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Shafts to help draw the ball


jonyim
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None of them are going to produce more or less draw. That's a product of face directionality/weight bias and attacking the ball from the inside with a square face. want to experiment? Add a few inches of lead tape to the heel of your club and it'll change the bias and make it easier to close the face.

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Strong 3 wood: Taylormade M1 15* w/ ProjectX T1100 HZRDUS handcrafted 75x
3 Hybrid: Adams PRO 18* w/ KBS Tour Hybrid S flex tipped 1/2"
4 Hybrid: Adams PRO 20* (bent to 21*) w/ KBS Tour Hybrid S flex tipped 1/2"
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I agree with Rookie, this is not a shaft issue. For me to draw the ball, I rotate my hands stronger (more to the right), move my right (trail) foot back a little, and swing to hit the ball at the 7 o'clock position. To hit a fade it is just the opposite.

 

Weaken my grip, move my left foot back, hit the ball on the 5 o'clock position. Now, while in reality I am hitting the ball probably at the 6 o'clock position on all of these shot, I am thinking about hitting it at the 7 o'clock position which means that I have to approach the ball from the inside, or from the 5 o'clock position meaning I swing outside to inside.

 

I personally, always try to move the ball right to left or left to right. I always decide what I want to do before I get my club. The reason why is simple. I know which was the ball is going to miss when I hit it. I do have some go to shots if the hole does not dictate which is best. I fade the driver, hit draws with hybrids and long irons and fade the short irons.

 

Driver:      :ping-small:  G425MAX 10.5° -1° Flat on Fujikura VENTUS Blue 5S

Fairway:   :ping-small:  G410 3 wood LST & 5  Wood Flat on :ping-small: Alta CB 65R

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A shot shape is purely controlled from downswing sequence. No shaft is going to help you draw the ball more or less as RB7 has already said. The only way to get a shaft to help you draw the ball is to be playing to weak of a shaft for your swing and having the shaft flip over the club head into impact without moving your wrists. The shaft twists and over recovers when it is too weak a lot of times. Over recovery of a golf shaft can not be timed or tamed into consistent strikes, you are likely to spry the ball all over the place rather then just have one playing ball flight.

Callaway Epic Max 12.0 (-1/N) @ 44.50" w/ Graphite Design Tour AD IZ-7 Stiff

Callaway Epic Speed 18.0* @ 42.75" w/ Graphite Design Tour AD IZ-8 Stiff

Callaway Mavrik Pro 23.0* @ 40.00" w/ Graphite Design Tour AD IZ 95 HYB Stiff

Sub-70 639 Combo (5-P) w/ Nippon Modus 3 125 Stiff, Standard Length, Weak Lofts (27-47, 4* gaps)

Callaway MD5 Raw 51-11 S-Grind w/ Nippon Modus 125 Wedge

Callaway MD5 Raw 55-13 X-Grind w/ Nippon Modus 125 Wedge

Callaway MD5 Raw 59-11 S-Grind w/ Nippon Modus 125 Wedge

Callaway MD5 Raw 63-09 C-Grind w/ Nippon Modus 125 Wedge

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I had to dig through my email to find this, but JB is right that torque will affect the path of your ball flight. Here's an explanation on torque, though the title pretty much says it all when it comes to selecting a shaft.

 

http://blog.hirekogolf.com/2008/06/%E2%80%9Cshut-up-hit-the-ball%E2%80%9D/

 

I'm pretty sure the article was written for the 95% of amateurs who don't hit the ball 300 yards. Torque does become important for very high clubhead speeds, but for most people not so much.

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I both agree and also disagree.

 

The shaft cannot, by itself, make a draw or a slice happen, by my experience. However shaping shots is a lot easier to do and control when the shaft is well within your skill level and swing type as against something that is at your borders. For me, a shaft that is well within my level is simply easier to swing under control and does not require any funny extra moves.

 

I admit I don't go looking for or reading about shafts and their promises until I feel the one I have is no longer comfortable.

 

 

Shambles

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I both agree and also disagree.

 

The shaft cannot, by itself, make a draw or a slice happen, by my experience. However shaping shots is a lot easier to do and control when the shaft is well within your skill level and swing type as against something that is at your borders. For me, a shaft that is well within my level is simply easier to swing under control and does not require any funny extra moves.

 

I admit I don't go looking for or reading about shafts and their promises until I feel the one I have is no longer comfortable.

 

Shambles

 

+1

 

Like so much of what we talk about here, it basically boils down to fitting. As Shambles said, a shaft can help you better control the swing, which ultimately means it can help you control the ball flight.

 

As others have said, there's probably no such thing as a shaft that has an inherent draw bias, however; design elements like bend/kick point, torque, and weight all play a roll in how a given shaft will impact ball flight.

 

 

Contrary to what most of us have been taught, and what our perceptions are...club tracking (FlightScope/Trackman) shows us that most draws are actually hit with an open face. The face largely determines where the ball starts (open face, starts right), the path is responsible for curvature.

 

As an example, if your face is 2 degrees open, and your path is 4 degrees inside out, you're going to hit a draw. If your face is 2 degrees closed, that same 4 degree path will produce a push hook. Angle of attack plays a role, but this is the simplified reality.

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