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Assuming our putting green has been cut recently, today I will be mainly holing lots and lots of short putts :)

 

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junk2005-1.jpg?t=1277522460

 

You can just about make out the feint blue chalk line between the alignment sticks. Can only find blue chalk here so far, I'm guessing white would be better but from above the ball the blue is still very visable.

 

The tee is in the back of the hole to give me a nice small target to aim at.

 

Anyone wanting to improve on those 3 - 4 footers should give this a go. It's hard not to follow the symmetrical lines and get into a good rhythm of rolling putts in.

 

As a side note, I never 'see' the ball go in, instead I hear it drop and can just about 'sense' it out of the corner of my vision. Listening to the ball drop (or not as the case may be) is one of the best putting tips I ever picked up in my youth! :)

Great drill. I agree with your side note of not following the ball with your eyes or your head, but just listening for the drop. Makes for a much more accurate putt.

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Great idea - gives you the follow through on getting it close and putting it in. I'm into this one!

I usually try using 4 balls at a time, trying to get the ball within a 3 foot circle around the hole. Helps with my accuracy and touch.

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I like the drills Pugh - especially for putting. I might borrow some of those.

 

For chipping... well... sometimes we tend to complicate things too much. Here is my chipping drill:

 

1) Fill shag bag full of balls

2) Empty balls from shag bag onto ground

3) Chip balls into hole until all the balls have been hit

4) Walk onto green to retrieve balls and fill shag bag

5) Move to a new spot and repeat step 1 (MANY times)

 

I recommend this drill to all you high handicappers out there. Spend AT LEAST as much time chipping as you do on the driving range practicing your full swing. It never ceases to amaze me how many weekend golfers can't hit a simple chip.

 

This was a public service announcement. I now return you to your regularly scheduled program. :)

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I like the drills Pugh - especially for putting. I might borrow some of those.

 

For chipping... well... sometimes we tend to complicate things too much. Here is my chipping drill:

 

1) Fill shag bag full of balls

2) Empty balls from shag bag onto ground

3) Chip balls into hole until all the balls have been hit

4) Walk onto green to retrieve balls and fill shag bag

5) Move to a new spot and repeat step 1 (MANY times)

 

I recommend this drill to all you high handicappers out there. Spend AT LEAST as much time chipping as you do on the driving range practicing your full swing. It never ceases to amaze me how many weekend golfers can't hit a simple chip.

 

This was a public service announcement. I now return you to your regularly scheduled program. :D

 

You missed a few:

 

-Walk past green to pick up balls you bladed,

-Walk into sand trap short of green to pick up balls you chunked, and

-Walk to the right of green to pick up balls you shanked. :)

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You missed a few:

 

-Walk past green to pick up balls you bladed,

-Walk into sand trap short of green to pick up balls you chunked, and

-Walk to the right of green to pick up balls you shanked. :)

 

LOL. Yeah, that's possible, but in my case I'm a 14 more because of inconsistent iron play and putting. Chipping is usually not my issue (probably because of the amount of time I spend on it). ;)

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I like the drills Pugh - especially for putting. I might borrow some of those.

 

For chipping... well... sometimes we tend to complicate things too much. Here is my chipping drill:

 

1) Fill shag bag full of balls

2) Empty balls from shag bag onto ground

3) Chip balls into hole until all the balls have been hit

4) Walk onto green to retrieve balls and fill shag bag

5) Move to a new spot and repeat step 1 (MANY times)

 

I recommend this drill to all you high handicappers out there. Spend AT LEAST as much time chipping as you do on the driving range practicing your full swing. It never ceases to amaze me how many weekend golfers can't hit a simple chip.

 

This was a public service announcement. I now return you to your regularly scheduled program. B)

 

Ok, this may ruffle a few feathers but I strongly advise against practicing your short game that way! ;)

 

Let me explain why...

 

I'm guessing said shag bag holds anything from 30 - 100 balls depending on size. Hitting that many chip / pitch shots from the same place is, only in my opinion of course, mind numbingly boring. Worse still I believe it to be counter productive. Sure, the first 3 - 5 balls may be a quick learning curve but once you've got the 'feel' of the distance all you're doing is repeating the same shot over and over. To make matters worse, as the attention level drops with the more balls hit, balls that have finished around the target now become obstacles. Potentially good chip shots strike other balls short and end up nowhere near the hole or worse still, balls that would fly past the hole strike another and stay close to the hole, both giving 'false feedback'.

 

I agree, there is a time and a place for standing and hitting numerous shots in order to learn the skill of lifting a ball into the air. However, chipping requires little technique to lift the ball, once this skill has been aquired it's time to move on and concentrate on learning how different clubs perform and learning about landing areas, amount of roll etc etc. When I have taught chipping, once a student could demonstrate that they could lift the ball and land it in a large target like say a bunker, reasonably consistently, that was the basic technique done.

 

I've spent many years watching fellow golfers practice in the 'quantity not quality' manner described. Very rarely does it improve the golfers skill for reading greens, understanding how different clubs work etc. Sure, it may improve their ability to hit the ball into the air and run it that particular distance but what happens out on the golf course when the first 9 missed greens offer different length tests!?

 

Now, I'm also not saying that it's 'my way or the highway' :)

 

The chipping drill that I posted a few days ago is one of many I try when I spend time on and around the practice green. I mix up my practice between target practice (both short chips and longer) and competitive practice. Again, in my opinion, there is no better practice than competitive practice. I have spent literally thousands of hours of my life having informal chipping competitions against fellow high or low handicap / pro golfers.

 

This usually goes along the lines of 2 or 3 balls each. All players using the same club, a hole is chosen and shots are hit alternately towards it. Closest to the hole may get 2 points, 2nd place 1 point and a bonus of say 5 points if you manage to chip it in. Added incentives can be the furthest from the hole retrieves all the balls before the winner of the 'hole' choses the next location and target hole.

 

This kind of practice means you are constantly changing the shot type and club. Over a bunker followed by a long chip and run followed by a lob shot then a bunker shot. I try and mix it up as much as possible. Why? Because it keeps the brain working, you have to constantly ask yourself - "Ok, where do I need to land this to make it run down that slope to the pin?" Correct me if I'm wrong but on the golf course we don't get 30 - 100 goes at getting a chip shot right. We don't even get 2 or 3 so you could argue that 'my way' is too generous! :D

 

Damn it, I've waffled on much longer than intended. I'm by no means 'having a go' at Mr A2G. This is just years and years of experience speaking here from, dare I say it, a pretty good exponant of the short game.

 

I have worked hard to remove any signs of 'hit 'n drag' practice from my routine over the years. If like me, you wish to improve at this crazy game... I suggest you do the same :)

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Pughdog, I've printed off the drills you've recommended and will be giving them a try. Thanks for the tips!

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Grab 'em now before I decide to write a book on it and charge money for this info! ;)

 

The important thing is to try to make all practice as interesting and fun as possible, not just short game of course. I figure if I share my drills on here maybe someone will come up with a couple in return for me to try.

 

Unfortunately I have nowhere to practice them at the moment. I complained to our golf mamager about the practice green being scruffy, it doesn't get cut from one day to the next recently and there are flags missing from the holes etc. Not sure if he was making a point but yesterday they dumped a ton of sand all over it :lol: It's unusable for a while. The Malaysian way seems to be if there's a bare patch - dump sand on it. Hey ho.

 

Anyone with any drills of their own or ideas shout out...

 

I had a great idea for a kind of 'battle' chipping drill the other day, still working on the logistics to make it work.

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I tried the "Chip onto a towel" drill yesterday, and let me tell you: not easy. For one thing, it was very counterintuitive for me because I prefer to look at my end target, not where I land my ball, but I don't think there's any harm in being able to do both. I spent a lot of time hitting 5 yard chips, but every time I hit the tee (I used a tee, didn't have a gum box) it was like an instant jolt of energy/concentration.

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I tried the "Chip onto a towel" drill yesterday, and let me tell you: not easy. For one thing, it was very counterintuitive for me because I prefer to look at my end target, not where I land my ball, but I don't think there's any harm in being able to do both. I spent a lot of time hitting 5 yard chips, but every time I hit the tee (I used a tee, didn't have a gum box) it was like an instant jolt of energy/concentration.

 

I don't always look at the landing point out on the course either. I try to but sometimes it just 'feels' right to look at the hole. However, as you say, I don't think it does any harm to practice landing the ball exactly.

 

Stick at it, it gets easier the more times you try :lol:

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Especially with short chips/pitches, I think its a good idea to look at the landing area. Plan your target and then, like putting, dont look at the flag. Chose your line correctly, choose the spot and plan for the roll out then hit the spot and you'll get it in or close. :lol:

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our high school golf coach has a putting drill that many of you probably know called 3,6,9 put a tee at 3 feet 6 feet and 9 feet grab three balls and try making all of them if you miss one go back to 3 feet and start again until you have completed it, i think it works very well

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our high school golf coach has a putting drill that many of you probably know called 3,6,9 put a tee at 3 feet 6 feet and 9 feet grab three balls and try making all of them if you miss one go back to 3 feet and start again until you have completed it, i think it works very well

 

I've been doing this drill for a couple years now, it's a great one. Not one I would have my HS golfers do, because I don't want practice lasting all night!

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I've been lucky enough to find a new 'home course' to practice at. The putting green is great so I've been able to go through my drills again. I have a number of friends across the globe that I 'compete' against weekly with our scores.... got me thinking.

 

Anyone up for a MGS Putting Drill challenge? :huh:

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I'm up for it, though I don't know how often I'd be able to post my scores. My practice schedule varies wildly and sometimes the green is too crowded for the longer putts. That said, I'll be happy to post my score when I get a chance to do the whole drill.

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I'm up for it, though I don't know how often I'd be able to post my scores. My practice schedule varies wildly and sometimes the green is too crowded for the longer putts. That said, I'll be happy to post my score when I get a chance to do the whole drill.

 

Well rather than having weekly competitions we could have a monthly one on each drill? Folk just post up their scores as and when they get chance to have a go or when they beat their own best score.

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Well rather than having weekly competitions we could have a monthly one on each drill? Folk just post up their scores as and when they get chance to have a go or when they beat their own best score.

 

Sounds like fun to me. You might want to start a whole thread just for that so we don't overload this thread with scores.

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Ok, this may ruffle a few feathers but I strongly advise against practicing your short game that way! :blink:

 

Let me explain why...

 

I'm guessing said shag bag holds anything from 30 - 100 balls depending on size. Hitting that many chip / pitch shots from the same place is, only in my opinion of course, mind numbingly boring. Worse still I believe it to be counter productive. Sure, the first 3 - 5 balls may be a quick learning curve but once you've got the 'feel' of the distance all you're doing is repeating the same shot over and over. To make matters worse, as the attention level drops with the more balls hit, balls that have finished around the target now become obstacles. Potentially good chip shots strike other balls short and end up nowhere near the hole or worse still, balls that would fly past the hole strike another and stay close to the hole, both giving 'false feedback'.

 

 

OK, let me weigh in on the other side. I think this is a great way to work on your chip/pitch technique. I have a tendency to get too "handsy" (throwaway) with these shots, and a slight blade may hit a soft spot and die near the hole, or a slight chunk will run up to an acceptable distance. Beginning the short game practice with a "contact only" perspective enables me to focus on technique. Later, I will move around the green and begin to select targets. However, I think simply showing up for short game practice is sound advice for 95% of golfers.

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OK, let me weigh in on the other side. I think this is a great way to work on your chip/pitch technique. I have a tendency to get too "handsy" (throwaway) with these shots, and a slight blade may hit a soft spot and die near the hole, or a slight chunk will run up to an acceptable distance. Beginning the short game practice with a "contact only" perspective enables me to focus on technique. Later, I will move around the green and begin to select targets. However, I think simply showing up for short game practice is sound advice for 95% of golfers.

 

Dangerously Long Reply Alert! :D

 

I agree that some practice is better than no practice at all but as the thread is entitled "Best short game drills" I thought I'd point out that, and again IMHO, the chip and drag technique shouldn't be used too often for regular practice. Warming up? OK, but the danger is folk get lazy and feel they can 'hit more balls' that way so why then go back to only 3 balls? It's the old quality v quantity argument again.

 

Maybe I didn't explain my use of the drills clearly. For a golfer that has technique issues, 'handsy' movement or irregular contact, I can see that repetition can be a cure. I'm still not sold on hitting lots of balls to the same hole. I would rather see someone chipping a lot of balls into say a chipping net or into a bunker, as big a target as possible. If the target is easy or even better unimportant then the golfer can concentrate more on the technique.

 

I realise this forum has a huge range of golfers with differing abilities and I appreciate that many golfers practice in different ways or not at all. I am talking from my own experience, not just my own short game but also coaching thousands of golfers with varying levels of short game skill. As I think I pointed out earlier, a complete beginner would not be given these drills straight away. I would find easy ways to gently break a golfer into the world of chipping practice first. However, and it's a big HOWEVER.... :blink:

 

...When a golfer is stood practicing chipping thinking about their technique, the likely hood is concentration very quickly moves away from targets and feel. Once you start to think technical thoughts, it gets pretty difficult to execute a smooth chip shot that lands where you want it to. More likely the stroke may improve but the timing and feel will need to be adjusted later on. Hitting good chip shots whilst thinking how you are doing it rather than where you want the ball to land / go is difficult. We're getting back to the old 'train it then trust it' situation here. Ideally, once someone is happy enough that they can loft most balls in the air and their technique isn't too flawed I'd say they were ready to move on and start to forget about technique and embrace the challenge of getting better at controlling their golf ball.

 

There are many many golfers out there that believe that their chipping (we could use this analogy for putting and every other shot in the bag) technique has to be perfect to work. That anything out of the ordinary, be it a bit too much wrists or a shortened follow through will be frowned upon and can't possibly work under pressure. This belief is reinforced by listening to TV commentators who constantly analyse top golfers techniques live on air and point out all the correct things the player does and why this makes them a better chipper / putter / driver etc. When someone 'different' comes along (I'm thinking Billy Mayfair's putting stroke here or even Jim Furyk's full swing) it's quickly pointed out by the back-tracking analyst that "Billy's putter face points to the intended line at impact, that's the most important thing" or "Jims swing just before impact is the same as Tigers blah blah blah". My point is that suddenly, perfect technique goes out of the window.

 

I have been around the game long enough to understand a golfers concern however of doing something 'wrong'. Phana24JG, you talk of a fault of being 'handsy' with your chipping. Without seeing your technique in the flesh of course it would be wrong of me to comment on whether that is what is holding back your short game. But, and it's a big but, I think that it's your fear of being 'handsy' that probably effects your chipping control more than the actual amount of wrists in the stroke. I have had the privilage of watching up close and practicing with some pretty good golfers. Let me tell you, some of the best chippers and short game players I have ever seen had very active hands. Think Seve in his hay day. Mickleson with his famous flop. That shot would never and arguably should never be taught to a golfer as the risk outweighs the reward. Phil managed to use it for a good length of time with critisism usually only coming when the shot (rarely) went wrong.

 

My god I ramble on when I get going eh! My point is this. Things are deemed to be 'wrong' if they don't work. I believe that almost all golfers would benefit from thinking about their short game in a less technical way. If a player uses 'too much' wrists but chips well I believe there is no point in changing that technique as long as the player is confident and consistent with it. Getting confident with it is the hard part! With enough practice alone I believe most golfers short games would improve without 'fixing' dodgy technique. I've seen too many 'robotic armed', sterilised chipping techniques with no feel or touch over the years from golfers that have read in a magazine or heard third hand that the hands MUST stay ahead of the blade or the left wrist MUST NOT break down through the ball. Often these same golfers are the guys that will shell out hundreds of bucks on the newest Vokey Oil Can wedge or will buy golf magazines for the 'quick tips' that are promised to "Save your short game".

 

STATEMENT - Good quality time spent practicing the short game is going to make you a better golfer. A sound technique will help but the knowledge of how your ball behaves with different clubs and a good feel for distance will outweigh almost all technical frailties.

 

I love golf, I especially love the challenge of getting the ball into the hole in as few strokes as possible. Chipping and putting has always been the area that I practiced well into the dark as a kid. I can honestly say I've thought as little about technique in these two areas as anyone, yet I have continued to get better by practicing correctly. It's too easy to get caught up in the technique trap, let yourself practice 'stress free' and see what I mean. :blink:

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Sounds like fun to me. You might want to start a whole thread just for that so we don't overload this thread with scores.

 

I agree. If there are enough golfers wanting to get involved it could be fun to see scores improve over the month. This thread is turning into me sounding like some kind of 'psycho' chipping guru anyway. I honestly am not trying to disagree with folk just for the sake of it! :blink:

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