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Cutting Down Shaft on Belly Putter

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Quick question for you guys. I think I'm going to get my belly putter cut down to 38" from its original 43". My question is how would I counter the change in weight from taking off a good chunk off of the end of the club? Lead tape on the end of the shaft? Also, how much would cutting it down effect feel? 

 

My coach had a 35" putter and he added 3" to it and I liked the length of it and I tried out some 38" putters in a golf shop and decided that's the length I'll go with. My coach said he added a belly putter grip to keep the balance right for his putter but a belly putter would be different. I'm going to talk to the club repair man at my course and see what he thinks but I wanted to hear your opinions and experiences. 

 

Worst case scenario would be that I would invest in a different putter, but I'd get the lie checked out by someone so it would be fit for me as much as possible. I had my eye on the Taylormade Spider Blade putter. I didn't like it at first but it's starting to grow on me.

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Well I've been butchering my belly putters through this season, I've cut a Yes! sandy down from 43 inches to 37.5. I've then added a Superstroke belly putter.

 

 

I'm gripping the putter at around 34.5 inches.

 

 

The 3 inches out of the top balance the heavier putter head nicely (most belly putter heads are a bit heavier unless I'm mistaken).

 

 

Oh and of course it's not anchored.

 

 

Anyway try it without weight first, you might be pleasantly surprised.

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I have actually thought about this, and what I came up with in my head was making a lead 'bullet' to fit inside the top of the shaft with a 'flange' so it doesn't drop down the shaft. I have no idea what weight you'd need to make the lead bullet, but it could be an option.

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I have actually thought about this, and what I came up with in my head was making a lead 'bullet' to fit inside the top of the shaft with a 'flange' so it doesn't drop down the shaft. I have no idea what weight you'd need to make the lead bullet, but it could be an option.

That's pretty interesting, this idea makes me want to make one out of curiousity.

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Well I've been butchering my belly putters through this season, I've cut a Yes! sandy down from 43 inches to 37.5. I've then added a Superstroke belly putter.

 

 

I'm gripping the putter at around 34.5 inches.

 

 

The 3 inches out of the top balance the heavier putter head nicely (most belly putter heads are a bit heavier unless I'm mistaken).

 

 

Oh and of course it's not anchored.

 

 

Anyway try it without weight first, you might be pleasantly surprised.

I'm gripping the putter around 34.5-35.5 inches so that's good to know that it won't completely throw off the weighting, but everyone is different. Hopefully I can just cut it and be done with it.

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That's pretty interesting, this idea makes me want to make one out of curiousity.

If you do, make sure you take photos and document it. It'd be a great DIY thread!

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I have actually thought about this, and what I came up with in my head was making a lead 'bullet' to fit inside the top of the shaft with a 'flange' so it doesn't drop down the shaft. I have no idea what weight you'd need to make the lead bullet, but it could be an option.

 

gw0113.jpg

This sounds like what you were describing brad. I think it would work pretty well

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gw0113.jpg

This sounds like what you were describing brad. I think it would work pretty well

haha, that looks much slicker than what I had imagined! Can I ask, was there a link for this? Where did you find it? The sleeve is genius!

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I have ignored this thread, for some strange reason and I apologize. I assumed someone asked a question and someone answered it.  I finally read it and see that someone asked a question and many more echoed the question.  I have done this.

 

First, this may change the lie angle which can be a huge no no, and may require a different bend on the shaft.  There can be 4 or 5 degrees of difference in a belly putter lie angle and standard putter.  This can cause the toe of the putter up and not hit the ball in the center.  I cut down a broomstick putter and while this is the case, it is a center shafted putter so it does no make as much difference as a heel shafted putter.  It would certainly be a deal breaker in that case.  What is worse for me is that it is a thicker shaft than standard so it could not be bent.  But I drilled out the head and adjusted the lie angle that was.  I do not have a grip on it now and so i can not send pictures.

 

Second what defines the center of gravity is the balance point of the putter.  Because the weight of the head is countered by the length of the shaft and the weight of the grip you have a certain center of gravity.  When you cut the shaft off 5" you are shifting the center of gravity down the shaft about 5" plus when you go from a belly grip putter (145 g) to a standard grip (60 or 90 g) you further shift the weight towards the head.  So it is the combination of the length and weight loss in the grip can cause a very head heavy feel. 

 

Now, having said all that I played around with back weighting.  I put on a temporary grip with a screw sticking out on the butt and added various weights and played around a bit.  Honestly, it worked out that I really liked the head heavy feel, so I abandoned the back weighting project and played with the heavy headed putter.  However, as much as I liked the feel and the looks of that putter, I did not make as many putts or have any "hot streaks" putting with it.  I have gone back to my regular putter, but will still use this a couple of times a week in the putting room (I putt and make 30 twelve foot putts in a row, everyday on a putting strip in one of the rooms of my house.)  I feel like this heavy head keeps me moving the putter on the correct path and serves to ingrain the proper feel.

 

I also have a Scotty Cameron Kombi S 37" that was either extended or cut down.  I bought it this way at my Pro Shop and it was made for another member who did not like it.  A very short member.  I had to use up some credit so I picked this putter up.  I later found out I prefer a blade to a mallet.  But this putter has the standard belly putter grip.  It looks kind of funny to have a belly putter grip but this grip serves as kind of a counter balance itself.  i like the feel of this putter also.

 

Hope this helps.  I will check back to see if there are any specific questions about doing this.

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As Rick says obviously the putter can be impacted, I've so far cut down my Yes! sandy and my nike drone. I decided that I was happy to risk this with my collection on the grounds they'd become pretty much worthless (thanks r and a) and I needed to get away from anchoring.

 

 

I've yet to re grip the nike, but what I've done is to cut the grip off just below where I want to cut the shaft so that I can play with weights before re gripping for good - so it's still got grip where I hold it.

 

 

I've also cut a never compromise sub 30 down to 34 inches (it's a type 50 so centre shafted) and stuck on a fatso grip.

 

 

Ultimately best bet is to take off small amounts of shaft at a time and see what works for you - but I'd recommend the Superstroke belly putter grip (the 17 inch one) for your project once your happy with length and weight.

 

 

Will get some pictures online in the next day or so - got to be honest I think the Yes! Is as effective as anything I've had in the last 10 years.

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Thanks for everyone's replies so far. I have a couple questions regarding lie angle though. As of now at 43", I am gripping the putter normally as you would a standard putter and I'm not anchoring it so basically my goal is to take just a couple inches off of the top and keep the same setup, just a different length putter. That shouldn't affect lie too much, right? Just to let you know, I'm able to grip the putter normally because it is too short for me now so I won't have to change setup after cutting it. 

 

As for center of gravity, I have taken a lot of physics in high school so I know how center of gravity is affected. I did some calculations and had to eyeball it a bit as well and it turns out that the current setup balances at the end of the fifth step of the shaft, starting from the head working up to the end of the grip. To simplify what I mean, the center of gravity is 12.75" away from the bottom of the head. I did the math and then tested this to see if it's true and it was. 

 

With this said, should I try to keep the center of gravity close to that spot, 12.75", after cutting down the shaft to keep the balance and the feel the same?

 

If that's the case, I should be able to find out what I need to do as far as weighting goes in order to get it close to that again. 

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Thanks for everyone's replies so far. I have a couple questions regarding lie angle though. As of now at 43", I am gripping the putter normally as you would a standard putter and I'm not anchoring it so basically my goal is to take just a couple inches off of the top and keep the same setup, just a different length putter. That shouldn't affect lie too much, right? Just to let you know, I'm able to grip the putter normally because it is too short for me now so I won't have to change setup after cutting it. 

 

As for center of gravity, I have taken a lot of physics in high school so I know how center of gravity is affected. I did some calculations and had to eyeball it a bit as well and it turns out that the current setup balances at the end of the fifth step of the shaft, starting from the head working up to the end of the grip. To simplify what I mean, the center of gravity is 12.75" away from the bottom of the head. I did the math and then tested this to see if it's true and it was. 

 

With this said, should I try to keep the center of gravity close to that spot, 12.75", after cutting down the shaft to keep the balance and the feel the same?

 

If that's the case, I should be able to find out what I need to do as far as weighting goes in order to get it close to that again. 

What putter are you cutting down?  Does it come in standard and belly versions?  If it does just go to the manufacturers website and look up the specs on the lie angle for each version.  I had a SeeMore that the lie was actually the same on the standard and belly versions so no issues with cutting it down.

 

And yes, if you keep the weight at roughly the same point it should feel very similar.  That's basically just swing weighting the club.  Like many others have said though, play around with how much back weight you like.  You may find you like the heavier feeling head.

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Well, for a belly putter and a standard putter the lie angle is usually 71*.  For a broomstick putter it is 79*.

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43 finch putter you can grip without anchoring? You must be a giant!

 

Anything over 38 inches anchors for me. But I am quite short.....

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The lie for the belly version is 72 degrees and the standard version is 70 degrees.

 

Using 7th grade trig, your hands will be 2.6" different, when soling the putter.  However, according to Scotty Cameron, and I am not saying he is THE expert, just more expert than me, 71* is optimal, based on the average person.  However, that is half way between these, So I don't think it makes that much difference.

 

Screw it.  Mess with it until YOU are comfortable.  If you screw it up, buy another on eBay cheap, because people are going to be getting rid of them, and try again.

 

Short game to me is all about comfort.  If you are comfortable with your equipment you are going to hit better shots.  Recently, I went back to my old Titleist Vokey wedges.  When I get up to the green and pull one out of the bag it just feels good in my hands.  I make a few practice swings with it and when I "Feel" right I hit the ball.  And just know it is going in the hole.  Sunday, it went in once, had 3 tap ins and got up and down for par or better 9 out of 10 times.  The one time I did not the fact that I was able to get a bogey from there was huge.  When your team mates see your lie and the shot you have and say, "Play hard, Rick will not help out on this hole" you know it is not pretty.

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43 finch putter you can grip without anchoring? You must be a giant!

 

Anything over 38 inches anchors for me. But I am quite short.....

 

I'm 6 feet but I hold the putter upright so the end of the shaft is pointed away from my body, but no I'm not a giant like some people are.

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I picked up a Superstroke 21" grip and went to get the putter cut today but the repair shop was closed, looks like it'll have to wait another day or two.

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Whiskey, have you got a pipe cutter?

 

 

I find that works great for shafts - as for fitting grips, well that's not the hardest - if I can do it then anyone can.

 

 

Mind you a good repair shop should be able to do it in a couple of minutes and it gives piece of mind that you've lined the grip up properly.

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