin away. A putt that dies at the hole with give luck a chance and tumble in. I see tons of three putts from players hitting their first past the cup, and very few from leaving it short. If you leave it short you've already read the putt and know the break and speed. When you putt long, you've got to figure it all out again. 

Forget Strokes Gained - it's Strokes Shaved baby

1. Hit the longest club you are comfortable with off the tee.

2. Don't be a hero if you get in trouble off the tee, take your medicine and keep it in play.

3. Know your misses and carry yardages with irons. 

4. When chipping use the club that gets the ball rolling the soonest.

5. Let the ball die into the hole when putting.

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14 minutes ago, DiscipleofPenick said:

While I haven't read the book, my understanding of the data is that it's too generalized, or it comes to the wrong conclusions. My reference point for this data is mostly from the PDFs Shot Scope put out awhile back. I think SG works for the pros because it tells them where they stand in competition and you can see the reasons why they actually won a tournament. I'll take Bryson's US Open win for example. Everyone goes on about his distance, but if you look at SG, he won that Open with his up and downs and putting. In a non-competitive round what good does some formula do for a bogey golfer to know that he hit his irons -1.2 strokes worse. Worse than what? Better than what? These are just numbers without meaning.

Then there's the conclusions and contradictions, which I'll be referencing Shot Scope. So in the first book, their argument is that Driver should be hit no matter what. But then in the fourth book on approach shots, they say players need to be in the fairway no matter what. Well which is it? Rip driver all the time regardless of where it winds up, or lay back and make sure you're in the fairway to provide a more accurate approach? There is no right answer to this question. The answer depends on the hole length, where is the trouble, what are the conditions, how the golfer is swinging that day, and what is the golfer's overall confidence level in that club and shot selection. Do just conclude that one should always do A or B, especially when A and B are wholly contradictory, is an invalid conclusion. On par 4s & 5s I just ask myself, what club gets me inside PW distance (<145 for me) so if a 5i does this, I then ask myself is it worth hitting driver? And make my decision based on all the above questions I mentioned above. All the questions Strokes Gained ignores because they conclude ALWAYS A or B.

Then there's the conclusions on approach shots hitting into greens. Again, they over generalize. They conclude that golfers need to ALWAYS go long of the pin. Because 70% of the time trouble, bunkers & ponds, are short of the green. the conclusion should be to always avoid trouble, not always go long. Players need to know their true carry yardages, and not plan based on best shot outcomes. Around Northern Ohio, our courses are older, and older courses are designed with greens that slope back to front. So if a player is going to try and play long they are likely to be faced with a long day of slick downhill chips and putts. Now maybe some are comfortable with this, but I don't know many that are. Give me uphill putts all day. Know your yardages, know your misses, and play what's comfortable.

Same goes for putting. I can't stand all this try to hit the ball 18 inches past the cup crap. Yes I am very old school on putting. I believe if you are trying to hit the putt past the hole, guess what, you are going to hit the putt past the hole. Going back to the Little Red Book- a putt that is hit too hard will hit the cup and spin away. A putt that dies at the hole with give luck a chance and tumble in. I see tons of three putts from players hitting their first past the cup, and very few from leaving it short. If you leave it short you've already read the putt and know the break and speed. When you putt long, you've got to figure it all out again. 

Forget Strokes Gained - it's Strokes Shaved baby

1. Hit the longest club you are comfortable with off the tee.

2. Don't be a hero if you get in trouble off the tee, take your medicine and keep it in play.

3. Know your misses and carry yardages with irons. 

4. When chipping use the club that gets the ball rolling the soonest.

5. Let the ball die into the hole when putting.

I think unfortunately the Shot Scope books seemed to have done you a disservice, because as you mention Strokes Gained is just a numeric evaluation of the performance but it takes a system like DECADE to help take that data and distill meaning from it. DECADE would indeed tell you if the hole is too narrow between hazards then driver will not be the play say and that taking less than driver is fine generally if it leaves you with a wedge or less in. I am not overly familiar with the specifics of DECADE but I have never heard DECADE say to always hit the ball past pin, more about like what you said know your distances and picking better aim points and such. Of course play the game however you find best, but I think personally stokes gained and system like DECADE to analyze this will help give you the best chance to shoot your lowest scores, this has worked for me this year. And I would say on your own you are closer to DECADE strategy than you might think.

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2 minutes ago, ejgaudette said:

I think unfortunately the Shot Scope books seemed to have done you a disservice, because as you mention Strokes Gained is just a numeric evaluation of the performance but it takes a system like DECADE to help take that data and distill meaning from it. DECADE would indeed tell you if the hole is too narrow between hazards then driver will not be the play say and that taking less than driver is fine generally if it leaves you with a wedge or less in. I am not overly familiar with the specifics of DECADE but I have never heard DECADE say to always hit the ball past pin, more about like what you said know your distances and picking better aim points and such. Of course play the game however you find best, but I think personally stokes gained and system like DECADE to analyze this will help give you the best chance to shoot your lowest scores, this has worked for me this year. And I would say on your own you are closer to DECADE strategy than you might think.

DECaDE does not say to always hit past the pin.  Lou Stagner has shown statistics that indicate that players score better when they hit past the hole.  Of course that is not always the best option on a back pin.   DECADE does say don’t intentionally try to leave yourself and uphill putt because you will not decrease your scoring by any measureable number.   DECADE also stresses dispersion medicating that you will hit somewhere within your shot cone; that could be long, short, left, or right and on any given shot you don’t know which you are going to get.   

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8 minutes ago, cnosil said:

DECaDE does not say to always hit past the pin.  Lou Stagner has shown statistics that indicate that players score better when they hit past the hole.  Of course that is not always the best option on a back pin.   DECADE does say don’t intentionally try to leave yourself and uphill putt because you will not decrease your scoring by any measureable number.   DECADE also stresses dispersion medicating that you will hit somewhere within your shot cone; that could be long, short, left, or right and on any given shot you don’t know which you are going to get.   

That is basically what I thought the approach principals were. Its is crazy hearing Lou talk about hitting past the hole and how that leads to the proximity difference between the best players and those loosing their cards. Getting past a bit more generally reduces proximity leading to more putts made and lower scores.

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30 minutes ago, DiscipleofPenick said:

. I think SG works for the pros because it tells them where they stand in competition and you can see the reasons why they actually won a tournament.. In a non-competitive round what good does some formula do for a bogey golfer to know that he hit his irons -1.2 strokes worse. Worse than what? Better than what? These are just numbers without meaning.

So in the first book, their argument is that Driver should be hit no matter what. But then in the fourth book on approach shots, they say players need to be in the fairway no matter what.. The answer depends on the hole length, where is the trouble, what are the conditions, how the golfer is swinging that day, and what is the golfer's overall confidence level in that club and shot selection.
 

All the questions Strokes Gained ignores because they conclude ALWAYS A or B.

 

Forget Strokes Gained - it's Strokes Shaved baby

1. Hit the longest club you are comfortable with off the tee.

2. Don't be a hero if you get in trouble off the tee, take your medicine and keep it in play.

3. Know your misses and carry yardages with irons. 

4. When chipping use the club that gets the ball rolling the soonest.

5. Let the ball die into the hole when putting.

IMO,  Strokes gained works for golfers trying to improve their game as it helps identify where they are losing the most strokes.  Yes, for some golfers it is painfully obvious because they duff shots or hit the ball OB or have too many penalties but as a players game becomes more refined it can helps target specific skills to work on. 
 

I don’t remember the details in those  documents but you are correct that those contradictions  are big confusion areas   Yes I want to be in the fairway,  but you are correct on all those decisions on a hole.  You need to assess you game and abilities to decide how to play a hole.  That said,  unless a player has significant struggles with a club, a shorter club and the lost distance does not generally result in lower scores as player don’t hit the fairway more often if they go to lesser clubs.  
 

not sure how you are distinguishing strokes gained vs  your strokes shaved, but your items sound a lot like strokes gained thoughts.  You’d have to provide. Ore detail on intent to really say you don’t follow stroke gained.  

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Fairway: :titelist-small: TS3 15* set  to 16.5* w/Project X Hzardous Smoke
Hybrids:  :titelist-small: 816H1 19* set at 18* w/KBS Tour Graphite Hybrid Prototype
                :titelist-small: 915H  21*  w/KBS Tour Graphite Hybrid Prototype
               :titelist-small: 915H 24*  w/KBS Tour Graphite Hybrid Prototype
Irons:      :honma:TR20V 6-11 w/Vizard TR20-85 Graphite
Wedge:  :callaway-small: 54-10S   :cleveland-small: 588  58-12
Putter:  :seemore-small: mFGP2

Backups:  :bobby-grace-1: 6330, :taylormade-small:TM-180, :odyssey-small: Milled Collection RSX 2, Bellum Winmore 787

 

Member:  MGS Hitsquad since 2017697979773_DSCN2368(Custom).JPG.a1a25f5e430d9eebae93c5d652cbd4b9.JPG

 

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2 minutes ago, ejgaudette said:

That is basically what I thought the approach principals were. Its is crazy hearing Lou talk about hitting past the hole and how that leads to the proximity difference between the best players and those loosing their cards. Getting past a bit more generally reduces proximity leading to more putts made and lower scores.

I am not so sure it is about actually being past the hole.  It is about a players dispersion circle.  Yes you need to understand the green complex but being on the green is always better than having to chip or use a putter from off the green.   He is really advocating things like for a front pin, you want to target more to the middle to accommodate the part of the pattern that is short of the hole.  Some shots will be front of the green, some pin high, and some mode or farther back.   For a back pin,  you want to pick a club that has the long part if you pattern near the back of the green; which may mean targeting the middle or 3/4 back but not past the pin.   

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Driver:  :ping-small: G400 Max 9* w/ KBS Tour Driven
Fairway: :titelist-small: TS3 15* set  to 16.5* w/Project X Hzardous Smoke
Hybrids:  :titelist-small: 816H1 19* set at 18* w/KBS Tour Graphite Hybrid Prototype
                :titelist-small: 915H  21*  w/KBS Tour Graphite Hybrid Prototype
               :titelist-small: 915H 24*  w/KBS Tour Graphite Hybrid Prototype
Irons:      :honma:TR20V 6-11 w/Vizard TR20-85 Graphite
Wedge:  :callaway-small: 54-10S   :cleveland-small: 588  58-12
Putter:  :seemore-small: mFGP2

Backups:  :bobby-grace-1: 6330, :taylormade-small:TM-180, :odyssey-small: Milled Collection RSX 2, Bellum Winmore 787

 

Member:  MGS Hitsquad since 2017697979773_DSCN2368(Custom).JPG.a1a25f5e430d9eebae93c5d652cbd4b9.JPG

 

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Maybe there is a certain quality level for a golfer where all the data is useful.  I know it's not at my level.  I don't need data to tell me anything about my game.  I can see all I need to know every time I play.  I know what parts of my game are good and what's bad.  I work on that which is bad, and hopefully don't diminish my good parts as I do.  I honestly don't believe that having the data would make me practice or play any better.  

To sum up my game:

  • I always hit my driver on par 4 and 5; I hit my driver in the fairway... mostly.
  • I hit my FW/hybrid straight... unless I mishit them.
  • I hit my irons straight... unless I mishit them.
  • I get up and down from around the green... about average.
  • I one- and two- putt most of the time; tendency is to be just past the hole if missed.

If I consistently made good contact with the ball, then data might be useful.  I lose strokes on mishits from the fairway.  Fewer mishits means low scores; more mishits means high scores... simple as that.

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We don’t stop playing the game because we get old; we get old because we stop playing the game.”

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41 minutes ago, DiscipleofPenick said:

Forget Strokes Gained - it's Strokes Shaved baby

1. Hit the longest club you are comfortable with off the tee.

2. Don't be a hero if you get in trouble off the tee, take your medicine and keep it in play.

3. Know your misses and carry yardages with irons. 

4. When chipping use the club that gets the ball rolling the soonest.

5. Let the ball die into the hole when putting.

While I am an Accountant/Statistician by trade, and find SG fascinating (Read Mark Broadie's book a few times, as well as Dave Pels on putting many years ago), I don't disagree with your comments DoP.  It is REALLY easy to get Paralysis by Analysis when diving into SG.  And for the most part, my results show me what I really already know.... I suck with my approach game and need to improve it to lower my scores.  I think SG makes a lot of sense when you are working in the decimals, not in the whole numbers (where I am - even compared to scratch golfers... let alone pro golfers).  I love strokes gained for what it is... additional detailed information that keeps my head in the round while I'm playing.  One advantage that I have seen in tracking my SG is knowing every single yardage I'm playing from.  Tee to fairway to chips to putts.  I admit, before SG, I wasn't pacing off chips and putts so I could record them accurately... but having done so for a few months now... I have a better feel for my execution for those shots now.  

But when I tee off, I am:

  • Hitting the longest club I am comfortable with off the tee (Driver)
  • Regularly taking my medicine and keep it in play (more often than I would like).
  • Intimately knowledgeable of my misses and and somewhat my carry yardages with irons (too many misses) 
  • Chipping using the club that gets the ball rolling the soonest, and
  • Letting the ball die into the hole when putting (always been a "die at the hole" putter - and would add this.... endeavor to always miss on the high "Pro" side of the hole).

Then when I finish my round, I stop off at the range and pull out my 7 iron to figure out why I can hit a green.  

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  • Srixon Z7 Driver
  • Srixon ZX 3W, 5W & 7W
  • Titleist 2021 T200 5-GW
  • Nike V-Forged 52-10 & 56-14
  • Odyssey White Hot OG 7s Putter
  • Maxfli Tour
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1 hour ago, ejgaudette said:

I think unfortunately the Shot Scope books seemed to have done you a disservice, because as you mention Strokes Gained is just a numeric evaluation of the performance but it takes a system like DECADE to help take that data and distill meaning from it. DECADE would indeed tell you if the hole is too narrow between hazards then driver will not be the play say and that taking less than driver is fine generally if it leaves you with a wedge or less in. I am not overly familiar with the specifics of DECADE but I have never heard DECADE say to always hit the ball past pin, more about like what you said know your distances and picking better aim points and such. Of course play the game however you find best, but I think personally stokes gained and system like DECADE to analyze this will help give you the best chance to shoot your lowest scores, this has worked for me this year. And I would say on your own you are closer to DECADE strategy than you might think.

Maybe I am close, as I'm wholly unfamiliar with DECADE. All I know is my true yardages, my misses, and I track my stats through the USGA app. I make my decisions in the moment, I don't need an abstract statistic to help how. However, given what you said then DECADE may be the other piece of the puzzle that I was unaware of, which means I see your point and agree with you.

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Take Dead Aim

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